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Thread: Asian Food Has Become Increasingly Popular in the UK

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    Post Asian Food Has Become Increasingly Popular in the UK

    Chinese stir-fry has now replaced chicken tikka masala as Britain’s favourite dish, a new survey revealed today.
    The simplistic Cantonese dish, typically full of fresh vegetables and noodles, is now the most frequently cooked meal in the UK.
    One in five Brits now have it at least once a week, with over two-thirds saying a large part of its appeal is that its far easier to prepare than traditional British cuisine, with the average stir-fry only taking a few minutes to throw together and cook in a wok.
    Asian food has become increasingly popular in the UK and is now a part of the nation’s staple diet as families opt for international cuisine over British dishes three out of seven nights of the week.
    Nine out of ten of Brits' favourite international meals are Asian
    The study, carried out by Food Network UK, also found that sushi and noodles are now cooked as regularly as spaghetti and potatoes.
    Having become accustomed to exotic spices, half of Brits also say traditional British dishes such as cottage pie, sausages and mash, and fish and chips are simply too dull.

    Over a quarter of us now eat more Chinese, Thai and Japanese cuisine than we did 10 years ago.
    And the survey suggests it is a trend which is likely to grow, with a third of parents admitting their children are more adventurous and open to trying new foods than they are.
    Nick Thorogood, Managing Director of Food Network EMEA, said: 'Our research shows British palettes have changed and we now have a penchant for exotic tastes across the globe.
    'It would have been unheard of for a typical family to tuck in to regular evening meals originating from Thailand or Japan a decade or so ago.
    'But now it is considered normal to be swapping a Cottage Pie for a Thai Green Curry.
    'It is interesting to see nine out of the top ten international meals we regularly eat are Asian dishes.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz1k6QjBJgk

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    It's not a bad thing.
    A lot of foods from across the globe help us to sustain healthy lives.
    A lot of superfoods are from Asia, things like Goji berries and Acai berries, they do wonders for the human body. Goji berries are amazing for fighting off cancerous cells, as are chillies.
    I fully support the rise in exotic food entering the UK trade system.
    It's generally healthier and more exciting than our own produce....

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    It is a shame that Britain's favourite dish is not native to these Isles, but worse is how much food is imported from outside of Europe.

    Other than the odd spice, there is no need.

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    I find is very difficult to understand what's so "good" about Asian food, and almost any other foreign foods, if we are speaking nutrition. Can anyone please enlighten me?

    Most of the Asian food I have seen for example, is basically some rice (not good), along with some 90% sugar sauce (not good), some vegetables (well, +/-0 really, as they are most often processed and have lost what's good about them), and some meat (generally good, but there's nothing "foreign" about it).

    I don't want to sound like the usual xenophobe, saying everything foreign is evil, but I have a hard time to see what's so magnificent about it. I'd rather see people exploring and finding traditional European foodstuff instead. Might often be a bit boring for people who are used to "modern taste sensations", but in turn - it is 100% health. And in addition, it is more or less there in our "DNA protocol" already, we are meant to eat it.

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    The English produce the finest apples in the world, but we import them from New Zealand. This must be the very definition of insanity. There are a number of small orchards within the surrounds of my town. All of them have won national awards (one of which supplies both Buckingham Palace and Sandringham House), yet you cannot buy any of these apples from the Tesco supermarket less than a mile and a half away.

    Everything you need to survive is grown in England. Our foods are not as boring as people make out, either. I’d much rather eat food grown from English soil than something from an unfamiliar land.

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    English food needs a renaissance... maybe I should learn to cook and dig deep into old cookery books.

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    One of the characteristics of European culture is the ability to discern and appreciate subtleties. Classical music and fine art are other examples (besides food) of subtle beauty that is often lost on the dregs of other continents. Our cultures have great traditions of cuisine which show us the many and varied flavors available from the produce of our lands. It's something even the jaded can enjoy and appreciate, and the avenues for exploration there are almost endless.

    On the baser side of taste though, are those who just eat Indian because they want to see if they can stand to eat vindaloo or red naga peppers. They hardly stop to realize that such strongly flavored dishes traditionally are purposely that way to cover up the mish-mash of mystery meat used to make them. We are talking about a culture where people defecate in the streets in full view of passersby. Taste (in all its aspects) is not one of the banners of their culture.

    East Asian cuisine is not that much different. Stronger spices are there to cover up some of the baser and less palatable things used in making these dishes. Often one has a hard time identifying what meat they are really eating in a mess of Chinese food. Their dishes all seem to me to be either very bland or very spicy. There just are not many of the subtle flavors that one can appreciate in traditional European fare.
    Most people think as they are trained to think, and most people make a majority.

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    I prefer a nice Sunday beef roast myself. Curries and Chinese cuisine as pleasant as it can be just doesn't cut it for me and is just not as satisfying.

    I wonder if eating far eastern food will have an inevitable effect on our minds and bodies? Will we end up 5'2" and slight lol? Seriously though, are there any studies to do with this sort of thing? I do believe that what we eat is being used as a weapon against us to unbalance our health in conjunction with sedentary lifestyles.

    (edit* I had heard certain curries were invented for medicinal reasons.)

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    Things that we need to sustain our health can't always be found in this country.
    I have a homemade curry every week on a Saturday. Because of this, my immune system has been super boosted. I have a better, healtheir lifestyle than a lot of people I know because of the diverse diet I have. Italian, Indian, Thai, Greek, Spanish, Scottish, etc...
    British food to me is very boring and bland. I much prefer alternative lifestyles.

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    My palate is unsophisticated. Cereals and grains feature heavily in my diet, followed by vegetables, fruits, nuts and both red and white meats (occasionally fish, too). I don’t think many people would wish to live on my diet, but I wouldn’t wish to change it. I consider myself to be a very healthy person, and it has been years since I last felt ill.


    Quote Originally Posted by Astrid Runa View Post
    Things that we need to sustain our health can't always be found in this country.
    I have a homemade curry every week on a Saturday. Because of this, my immune system has been super boosted. I have a better, healtheir lifestyle than a lot of people I know because of the diverse diet I have. Italian, Indian, Thai, Greek, Spanish, Scottish, etc...
    British food to me is very boring and bland. I much prefer alternative lifestyles.
    I agree that there are a vast array of foods that have desirable health qualities which can only be sourced from foreign lands, but all too often I believe we overlook the great foods that are being produced in our own back yards. It’s good to know that you have a diet that you believe benefits you, though. It does sound healthy and I congratulate anybody who is immune to the fast food culture we’re living in.

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