Results 1 to 1 of 1

Thread: The Germanic Accent Shift: Sound Changes Which Distinguish Germanic and Indo-European

  1. #1
    Spirit of the Reich
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ahnenerbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Volksdeutscher
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Y-DNA
    I-M170
    Country
    European Union European Union
    Location
    Gau Westmark
    Gender
    Zodiac Sign
    Gemini
    Family
    Polyamory
    Occupation
    Herbalist
    Politics
    Ecological Geniocracy
    Religion
    Vedic
    Posts
    1,218
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    25
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    208
    Thanked in
    110 Posts

    Arrow The Germanic Accent Shift: Sound Changes Which Distinguish Germanic and Indo-European

    The Germanic Accent Shift

    In Indo-European accent (or word stress) was probably indicated by pitch and could fall on any syllable in the word. The placement of the accent depended on the length of the word and the nature of the morphological elements it contained.

    In Germanic, the IE movable pitch accent became a fixed accent, probably based on loudness. The Germanic accent was fixed on the root-syllable of the word. Since most IE prefixes disappeared at much the same time, the root-syllable was most often the first syllable.

    The unaccented syllables which followed the accented root-syllable tended to become reduced in loudness and have tended to become less distinct or even disappear over the course of time. Since many of these syllables were grammatical endings in IE, the Germanic languages have lost many of these endings.


    First Germanic Sound Shift

    The First Germanic Sound Shift, better known as Grimm’s Law, was first described by Jacob Grimm in 1822. Grimm’s Law affected the Indo-European stop consonants, or stops, which could be articulated as labial, dental, or velar sounds. IE also had a few other stops, but these were not developed in Germanic.

    Hence the IE dialect which gave rise to Germanic had the following stop consonants: [Read more...]

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sunday, November 20th, 2016, 06:24 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: Thursday, October 20th, 2016, 09:38 AM
  3. Replies: 9
    Last Post: Monday, March 5th, 2007, 05:19 AM
  4. Replies: 34
    Last Post: Tuesday, December 12th, 2006, 11:30 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •