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Thread: David Duke Against Wheat

  1. #21
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    I find that odd.
    Is "wheat intolerance" a kind of Nordic trait or does it merely depend on the person?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elessar View Post
    I find that odd.
    Is "wheat intolerance" a kind of Nordic trait or does it merely depend on the person?
    I'm not really sure, I was only diagnosed recently. My food allergies only developed in recent years. I miss drinking normal beer

    Gluten is a protein found in wheat that is bad for some people, but not all people. Severe gluten intolerance is also called celiac disease.
    Wheat sensitivities have been around as long as wheat.

    Gluten intolerances were most common among people of European decent.

    The theory is that lighter skinned people in general have a harder time digesting wheat because their ancestors did not consume enough wheat.
    Dietary intolerance to wheat is almost certainly more widespread than allergy, notably coeliac disease (CD) which is estimated to affect 1% of the population of Western Europe (Feighery, 1999), and dermatitis herpetiformis which has an incidence between about 2-fold and 5-fold lower than CD (Fry, 1992).

    Wikipedia:
    A recent study in Europe confirmed the increased presence of allergies to amylase/trypsin inhibitors (serpins)[2][5] and lipid transfer protein (LPT).[6] but less reactivity to the globulin fraction[7] The allergies tend to differ between populations (Italian, Japanese, Danish or Swiss),[citation needed] indicating a potential genetic component to these reactivities.

    Among the 6% of European coeliacs that do not have DQ2.5 (cis or trans) or DQ8 (encoded by the haplotype DQA1*03QB1*0302), 4% have the DQ2.2 isoform, and the remaining 2% lack DQ2 or DQ8.[24]

    The frequency of these genes varies geographically. DQ2.5 has high frequency in peoples of North and Western Europe (Basque Country and Ireland[25] with highest frequencies) and portions of Africa and is associated with disease in India,[26] but is not found along portions of the West Pacific rim. DQ8 has a wider global distribution than DQ2.5, and is particularly common in South and Central America; up to 90% of individuals in certain Amerindian populations carry DQ8 and thus may display the coeliac phenotype.[27]

    Lengthy text on Oxford journals: http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/content/60/6/1537.full

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dvergr View Post
    Grains contain phytic acid, unless they are fermented, even by simply soaking them overnight before using. If you eat grains which are not fermented your body is making "unabsorbable certain important minor minerals such as zinc and iron, and to a lesser extent, also macro minerals such as calcium and magnesium"

    In that case, you are actually causing a problem to your nutrition because honestly grains arn't doing your body much of a favor to survival and nutrition. Sure they taste good and are filling but you are really just wasting you money when it could be spent on more nutritious foods like vegetables, fruit and meats.

    A way to an early death is the modern American breakfast ... White toast with Margarine, Coffee with Soy Milk.
    No offense, but I think you might be confused if you think low-fat, low-cholesterol bread and coffee with low-fat, high protein soy milk will kill anybody. You've got to be joking? The only part that might be wrong with that breakfast is if the margarine contains trans fat (but you can buy butter spreads that have no trans fat).

    I'm fairly certain that eating a high fat, low fiber breakfast would actually be what killed you ...you know, eating a box of doughnuts or something.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    He has evidently taken a like to the paleolithic diet - whose inventor coincidentally died of a heart attack relatively young (54, I think) - and that's another reason why he may consider wheat, especially considering its high glycemic index, its high levels of histamine, etc. an issue ... and to some extent he is right.
    I think the paleo diet is a load of crap. We have teeth indicating we are omnivores. Some of the healthiest, longest living people in the world survive on diets that are largely rice.



    Like with everything, however, I think the key lies in moderation. In these days, everything is plenty, and as humans tend towards consuming whichever falls to them, it is consumed in over-abundance. The less dear and more readily available something is, the more it is in products, and the more it is going to be an "overdose" of what is actually healthy, and the more conscious a diet would have to be to stay healthy.

    On the addiction end: Someone drinking a glass of wine a week, or smoking a cigarette a year is not addicted, as he consumes in utmost moderation. The same is true with almost any other substance that you've been running your body on for a while - both on the physical and the mental level.

    As regards bread, I try and avoid white bread when I can and prefer the taste of breads that use a mixture of wheat and rye, or at least wholegrain wheat to the taste of plain white bread. Avoiding wheat altogether probably would not be possible around here without being rendered unable to eat half of the Sunday family dinner.
    It's always smart to eat more whole grains, but I don't think cutting out wheat is necessary for everyone, just people with gluten intolerance (just like some people are lactose intolerant).

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmie Dearest View Post
    I think the paleo diet is a load of crap. We have teeth indicating we are omnivores.
    Paleo diet is an omnivorous diet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sehnsucht View Post
    Paleo diet is an omnivorous diet.
    It is a meat heavy diet that relies too much on animal products. The paleo diet even advises against eating too much fruit. There's too much animal fat and not enough fiber. I can only imagine the colon blockages.

    I believe that it's really a first class ticket to heart disease and potentially constipation and intestinal blockages. The brain needs carbs, carbs are not the devil, and we are not cavemen. Cavemen actually didn't live that long anyway, so I'm not sure why anyone admires their diet.

    People began having longer lifespans when they settled down into agrarian communities and started eating more grains.

    People can have depression, intestinal issues, high cholesterol...there's also evidence that the so-called "facts" of the paleo diet are wildly skewed, that stone age people did probably consume grains.

    People can eat whatever they please, of course, I just don't think this is the answer, especially since there is plenty of evidence for people who have long healthy life spans who have vegetarian or nearly vegetarian diets.

    The closest I've ever seen to something probable is the blood type diet - of course, I do not believe that the blood type diet is "correct" - but I think the idea that some people do better with more carbs, and others with more protein is true, depending on their genetic make-up.

  6. #26
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    Even in Germany with high foodstuff inspection and control wheat is transported in tanks which have centimeter thick scale of mold on their walls.

    Most of the mold poison survives baking.

    The most famous one is German Mutterkorn or claviceps purpurea:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claviceps_purpurea

    Hundreds of thousands died in medieval times.

    I guess nowadays we are poisoned by lesser poison mold but even this is hazardous to our health.

    The globalist agenda wants to sell their products at a good price.
    You have to pay for it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thusnelda View Post

    Generations of our ancestors consumed products consisting of wheat and it didn´t prevent them from building and achieving the most developed civilizations in history. Most of my ancestors were farmers, and many of them reached their 70ies or 80ies, some of them even their 90ies!

    So "No!", something what was perfectly fine for hundred of years isn´t going to be harmful over night just because a new study claims that. .
    He might be barking up the wrong tree in so much as wheat itself isnt the problem, but modern industrialization of it is, in a similar manner to modern milk production.

    Heres a Sentence from the following fine Daily Mail article for those who cannot read the whole article.

    ------------------------------------------------------------

    Meanwhile, there is growing belief among medical researchers that modern industrial baking methods may be behind today’s extraordinary rise in digestive illness such as gluten intolerance and coeliac disease.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Read the whole article entitled, "Is your bread making you ill?" Here:- http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...s-bad-you.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by Esther_Helena View Post
    I'm a celiac (or maybe just gluten intolerant*). I cut out all wheat (and gluten) and gained 10 pounds.
    The drop wheat to drop weight, might work for some, but if you're a celiac... yeah, you're going to have some very different results.
    Sure I could start eating wheat again and get rid of those pounds, but what's the point in being skinnier if it's from not being able to absorb nutrients? Also, feeling like roadkill dragged along by a truck tire isn't fun either.

    *I haven't been officially diagnosed, but I know what happens if I eat gluten and let's just say it isn't pleasant.
    I'm not trying to be nasty, but one really shouldn't self diagnose where coeliac disease is concerned. I have coeliac disease. An intestinal biopsy is considered the gold standard for diagnosing the disease, and that is exactly how I was diagnosed. Prior to the diagnosis, my hemoglobin count was so low that I had to be hospitalised, and I received multiple blood transfusions. Four months later, I (thankfully)received the official diagnosis.

    Seriously, if you suspect you really have coeliac disease, don't cut wheat, rye or barley out your diet right away. Please see a doctor. Usually, your blood will be tested first for antibodies, so if you eliminate gluten out of your diet first, you won't have those antibodies. If those antibodies are present, you'll most likely be sent for a biopsy. However, a positive antibody test is not a diagnosis in and of itself of coeliac disease. It's also possible that you could have another digestive disease/disorder, too. In any case, see a doctor first!

    Coeliac disease is a real disease, not merely an allergy or gluten intolerance. Though I now have a completely gluten-free diet, I'm still struggling with vitamin deficiencies because the villi in my small bowel are quite damaged. Recovery has been slow for me, but I am nowhere as ill as I was two years ago.

    Good luck to you!

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    Can Wheat Drive More Than Your Digestive System Crazy?

    While wheat is well known to wreak havoc on the gastrointestinal health of genetically susceptible folks, such as those with celiac disease, and more recently, irritable bowel syndrome, new research published in the journal Psychiatry Research indicates that sensitivity to one of the components in wheat known as gliadin could be driving some into states of acute mania:


    “The relationship of the antibodies to the clinical course of mania was analyzed by the use of regression models. Individuals with mania had significantly increased levels of IgG antibodies to gliadin, but not other markers of celiac disease, at baseline compared with controls in multivariate analyses.”
    “Among the individuals with mania, elevated levels at follow-up were significantly associated with re-hospitalization in the six month follow-up period.”

    While correlation does not equal causation, it is interesting to note that there is already robust supportive research on the link between wheat consumption and schizophrenia. Seven such studies can be viewed on our open source wheat database, for those inclined to explore this connection further. You will also find listed there over a dozen neurological conditions linked to wheat consumption.




    For an additional explanation for why wheat may exhibit neurotoxic, if not also psychotropic properties, the excerpts from our essay series The Dark Side of Wheat are provided to shed light on the topic:


    Gliadin can be broken down into various amino acid lengths or peptides. Gliadorphin is a 7 amino acid long peptide: Tyr-Pro-Gln-Pro-Gln-Pro-Phe which forms when the gastrointestinal system is compromised. When digestive enzymes are insufficient to break gliadorphin down into 2-3 amino acid lengths and a compromised intestinal wall allows for the leakage of the entire 7 amino acid long fragment into the blood, glaidorphin can pass through to the brain through circumventricular organs and activate opioid receptors resulting in disrupted brain function.



    There have been a number of gluten exorphins identified: gluten exorphin A4, A5, B4, B5 and C, and many of them have been hypothesized to play a role in autism, schizophrenia, ADHD and related neurological conditions. In the same way that the celiac iceberg illustrated the illusion that intolerance to wheat is rare, it is possible, even probable, that wheat exerts pharmacological influences on everyone. What distinguishes the schizophrenic or autistic individual from the functional wheat consumer is the degree to which they are affected.


    Below the tip of the “Gluten Iceberg,” we might find these opiate-like peptides to be responsible for bread’s general popularity as a “comfort food”, and our use of phrases like “I love bread,” or “this bread is to die for” to be indicative of wheat’s narcotic properties. I believe a strong argument can be made that the agricultural revolution that occurred approximately 10-12,000 years ago as we shifted from the Paleolithic into the Neolithic era was precipitated as much by environmental necessities and human ingenuity, as it was by the addictive qualities of psychoactive peptides in the grains themselves.



    The world-historical reorganization of society, culture and consciousness accomplished through the symbiotic relationship with cereal grasses, may have had as much to do with our ability to master agriculture, as to be mastered by it. The presence of pharmacologically active peptides would have further sweetened the deal, making it hard to distance ourselves from what became a global fascination with wheat.


    An interesting example of wheat’s addictive potential pertains to the Roman army. The Roman Empire was once known as the “Wheat Empire,” with soldiers being paid in wheat rations. Rome’s entire war machine, and its vast expansion, was predicated on the availability of wheat. Forts were actually granaries, holding up to a year’s worth of grain in order to endure sieges from their enemies. Historians describe soldiers’ punishment included being deprived of wheat rations and being given barley instead. The Roman Empire went on to facilitate the global dissemination of wheat cultivation which fostered a form of imperialism with biological as well as cultural roots.


    The Roman appreciation for wheat, like our own, may have had less to do with its nutritional value as “health food” than its ability to generate a unique narcotic reaction. It may fulfill our hunger while generating a repetitive, ceaseless cycle of craving more of the same, and by doing so, enabling the surreptitious control of human behavior. Other researchers have come to similar conclusions. According to the biologists Greg Wadley & Angus Martin:


    “Cereals have important qualities that differentiate them from most other drugs. They are a food source as well as a drug, and can be stored and transported easily. They are ingested in frequent small doses (not occasional large ones), and do not impede work performance in most people. A desire for the drug, even cravings or withdrawal, can be confused with hunger. These features make cereals the ideal facilitator of civilization (and may also have contributed to the long delay in recognizing their pharmacological properties).”


    WHEAT PEPTIDES EXHIBIT MOLECULAR MIMICRY


    Gliadorphin and gluten exporphins exhibit a form of molecular mimicry that affects the nervous system, but other wheat proteins effect different organ systems. The digestion of gliadin produces a peptide that is 33 amino acids long and is known as 33-mer which has a remarkable homology to the internal sequence of pertactin, the immunodominant sequence in the Bordetella pertussis bacteria (whooping cough). Pertactin is considered a highly immunogenic virulence factor, and is used in vaccines to amplify the adaptive immune response. It is possible the immune system may confuse this 33-mer with a pathogen resulting in either or both a cell-mediated and adaptive immune response against Self.



    WHEAT CONTAINS HIGH LEVELS OF EXCITO-TOXINS


    John B. Symes, D.V.M. is responsible for drawing attention to the potential excitotoxicity of wheat, dairy, and soy, due to their exceptionally high levels of the non-essential amino acids glutamic and aspartic acid. Excitotoxicity is a pathological process where glutamic and aspartic acid cause an over-activation of the nerve cell receptors (e.g. NMDA and AMPA receptor) leading to calcium induced nerve and brain injury. Of all cereal grasses commonly consumed wheat contains the highest levels of glutamic acid and aspartic acid. Glutamic acid is largely responsible for wheat’s exceptional taste. The Japanese coined the word umami to describe the extraordinary “yummy” effect that glutamic acid exerts on the tongue and palate, and invented monosodium glutamate (MSG) to amplify this sensation. Though the Japanese first synthesized MSG from kelp, wheat can also be used due to its high glutamic acid content.



    It is likely that wheat’s popularity, alongside its opiate-like activity, has everything to do with the natural flavor-enhancers already contained within it. These amino acids may contribute to neurodegenerative conditions such as multiple sclerosis, Alzhemier disease, Huntington’s disease, and other nervous disorders such as epilepsy, attention deficit disorder and migraines. [The Dark Side of Wheat]

    A critically acclaimed internet classic, The Dark Side of Wheat is now available to own as a downloadable document exclusively from GreenMedInfo.com. It includes two hard-hitting essays that represent a seachange in the way wheat intolerance is comprehended; no longer a rare, strictly genetically-based disease, wheat is revealed to be a species-specific intolerance, whose role in health and disease has been greatly misunderstood since ancient times.


    The downloadable document also includes a 90-page quick reference guide containing hyperlinks to research on the National Library of Medicine on over 120 diseases that have been linked to wheat consumption.

    The Dark Side of Wheat has changed many minds about the exalted status of wheat among secular and sacred institutions alike.

    As Dr. Ron Hoggan, co-author of "Dangerous Grains" puts it in the foreword: "Sir Isaac Newton's famous metaphor (perhaps quoting others) said something to the effect that we see further, not because of any special endowment of our own, but because we are standing on the shoulders of giants. After reading Sayer's work on wheat, I felt as if I had just been boosted to a higher plane from which I could see and understand much, much more. Sayer's insights continue to shape and inform much of my effort to understand the various impacts of grains on human health."
    Source http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/can...e-system-crazy

  10. #30
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    All refined flours are highly inflammatory and parasitic to humans.
    The bio-chemical process taking place in the stomach recquire many ingredients. Refined flour (as well as refined sugar and oils) are poisons that gradually weaks you, they have a highly parasitic effect on the body.

    If you seek optimal health, avoid them. Also if you are sick, the healing process recquire to stay away from those substances. That's not optional.

    The second problem about wheat is GLUTEN content. Which is higher than a few decades ago. The industrials imperatives has lead to developp some wheat varieties with a very high gluten content (sticks like a glue for improved malleability).

    My modest advices :

    ALWAYS eat complete grains. Not refined.
    I personally do not have any problem with organic complete wheat. Eating refined wheat, even organic, awake inflammation.

    If you can't stand gluten, like many people who mostly ignore it, then switch to other grains like buckwheat, millet, quinoa. Spelt and Kamut do contains gluten as well.

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