Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Developmental Evidence for Obstetric Adaptation of the Human Female Pelvis

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Catterick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Thursday, September 7th, 2017 @ 12:29 AM
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Germanic and Celtic
    Ancestry
    British Isles & Scandinavia
    Subrace
    Borreby x Nordic
    Country
    Other Other
    Location
    Aqua
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Gondolier
    Posts
    2,197
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    34
    Thanked in
    34 Posts

    Developmental Evidence for Obstetric Adaptation of the Human Female Pelvis

    The human pelvis is maximally feminine at puberty up till age 25-30 in line with female peak fertility and then becomes more masculine again with increased age.

    http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/04/20/1517085113

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 02:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    974
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    20
    Thanked in
    18 Posts
    Well, the female pelvis is larger and wider in overall dimensions. The pelvis is made up of three bones. This article did not say specifically what parts change but the pubic bones change configuration during and after pregnancy. They are the bones in the front which spread to allow the child to pass through the birth canal. Then, afterward, ligaments tying both pubic bones together at their flat, facing surfaces contract and pull the two halves back in shape. It must be at this location that the change happens after the childbearing years.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Catterick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Thursday, September 7th, 2017 @ 12:29 AM
    Ethnicity
    Mixed Germanic and Celtic
    Ancestry
    British Isles & Scandinavia
    Subrace
    Borreby x Nordic
    Country
    Other Other
    Location
    Aqua
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Gondolier
    Posts
    2,197
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    34
    Thanked in
    34 Posts
    It would be interesting if the masculinisation of female hips in later life is a side effect to do with menopause and increased social authority of post-reproductive women securing status for their children. Womens faces also start to masculinise as fertility drops.

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Last Online
    Friday, October 7th, 2016 @ 02:13 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Country
    Other Other
    State
    Cape Province Cape Province
    Gender
    Family
    Youth
    Religion
    none
    Posts
    974
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    20
    Thanked in
    18 Posts
    The innominate and the sacrum are fused together and so would not change shape. The pubes bone does. So, I would assume if a change of shape occurs, the ligaments connecting the two halves of the pubes bone, which lengthen and slacken during pregnancy and then re-tighten, pulling the pubes back together, well, that shortening and loss of elasticity just continues into advancing age and the front of the pelvis just gets smaller.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 13
    Last Post: Sunday, August 21st, 2016, 12:45 AM
  2. Detection of Human Adaptation During the Past 2,000 Years
    By Englisc in forum Population Genetics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Monday, May 9th, 2016, 09:18 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Friday, August 10th, 2007, 04:49 PM
  4. Human Nakedness: Adaptation Against Ectoparasites?
    By Euclides in forum Anthropogeny & Ethnogenesis
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Wednesday, July 14th, 2004, 08:55 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Saturday, April 17th, 2004, 11:41 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •