Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Dative Case

  1. #1
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Oski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 15th, 2019 @ 03:11 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    American
    Ancestry
    England & Norway
    Subrace
    Faelid + Nordid
    Y-DNA
    R-M405
    mtDNA
    U5a1a1
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    California California
    Gender
    Family
    Single parent
    Occupation
    Property management
    Politics
    Germanic Preservation
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    1,679
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    8
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Dative Case

    The dative case (abbreviated dat, or sometimes d when it is a core argument) is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to which something is given, as in "George gave Jamie a drink".

    In general, the dative marks the indirect object of a verb, although in some instances the dative is used for the direct object of a verb pertaining directly to an act of giving something. In Russian and Swiss German, for example, the verb "to call (by telephone)" is always followed by a noun in the dative.

    The thing being given may be a tangible object, such as "a book" or "a pen", or it may be an intangible abstraction, such as "an answer" or "help".

    In some languages, the dative case has assimilated the functions of other now-extinct cases. In Ancient Greek, the dative has the functions of the Proto-Indo-European locative and instrumental as well as those of the original dative.

    Sometimes the dative has functions unrelated to giving. In Scottish Gaelic and Irish, the term dative case is misleadingly used in traditional grammars to refer to the prepositional case-marking of nouns following simple prepositions and the definite article. In Georgian, the dative case also marks the subject of the sentence in some verbs and some tenses. This is also called the dative construction.

    The dative was common among early Indo-European languages and has survived to the present in the Balto-Slavic branch and the Germanic branch, among others. It also exists in similar forms in several non-Indo-European languages, such as the Uralic family of languages, Altaic family of languages and Japanese (sometimes considered as Altaic).

    Under the influence of English, which uses the preposition "to" for both indirect objects (give to) and directions of movement (go to), the term "dative" has sometimes been used to describe cases that in other languages would more appropriately be called lative.

    To read more:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dative_case
    __________________________________
    Paternal Haplogroup: R1b1b2a1a1*
    Maternal Haplogroup: U5a1a1
    Ancestry Painting: Europe 100%
    Global Similarity: Northern Europeans

  2. #2
    Moderator "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Sigurd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Last Online
    21 Hours Ago @ 05:01 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    Bavarii, Saxones, Suebi, Alamanni
    Subrace
    Borreby + Atlantonordoid
    Country
    Germany Germany
    Location
    Einöde in den Alpen
    Gender
    Age
    31
    Zodiac Sign
    Libra
    Family
    Engaged
    Politics
    Tradition & Homeland
    Religion
    Odinist
    Posts
    9,100
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    71
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    211
    Thanked in
    124 Posts
    Interesting to note is also that Lithuanian - having preserved seven of what is now (with the Hethitic and Proto-Anatolian evidence) believed to be nine original IE cases - know the absolute dative in the place where Greek has the absolute genitive and Latin has the absolute ablative.
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
    -Die alte Seele trauernd und verlassen / Verblassend in einer erklärbaren Welt / Schwebend in einem Dunst der Wehmut / Ein Schrei der nur unmerklich gellt-
    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

  3. #3
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Oski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 15th, 2019 @ 03:11 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    American
    Ancestry
    England & Norway
    Subrace
    Faelid + Nordid
    Y-DNA
    R-M405
    mtDNA
    U5a1a1
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    California California
    Gender
    Family
    Single parent
    Occupation
    Property management
    Politics
    Germanic Preservation
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    1,679
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    8
    Thanked in
    6 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    Interesting to note is also that Lithuanian - having preserved seven of what is now (with the Hethitic and Proto-Anatolian evidence) believed to be nine original IE cases - know the absolute dative in the place where Greek has the absolute genitive and Latin has the absolute ablative.
    The language of languages is greek to me
    __________________________________
    Paternal Haplogroup: R1b1b2a1a1*
    Maternal Haplogroup: U5a1a1
    Ancestry Painting: Europe 100%
    Global Similarity: Northern Europeans

Similar Threads

  1. The Case Against Socialism
    By Gall-Gaidheal in forum Political Theory
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Saturday, May 28th, 2011, 08:50 PM
  2. Case Converter
    By Dagna in forum Internet, Security, & Privacy
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Monday, November 17th, 2008, 03:26 PM
  3. The Case of Puertoricans
    By prguy in forum Physical Anthropology
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Friday, February 9th, 2007, 07:52 PM
  4. A Case of Lycanthropy
    By Blutwölfin in forum Alternative Sciences
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Wednesday, June 29th, 2005, 07:03 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •