Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Far Right rising in spite of its inability to provide a coherent economic message

  1. #1
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    6,076
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,035
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    769
    Thanked in
    348 Posts

    Far Right rising in spite of its inability to provide a coherent economic message

    The far right in Europe is rising in many European countries in spite of its inability to provide a coherent economic message


    “WE ARE providing food produced in Greece for Greek citizens only.” Ilias Kassidiaris, spokesman of Golden Dawn, sounded adamant gesturing towards a queue of hundreds of shabbily dressed, mostly elderly people waiting on August 1st for a handout of food aid in Syntagma Square outside parliament. A line of young women and men wearing the right-wing party’s trademark black T-shirts checked identification before giving grateful recipients a plastic carrier bag filled with fruit, vegetables and pasta.

    Golden Dawn is Europe’s most recently successful far-right party. It won 6.9% of the vote and 18 seats, mostly in Athens, at parliamentary elections in June. Nikos Michaloliakos, the party’s founder and leader, insists his is not a neo-Nazi group, despite a swastika-like official symbol and the Nazi-style salute from party members when he appears on a podium. Golden Dawn’s voters include many police officers, disaffected young Greeks and older people living in city districts with high rates of crime.

    The party has gained some credibility thanks to its food handouts and other social efforts, yet its overt racism, anti-Semitism and taste for violence disturbs many Greeks. “This party has a strong hooligan element as well as connections with the criminal underworld,” says Yiannis Boutaris, the mayor of Thessaloniki, who was criticised by Golden Dawn for backing the city’s first gay-pride celebration.

    A common view is that the economic downturn and austerity in the euro zone explain the rise of the anti-immigrant far right in Greece, the Netherlands, Hungary, Finland and other EU countries. But Matthew Goodwin, an expert on the far right at Nottingham University, finds the evidence unconvincing. “We are all voting for Nazis because Europe is in recession? That’s claptrap,” he says. Concerns over national culture, identity and a way of life matter more than material worries. The potential for a xenophobic party exists in every European state whether a country has a triple A credit rating, as the Netherlands does, or a country is on the brink of bankruptcy, as Greece is. “All it needs is for a semi-competent party to pick up on these sentiments,” says Mr Goodwin.


    The National Front in France (see article) and the Freedom Party in the Netherlands have been especially adept in exploiting the latent feelings of resentment against immigrants. Mainstream parties struggle to convince ordinary voters that they understand the popular anxiety about globalisation and the distrust of elites. Fiercely anti-immigrant, the Freedom Party (PVV), claims to trace its ideological roots back to the ideas of the Enlightenment and to defend them against culturally different newcomers.

    At elections in 2010, the PVV, which had been founded only five years earlier, used an anti-Islam platform to become the third-largest Dutch party. The PVV leader, Geert Wilders, has called Islam a “backwards” religion and requested a ban on the Koran. At the same time Mr Wilders has fashioned himself as defender of gay rights and gender equality. He is a staunch supporter of Israel, which happens to make his anti-Arab stance more plausible.

    Mr Wilders’ party has had a profound effect on Dutch politics. Mainstream parties terrified of bleeding votes have taken many of his ideas on board. A recent minority government that was supported by the PVV adopted a ban on burkas, a ban on double citizenship and other anti-immigrant policies. Most of these have been dropped since he pulled the plug on the cabinet earlier this year, but the Dutch Muslim minority was bruised.

    The economy is Mr Wilders’ Achilles heel. He took up fierce criticism of the EU and the single currency in the hope that his anti-EU-polemic will camouflage his lack of ideas for how to deal with the economic downturn. “The far right is struggling to weave an economic story into their message,” says Jamie Bartlett at Demos, a think tank in London. “They don’t have a coherent story to tell.” In the run-up to the Dutch elections that will take place on September 12th, Mr Wilders is campaigning hard on an anti-EU platform criticising the bail-out packages, promising a referendum on membership of the euro zone and even playing with the thought of ditching the Dutch EU membership altogether.

    Hungary’s Jobbik, an anti-Semitic and anti-Roma party, is in a different league of extremism compared with the PVV. Jobbik’s economic policies however are relatively sophisticated. The party advocates a mixture of state-control and protectionism combined with support for small entrepreneurs and farmers. Jobbik calls this an eco-social national economy: “Economic policy must endeavour to defend Hungarian industry, Hungarian farmers, Hungarian businesses, Hungarian produce and Hungarian markets”. Most Jobbik voters show little interest in the finer points of the party’s economic policy. Instead they harbour a sour resentment against what they call the “multis”, or multinationals, even though foreign companies, unlike some Hungarian firms, pay their employees’ tax and social security. A whole subculture of national-identity politics is flourishing in Hungary, with its own music, summer camps, bars and even a national taxi service called nemzeti.

    A national culture seemingly under threat is also the main attraction of the far right in the Nordic countries, which, with the exception of Finland, are still relatively untouched by the euro crisis. Norway’s Progress Party, the True Finns in Finland and the Danish People’s Party are all contenders for entering government in their country’s next general election. Only in Sweden has the far-right been shunned.

    Nordic far-right parliamentarians fight shy of comparison among each other, but the similarities are striking. They share a loathing of Islam, decry the attrition of Nordic culture and have strong views on law and order. Outsiders can be surprised by their growing appeal in a region that is famous for tolerance. Yet their plain-speaking and promises to care for the elderly, reduce taxes and preserve indigenous traditions strike a chord with many.

    After the second world war the far-right was taboo in much of Europe. As memories of the war fade, Europe’s far-right parties have adopted the welfare aspirations of the centre-left and flavoured them with protectionism and nationalism. Their increasing popularity suggests that this recipe will go down well—unless mainstream parties find ways to calm voters’ pressing anxieties over culture, identity and Europe’s way of life.
    Video: http://www.economist.com/node/215602...=1777653632001

    Source http://www.economist.com/node/21560294

  2. #2
    Senior Member Patrioten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    Thursday, September 19th, 2019 @ 04:32 AM
    Ethnicity
    Swedish
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Gender
    Politics
    Conservative
    Religion
    Protestant
    Posts
    1,919
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    5
    Thanked in
    5 Posts
    Economic cycles come and go. We see high points and down turns, yet through it all there is a society which exists regardless of the economic conditions at the moment. The liberals cannot guarantee continuous never ending economic growth, nor can the socialists. So for richer or poorer, for better or worse materalistically, there will still exist a society in which we will live our lives. It is for the soul and conditions of this very same society that the battle is waged between the liberal socialists and the socialist liberals on the one hand and the nationalists on the other. Economic policy, and its economic effects may come and go yet there still exists societal constants which the society can control if only popular will rather than ideology reigns supreme. It is this influence which is fought over across Europe, and which the left is refusing to give up without a fight. At its most desperate moments the left tries to bribe the voting public with high tales of economic wonderlands, yet the increasing realization that society is taking a turn for the worse, regardless of the economic policy in place, means that people are growing tired and weary of the established parties and their insistance of mass-immigration and multiculturalism no matter the costs to the native population.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Neophyte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Last Online
    1 Week Ago @ 01:42 AM
    Ethnicity
    Scandinavian
    Subrace
    Nordic + some Atlantid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Gender
    Age
    46
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Blut und Boden
    Posts
    1,947
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    56
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    55
    Thanked in
    38 Posts
    In this regard economic policy is unimportant, and actually counterproductive. The economy will always be there, our race and the basis for our way of life is something different entirely. When we get our countries back we can have a long debate about economics. While I personally might have preferences regarding economic policy my overarching policy is whatever that works and will not drive people away.

    That said, I believe that economics will serve a prominent role in the times to come because it is becoming more and more apparent for every day that passes that the economic models of the establishment have failed. Globalization, falling wages, and the financial crisis, they all stem from this failure, and providing a functioning alternative will be an important part in the struggle for a truly European Europe.

    From a Swedish perspective I think that we have come to the point where we with credibility can say that society worked better in the 60s and 70s and that it has been downhill ever since. Sure, technological progress has made us better off in the material sense, but underneath society has decayed.

Similar Threads

  1. Do Smurfs Provide a Model for a Good Society?
    By Elessar in forum Strategic Intelligence
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Saturday, June 25th, 2011, 08:36 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Monday, February 28th, 2011, 06:31 PM
  3. I Can Provide Photographic Essays. Any Requests?
    By Wulfram in forum Visual Arts & Aesthetics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Tuesday, January 12th, 2010, 09:00 PM
  4. 'Science cannot provide all the answers'
    By Loki in forum Comparative Religion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Thursday, September 4th, 2003, 09:32 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •