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Thread: Your Favorite Historical Artifacts

  1. #11
    Senior Member Linden's Avatar
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    The Crosby Garrett Helmet





    The Crosby Garrett Helmet is a brass Roman cavalry helmet dating to the late 1st to mid 3rd century AD. It was found by an unnamed metal detectorist near Crosby Garrett in Cumbria, England, in May 2010, close to a Roman road, but a distance from any recorded Roman settlements.The helmet is thought to have been used for ceremonial occasions rather than for combat. Similar helmets found in Britain are the Ribchester Helmet (found in 1796), the Hallaton Helmet (found in 2000) and the Newstead Helmet (found in 1905), though it has closer parallels with helmets found in southern Europe.

  2. #12
    Account Inactive Halldorr's Avatar
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    Oldest depiction of human face

    An ivory carving dated to 27,000 BC. Oldest known depiction of the human face.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  3. #13
    Senior Member Linden's Avatar
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    The Witham Shield


    The Witham Shield is an Iron Age decorative bronze shield facing of La Tène style, dating from about the 4th century BC. The shield was discovered in the River Witham in the vicinity of Washingborough and Fiskerton in Lincolnshire, England in 1826 (roughly 20 miles from where I live ). Further excavations at a nearby site have revealed posts interpreted as the foundation for a causeway, as well as artifacts including a sword, spears and part of a human skull with a sword fragment lodged within. The shield now resides in the British Museum.

    Appearance:

    The Witham Shield is an example of the style of Celtic art known as La Tène. The bronze facings show evidence of having been reworked. The most noticeable feature is the central dome which would have been required for functional reasons as it allowed the owner to hold the shield close to its centre of gravity. Originally a leather silhouette of a long-legged wild boar would have been riveted to the shield around the central dome, as indicated by small rivet holes and staining of the shield. The pattern of discolouration was very clear when the shield was recovered from the River Witham. Although it is still possible to see the discolouration under certain lighting conditions, the boar design is no longer easy to make out. The boar may have been a tribal emblem or represented the prowess of the shield's owner, but could also have been a representation of the Celtic god Moccus. The shield also has a number of birds and animals incorporated into the design. The roundels at each end are inspired by the heads of birds, which are supported by horses with wings for ears. Birds similar to crested grebes are engraved on the central spine and this completes the engraving work elsewhere.

    Construction:

    The shield was made principally from wood, now perished, to a design later known as a "Gaulish Shield" that originated in the seventh century BC. What remains is an almost complete facing that had been made to cover its surface. The sheeting is 0.2-0.3 mm thick and was designed to be applied to a wooden backing estimated at 8 mm thick. There are two main sheets that meet at the midpoint of the shield. Each of these sheets is just over one meter long. The join is not neat, and it is hidden from view by a covering strip. The shield is decorated with a central spindle boss, on which are pieces of red coral that are thought to have come from the Mediterranean area.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Angus's Avatar
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    "Early Iron age tattoo equipment". These beauties can be seen at the National Museum of National Antiques in Stockholm. I apologize for not having any more information on them, I've had this picture for years now and haven't been able to find more information on them since.

    the bayeux tapestry

    The tapestry is a band of linen 231 feet (70 metres) long and 19.5 inches (49.5 cm) wide, now light brown with age, on which are embroidered, in worsteds of eight colours, more than 70 scenes representing the Norman Conquest. The story begins with a prelude to Harold’s visit to Bosham on his way to Normandy (1064?) and ends with the flight of Harold’s English forces from Hastings (October 1066); originally, the story may have been taken further, but the end of the strip was either not completed or later removed.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Hilderinc's Avatar
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    If the Romans were forgetful enough to leave such great things all over Britain, just image what treasures lie elsewhere.


    Quote Originally Posted by Linden View Post
    the Hallaton Helmet (found in 2000)
    10 January 2012


    What has been hailed as one of the most significant recent UK Iron Age finds is going on display after a nine-year conservation project.

    The decorated Roman cavalry helmet was discovered at a site in Leicestershire.

    Experts said its date, close to the Roman invasion of 43 AD, meant it could be evidence of Celtic tribes serving with the Roman army.

    The artefact, which was found in fragments, has been restored by a team at the British Museum.

    The Hallaton Helmet will be displayed permanently at Harborough Museum, in Market Harborough, Leicestershire, from 28 January alongside the other finds from the site.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england...shire-16475224






    Speaking of helmets, here is a Greek one from 350-325 BC, found at Herculanum, Taranto, in Italy.

    All that is necessary for Evil to triumph is for good Men to do Nothing. ~ Edmund Burke

  6. #16
    Senior Member Linden's Avatar
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    The Coppergate Helmet


    The Coppergate helmet (York helmet) was found in May 1982 at a site where many Viking Age artifacts had been discovered previously during the archeological excavations. The Anglo-Saxon helmet was right beneath the surface, protected by a brick chimney above. It was created about AD 750-775 but deposited considerably later: the brass decoration was already worn. There are also evidence of using the helmet in battle. Then someone buried it in a wood-lined pit along with a few other objects. It is unclear why such a fine possession was hidden, but it attracted universal attention after it was struck by the claw of a mechanical digger 28 years ago.

    After careful excavation and reconstruction the quality craftsmanship of the Coppergate helmet became evident. It was made of iron, with two cheek-plates and a well-preserved mail curtain. Its characteristic feature is a long nose-guard. Both the guard and the edge of eyebrows are richly decorated with brass ornamentation (tests revealed that it contains about 85 percent copper). The framework of the helmet consists of four main elements: a band of iron encircling the head; the brow band to which another band is riveted, running from front to back over the crown; two shorter bands run over the ears. The four spaces between these bands are filled with triangular plates.
    The brass strips running from ear to ear and from front to back bear a Latin inscription that reads: IN NOMINE : DNI : NOSTRI : IHV : SCS : SPS : DI : ET : OMNIBVS : DECEMVS : AMEN : OSHERE : XPI. The last segment of the inscription represents the first three letters in XPICTOC, Christ in Greek. Oshere is an Anglo-Saxon personal name. The initial part of the inscription seems clear: 'In the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit and God [the Father]'. What follows received various interpretations: 'And with all we pray. Amen', or: 'And to all we say Amen or else: 'Let us offer up Oshere to all saints. Amen'.

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    Senior Member Herr Weigelt's Avatar
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    For me it would have to be The Lewis Chessmen. They were chess pieces carved out of walrus tusk in the 1100's in Norway most likely and found in Scotland.



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_chessmen
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v119/Sabdude/Anglospheresig.jpg
    In hoc signo vinces
    "Get the blacks out of my country." - Queen Elizabeth I

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    Senior Member Rohirrim's Avatar
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    Coligny Calendar

    From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coligny_calendar
    The Gaulish Coligny calendar was found in Coligny, Ain, France (46°23′N 5°21′E) near Lyon in 1897, along with the head of a bronze statue of a youthful male figure. It is a lunisolar calendar. It is now held at the Gallo-Roman Museum of Lyon.

    It was engraved on a bronze tablet, preserved in 73 fragments, that originally was 1.48 m wide and 0.9 m high (Lambert p. 111) or approximately 5 feet (1.5 m) wide by 3½ feet in height.[1] Based on the style of lettering and the accompanying objects, it probably dates to the end of the 2nd century AD[2][3]. It is written in Latin inscriptional capitals and is in the Gaulish language (Duval & Pinault). The restored tablet contains sixteen vertical columns, with 62 months distributed over five years.

    The French archaeologist, J. Monard, speculated that it was recorded by druids wishing to preserve their tradition of timekeeping in a time when the Julian calendar was being imposed throughout the Roman Empire. However, the general form of the calendar suggests the public peg calendars (or parapegmata) found throughout the Greek and Roman world (Lehoux pp. 63–65).

    A similar calendar found nearby at Villards d'Heria (46°25′N 5°44′E) is only preserved in eight small fragments. It is now preserved in the Musée d'Archéologie du Jura at Lons-le-Saunier.

  9. #19
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
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    Female Roman gladiator

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    According to experts, if confirmed, this will be only the second depiction of a female Roman gladiator ever found, but even more impressive than the first considering this one killed whatever the hell she did with only one a single hand and leg.

    The gladiator statue shows a topless woman, wearing only a loincloth and a bandage around her left knee. Her hair is long, although neat, and in the air she raises what the researcher, Alfonso Manas of the University of Granada, believes is a sica, a short curved sword used by gladiators. The gesture she gives is a "salute to the people, to the crowd," Manas said, an action done by victorious gladiators at the end of a fight.


    The female fighter is looking down at the ground, presumably at her fallen opponent
    Source http://www.livescience.com/19729-fem...atue-rome.html

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    Probably not my favorite, but interesting nonetheless.

    Quote Originally Posted by Medieval Irish Belt

    When Susannah Kelly of UCD completed the belts conservation she passed it to leather specialist John Nicholl who is currently analysing it. The condition and quality of the belt has surpassed all our wildest expectations, and it truly ranks as a ‘Museum Piece.’ John has kindly allowed us to share some of his photographs of the item with our readers; these shots were taken yesterday as he continues his work on the analysis. You will note that the hinged Heraldic shields appear to carry a Lion Rampant as a motif!

    John’s initial thoughts are that it may be a scabbard belt of possible 14th or 15th century date, though analysis is at a very early stage so this interpretation may change. The buckles have been cut down and reused on the object, which would undoubtedly have been a valuable item when it was discarded. It is unclear if the heraldic symbols represent a nobility affiliation or if they serve a purely decorative function, but it is hoped heraldic analysis will clarify some of these issues.

    http://rubiconblog.com/

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