Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Well-Preserved Germanic Castles

  1. #1
    Senior Member Wulfram's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last Online
    1 Week Ago @ 05:57 PM
    Ethnicity
    Mostly German/Some English/Some Irish
    Subrace
    Nordid
    State
    Texas Texas
    Gender
    Politics
    Far Right
    Posts
    2,887
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    38
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    28
    Thanked in
    20 Posts

    Well-Preserved Germanic Castles

    This thread will be devoted to castles from Germanic lands that have retained much of their original appearance. Anyone may contribute if they want. You can add historical photographs, old prints, pictures of scale models, videos, etc.

    Castle Eltz, or Burg Eltz, Germany

    "Burg Eltz is a medieval castle nestled in the hills above the Moselle River between Koblenz and Trier, Germany. It is still owned by a branch of the same family that lived there in the 12th century, 33 generations ago. The Rübenach and Rodendorf families' homes in the castle are open to the public, while the Kempenich branch of the family uses the other third of the castle.

    Lurking in a mysterious forest, it's been left intact for 700 years and is furnished throughout as it was 500 years ago. Thanks to smart diplomacy and clever marriages, Burg Eltz was never destroyed. It's been in the Eltz family for nearly 850 years.

    Elz is the name of a stream that runs past the castle through a deep valley before emptying into the Mosel. The first Burg (castle) on the Elz appeared in the 12th century to protect a trade route. By 1472 the castle looked like it does today, with the homes of three big landlord families gathered around a tiny courtyard within one formidable fortification.
    "



















    Images from the museum inside, which displays family heirlooms:


















  2. #2
    Senior Member Wulfram's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last Online
    1 Week Ago @ 05:57 PM
    Ethnicity
    Mostly German/Some English/Some Irish
    Subrace
    Nordid
    State
    Texas Texas
    Gender
    Politics
    Far Right
    Posts
    2,887
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    38
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    28
    Thanked in
    20 Posts
    Ammersoyen castle, or Kasteel Ammersoyen, The Netherlands

    "Ammersoyen Castle was built around 1350 near the Maas river by the Van Herlaer family. It has a rectangular almost square layout of four wings centered around a little courtyard with heavy round towers at its four corners. It shows similarity to other square castles like Helmond Castle, Muiden Castle and the partially remaining Radboud Castle. Ammersoyen Castle is connected to the separate bailey by a bridge and the entire site is moated.

    In 1386 already the castle was taken by force by Willem van Gulik, the Duke of Gelre. The Dukes of Gelre remained owners of the castle for 25 years. In 1412 Duke Reinald V granted the castle to his otherson; Willem van Wachtendonk, who in 1424 sold the castle to Johan van Broekhuizen, Lord of Waardenburg.

    In 1496 the Van Arkel family married into ownership of the castle. This family lived in the castle until 1694.

    In 1513 the castle was damaged during a siege and following occupation by Burgundian troops lead by Count Hendrik van Nassau. In 1574 the castle was again occupied, this time by Spanish troops. The hasty departure from the castle by the troops of Prince Willem van Oranje kept the castle from any serious damage. In 1590 however the castle was not so lucky; it was gutted by a great fire which left it in ruins. Due to the threat of the 80-Years War the rebuilding of the castle didn't start until 1648. The rebuilding took 19 years. Peculiar enough the castle wasn't rebuild to a 17th century house but to its medieval appearance. Although modernizations were carried out inside, a lot of medieval elements remained behind plaster and bricked up doorways.

    The existence of Ammersoyen Castle was again threatened in 1672 when French troops invaded the Netherlands, destroying many castles on their path. The last Lord of the Van Arkel family saved the castle by paying a ransom of fl 7000,- to the French troops. This left him in big financial trouble and he died in 1694.

    The last Lord of Ammersoyen was a Baron Arthur de Woelmont. During 1868 he entertained an English writer; John Box, who wrote a book about the castle called: Chronicles of the Castle of Amelroy or Ammerzode, illustrated with photographs of the castle and its interior.
    "



















    Here is one more of Burg Eltz I forgot to include in the opening post:

  3. #3
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    6,041
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    961
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    708
    Thanked in
    321 Posts
    Akershus Festning, Oslo, Norway

    "The first construction on the castle started around the late 1290s, by King Haakon V, replacing Tønsberg as one of the two most important Norwegian castles of the period (the other being Båhus). It was constructed in response to the Norwegian nobleman, Earl Alv Erlingsson of Sarpsborg’s earlier attack on Oslo.

    The fortress has successfully survived all sieges, primarily by Swedish forces, also by Charles XII in 1716. In the early 17th c., the fortress was modernized and remodelled under the reign of the active King Christian IV, and got the appearance of a renaissance castle.

    The fortress was first used in battle in 1308, when it was besieged by the Swedish duke Eric of Södermanland, who later in the same year won the Swedish throne. The immediate proximity of the sea was a key feature, for naval power was a vital military force as the majority of Norwegian commerce in that period was by sea. The fortress was strategically important for the capital, and therefore, Norway as well. Whoever ruled Akershus fortress ruled Norway.


    The fortress has never been successfully captured by a foreign enemy. It surrendered without combat to Nazi Germany in 1940 when the Norwegian government evacuated the capital in the face of the unprovoked German assault on Denmark and Norway (see Operation Weserübung). During World War II, several people were executed here by the German occupiers. After the war, eight Norwegian traitors who had been tried for war crimes and sentenced to death were also executed at the fortress. Among those executed was Vidkun Quisling.

    Akershus has also been a prison, a section of it known as The Slavery (Norwegian: Slaveriet) as the prisoners could be rented out for work in the city. It has housed many rebels and criminals through Norwegian history. Particularly well-known people to have been imprisoned there includes the semi-legendary "thief of the people" and author Gjest Baardsen (1791–1849), and the similarly idealized thief Ole Høiland. Also, many early Norwegian socialists (supporters of Marcus Thrane, 1817–1890) also spent time in the cells of Akershus.

    Kautokeino rebellion prisoners

    Following the 1852 Laestadian Sámi revolt in Guovdageaidnu, all men except the two leaders Aslak Hætta and Mons Somby (who were beheaded in Alta) ended up in Akershus Fortress – the women were imprisoned in Trondheim. Many of the rebels died after a few years in captivity.[2] Among the survivors was Lars Hætta (18 years at the time of imprisonment), who during his stay was allowed time and means to write the first translation of the Bible into North Sámi.[3]
    [edit]
    Current usage

    Akershus fortress is still a military area, but is open to the public daily until 9pm. In addition to the castle, the Norwegian Armed Forces Museum and the Norwegian Resistance Museum can be visited there. The Norwegian Ministry of Defence and Defence Staff Norway (armed forces headquarters) have a joint modern headquarters in the eastern part of Akershus Fortress.


    Norwegian Royalty have been buried in the Royal Mausoleum in the castle. They include, King Sigurd I, King Haakon V, Queen Eufemia, King Haakon VII, Queen Maud, King Olav V and Crown Princess Märtha.

    A portion of the fortress was replicated at the Norway (Epcot) pavilion at Epcot Center theme park in Orlando, Florida.






    The sarcophagi of King Haakon VII, Queen Maud (the white sarcophagus), King Olav V and Crown Princess Märtha (the green sarcophagus).











    German surrender of Akershus Fortress on 11 May 1945.


  4. #4
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    6,041
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    961
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    708
    Thanked in
    321 Posts

    Bergenhus festning, Norway

    Bergenhus fortress (Norwegian: Bergenhus festning) is a fortress located in Bergen, Norway. Bergenhus fortress is located in the entrance to the harbor in Bergen. This is one of the oldest and best preserved castles in Norway.

    The fortress contains buildings dating as far back as the 1240s, as well as later constructions built as recently as World War II. The extent of the enclosed area of today dates from the early 19th century. In medieval times, the area of the present-day Bergenhus Fortress was known as Holmen (The islet), and contained the royal residence in Bergen, as well as a cathedral and several churches, the bishop's residence, and a Dominican monastery. Excavations have revealed foundations of buildings believed to date back to before 1100, which might have been erected by King Olav Kyrre. In the 13th century, until 1299, Bergen was the capital of Norway and Holmen was thus the main seat of Norway's rulers. It was first enclosed by stone walls in the 1240s.

    Of the medieval buildings, a medieval hall and a defensive tower remain. The royal hall, today known as Haakon's Hall, built around 1260, is the largest medieval secular building in Norway.[citation needed] The defensive tower, known in the Middle Ages as the keep by the sea, was built around 1270 by King Magnus VI Lagabøte, and contained a royal apartment on the top floor. In the 1560s it was incorporated by the commander of the castle, Erik Rosenkrantz, into a larger structure, which is today known as the Rosenkrantz Tower.

    In the Middle Ages, several churches, including the Christ Church, Bergen's cathedral, were situated on the premises. These however were torn down in the period 1526 to 1531, as the area of Holmen was converted into a purely military fortification under Danish rule. From around this time, the name Bergenhus came into use. Building work on the Christ Church probably started around 1100. It contained the shrine of saint Sunniva, the patron saint of Bergen and western Norway. In the 12th and 13th centuries it was the site of several royal coronations and weddings. It was also the burial site of at least six kings, as well as other members of the royal family. The site of its altar is today marked by a memorial stone.

    In the 19th century, the fortress lost its function as a defensive fortification, but it was retained by the military as an administrative base. After restoration in the 1890s, and again after destruction sustained during World War II, Bergenhus is today again used as a feast hall for public events. During World War II, the German navy used several of its buildings for their headquarters, and they also constructed a large concrete bunker within the fortress walls. The buildings, including the Haakon's Hall, were severely damaged when a Dutch ship in the service of the German navy, carrying approximately 120 tons of dynamite, exploded on 20 April 1944 in the harbour just outside the fortress walls, but the buildings were later restored.

    Bergenhus is currently under the command of the Royal Norwegian Navy, which has about 150 military personnel stationed there. The fortifications Sverresborg fortress and Fredriksberg fortress also lie in the centre of Bergen. Haakon's Hall and the Rosenkrantz Tower are open for visits by the public.

    Haakon's Hall (Norwegian: Håkonshallen) is a medieval stone hall located inside the fortress. The hall was constructed in the middle of the 13th century, during the reign of King Håkon Håkonsson (1217–1263). In medieval times, it was the largest building of the royal palace in Bergen, then the capital of Norway. It was built as a replacement for older wooden structures on the site. It is the largest secular medieval building in Norway.

    No written records survive of the construction of the hall. According to Håkon Håkonsson's saga the building was not there at the coronation of King Håkon in 1247. It does however state that it was used during the wedding celebrations of king Magnus Håkonsson and the Danish princess Ingebjørg Eriksdatter on 11 September 1261. The hall is built in Gothic style. In addition to the great hall itself, there were two more levels, a cellar and a middle floor. The hall's similarity to English structures of the same time, and the fact that monumental stone building was relatively uncommon in Norway at the time, has led to an assumption that the hall was designed by English architects, possibly the court architect of King Henry III of England, with whom King Håkon was on friendly terms.


    The hall has been hit by several fires, the first one as early as 1266. From the death of King Eirik II in 1299, Bergen lost its status as the main royal residence, and from 1380 until 1814, Norway was in a personal union with Denmark, which meant that the royal castle in Bergen gradually fell into decay. In 1429 it was captured and burnt by the Victual Brothers, but a new stone portal from the mid-15th century shows that the hall was rebuilt after this event. Soon after that, however, as the old royal residence was transformed into a purely military fortress, the Hall was turned into a storage building.

    By the 19th century, its original function had been completely forgotten, and it was sometimes referred to as "the old church". However, the 19th century saw the rise of national romanticism in Norway as the country gradually regained its independence. As a result, the independent medieval kingdom was used as a source of new national symbols to rally around. In 1840, it was proven that the great stone building in Bergenhus fortress was, in fact, king Håkon Håkonsson's old feast hall. For the next half-century, its restoration back to its original function was debated. Henrik Ibsen wrote a poem in the hall's honor, and poet Henrik Wergeland first used the name Haakons hall in one of his poems. The hall was finally restored in the 1890s, and in the 1910s it was decorated with frescos with motives from Håkon Håkonsson's saga, and stained glass windows.[3]

    The hall was severely damaged on 20 April 1944, when a Dutch ship in the service of the German navy, carrying over 120 tons of dynamite, accidentally exploded whilst docked on the harbour outside the walls of Bergenhus fortress. The stone structure was undamaged, but the wooden roof caught fire and burned up. The fire also destroyed all the decorations from the first restoration. A second restoration took place in the 1950s, and the hall was reopened on 11 September 1961, the 700th anniversary of its first use. It is now decorated more discreetly, primarily with tapestries.

    Haakon's Hall is now administered by the Bergen Museum, which also takes care of the Rosenkrantz Tower and other protected buildings in the city. The hall is occasionally used for concerts, especially choir song and chamber music, and for banquets, mainly for official functions. A popular restaurant and bar at the edge of the Columbia University campus in New York is named Haakon's Hall

    The Rosenkrantz Tower (Norwegian: Rosenkrantztårnet) is one of the most prominent buildings of Bergenhus fortress. The tower derives its name from governor Erik Rosenkrantz (1519-1575). It was during his administration (1559–1568) that the tower received its present shape and structure. The oldest part of the building, however, is made up of a medieval tower, known as the "Keep by the Sea", built by King Magnus the Lawmender in the 1270s as part of the royal castle in Bergen.

    Rosenkrantz Tower

    The keep was slightly modified c. 1520, then extensively modified and expanded in the 1560s by Scottish stonemasons and architects in the service of Erik Rosenkrantz to attain its present form. Rosenkrantz' building contained dungeons on the ground floor, residential rooms for the governor higher up, and positions for cannons on the top floor. In the 1740s, the tower was converted to a magazine for gunpowder, a function it served until the 1930s. The whole building has been open to the general public since 1966. Today, the tower serves primarily as a tourist attraction.















  5. #5
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    6,041
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    961
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    708
    Thanked in
    321 Posts
    Kristiansten Fortress (Norwegian: Kristiansten Festning, historically spelled Christiansten) is located on a hill east of the city of Trondheim in Sør-Trøndelag county, Norway. It was built after the city fire of Trondheim in 1681 to protect the city against attack from the east. Construction was finished in 1685. It fulfilled its purpose in 1718 when Swedish forces laid siege against Trondheim. The fortress was decommissioned in 1816 by king Charles XIV John

    Trondheim was traditionally protected with fortifications by the river Nidelven and Skansen, but the city was vulnerable to attack from the east. The Fortress was therefore put on a hill to protect the city centre and control the area from Ila to Lade. General Johan Caspar von Cicignon, who was chief inspector of Norwegian fortifications, was responsible for the new town plan of Trondheim after the great fire of 18 April 1681. He also made the plans for the construction of Kristiansten Fortress.[1][2][3]

    The fortress was built during the period from 1682 to 1684 and strengthened to a complete defence fortification in 1691 by building an advanced post Kristiandsands bastion in the east and in 1695 with the now vanished Møllenberg skanse by the river Nidelven. These fortifications were encircled by a continuous palisade and thereby connected to the fortified city. In 1750 the fortress was modernized with new bastions and casemates to protect against mortar artillery. Two new isolated defensive works were also built to the east - Grüners and Frølichs redutt - but they are hardly visible today.

    The main building featured in the picture is the defensive tower - Donjonen - with artillery, quartering and stores was the centre of the defences. After decommissioning in 1816 it was location of the fire watch, and since 1997 as a museum.

    In the final days of the Great Northern War, Karl XII of Sweden initiated a second invasion of Norway in the fall of 1718. While Karl XII led his main army in an attack from the south at Fredrikshald, an army under General Carl Gustaf Armfeldt (or Armfelt) was sent into Trøndelag to seize Trondheim. Armfeldt advanced against Trondheim, which was defended by an army of 6,900 men under Vincens Budde. The Swedish forces were resisted both by Norwegian forces and by the people of the countryside, who bitterly recalled the previous Swedish occupation of Trøndelag. Provisions were not available, and the Norwegian winter set in. Although he reached the city and laid siege, the strength of Kristiansten Fortress and other fortifications was such that he chose to retreat toward Verdal. Karl XII issued a sharp rebuke and ordered Armfeldt to take Trondheim. Although Armfeldt's forces surrounded Trondheim, Budde's forces were able to keep him at bay. Camping in the open and poorly fed, many of Armfeldt's troops fell ill and his capable forces were reduced to 4,000 men. When Karl XII was killed in December by a bullet at Fredriksten Fortress, Armfeldt's forces retreated to Sweden. On their way back across the mountains, almost the entire army was lost, mostly because of snow, cold temperature and a strong blizzard; the retreat has been likened to Napoleon’s from Moscow for the severity of casualties.


    The Norwegian war flag with the badge denoting the union with Sweden was hauled down on 9 June 1905, and the "pure" war flag was hoisted instead, with full military honours and gun salutes for both flags. On 18 November 1905 a twenty-one gun salute was again fired from Kristiansten Fortress to proclaim the election of Prince Carl of Denmark as the new King of Norway under the name of Haakon VII of Norway. The flag of union with Sweden was hauled down and the Flag of Norway hoisted.

    During German occupation of Norway in World War II the Nazis executed a number of Norwegian patriots at Kristiansten.

    The fortress was the official place of execution of convicted and condemned traitors and war criminals following the legal purge in Norway after World War II. The notorious Henry Rinnan was executed here on 1 February 1947, and nine of his followers afterwards, eight of them on the same day in 1947.


















  6. #6
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    6,041
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    961
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    708
    Thanked in
    321 Posts
    Kalmar Castle (Kalmar slott) is a castle in Kalmar, the province of Småland in Sweden

    During the twelfth century a round defensive tower was built on Kalmarsund and a harbour constructed. At the end of the thirteenth century King Magnus Ladulås had a new fortress built with a curtain wall, round corner towers and two square gatehouses surrounding the original tower. Located near the site of Kalmar's medieval harbor, it has played a crucial part in Swedish history since its initial construction as a fortified tower in the 12th century.

    One of the most significant political events in Scandinavia took place at Kalmar Castle in 1397, when the Kalmar Union was formed - a union of Denmark, Norway and Sweden, organized by Queen Margaret I of Denmark. During the Swedish rebellion against Denmark in 1520, the fortress was commanded by Anna Eriksdotter.

    The fortress was improved during the 16th century under the direction of King Gustav I and his sons King Eric XIV and King John III, who turned the medieval fortress into a castle fit for a renaissance king. Kalmar Castle suffered heavy damage during the Kalmar War of 1611-13 and was badly damaged by a fire in 1642. Repairs were begun but from the end of the seventeenth century the castle was allowed to fall into disrepair.

    In 1856 , architect Fredrik Wilhelm Scholander (1816 - 1881) initiated restoration work at Kalmar Castle. His pupil Helgo Zettervall continued restoring Kalmar Castle in the 1880s. Architect Carl Möller drew up the plans and other documents. The work began in 1885 and by 1891 the castle had gained the silhouette it bears today. In 1919 professor Martin Olsson was charged with the continuing restoration of earthworks, the moat, the bridge and the drawbridge. Work continued until 1941, when the castle was once more surrounded by water. Today, it is one of Sweden's best preserved renaissance castles and is open to the public.
























  7. #7
    Senior Member Wulfram's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last Online
    1 Week Ago @ 05:57 PM
    Ethnicity
    Mostly German/Some English/Some Irish
    Subrace
    Nordid
    State
    Texas Texas
    Gender
    Politics
    Far Right
    Posts
    2,887
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    38
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    28
    Thanked in
    20 Posts
    Trausnitz Castle, Landshut, Germany




















  8. #8
    Senior Member Angus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    Saturday, April 8th, 2017 @ 10:27 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Moderate
    Religion
    Folkish Heathen
    Posts
    747
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Castle Fraser.
    Castle Fraser was built between 1575 and 1635 but since then there have been alterations in the early 19th century and the addition of a grand staircase in Victorian times (though this was demolished after the Second World war). The name Fraser originated in Anjou in France (originally de Frisselle, de Freselière or de Fresel). They settled first in Tweedale and Lothian, the name becoming Fraissier (strawberry bearer) with the flower of the fraisse or strawberry as part of their armorial bearings.

    Sir Alexander Fraser married the sister of King Robert the Bruce and another Fraser founded the town of Fraserburgh. In the 15th century, Thomas Fraser was granted the lands of Muchall and Stoneywood and originally the castle bore the name of Muchall-in-Mar (until 1695).

    In the mid-1570s, Michael Fraser began to create a larger house, which was called initially "Michael's Tower", but it was incomplete when he died at the end of the 1580s. So it was his heir, Andrew Fraser who completed the castle, much as it appears today. Andrew took advantage of the period of peace brought about by the Union of the Crowns in 1603, married well and became the First Lord Fraser in 1633. It was Andrew who placed a large panel above his first-floor entry to the castle with the royal coat of arms and his own arms below - see illustration on the right.

    The second Lord Fraser (also named Andrew) married the daughter of Lord Balermino, an outspoken critic of King Charles I's attempts to impose an Anglican form of worship on the Scottish church. Lord Fraser was of a like mind, and became a supporter of the Covenanters who fought to maintain the Presbyterian church. In 1644, the Marquess of Montrose who was in command of the Royalist forces in Scotland attacked the farmland and corn stores, but spared the castle.

    The Fraser family supported both the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite Uprisings. The castle and estate passed through a number of heirs, not always in a direct line and the last Fraser to own the property never lived in it as he became Privy Chamberlain to the Pope and then Master of Ceremonies at St Peter's in Rome. In 1921, the estate was bought (at auction) by the First Viscount Cowdray for his second son, The Hon. Clive Pearson. The family had a passion for restoring old buildings and a painstaking restoration was undertaken by Mr Pearson, which was continued by his second daughter. In 1976, the castle and 26 acres of land were gifted to the National Trust for Scotland.







    Glamis Castle
    Glamis Castle is the historic seat of the Bowes-Lyons Family, the lands were presented to them as a gift by Robert the Bruce in 1372. The Bowes-Lyons family still own the castle as the earls of Strathmore, its members include the Queen Mother, who was born at Glamis and gave birth to Princess Margaret here. The main keep of the castle dates from the 14th century, and the majestic towers and turrets were added in later years.

    According to legend the castle is as haunted as it is because of an ancient curse brought on the family by Sir John Lyon, who removed an ancestral chalice from their seat at Forteviot, where it was supposed to reside for ever. The castle is also mentioned in Shakespeare's play MacBeth, and the murder of King Malcolm the II is supposed to have taken place in one of the rooms. It is highly unlikely as the castle dates from the 14th century and the murder from the 11th century.




  9. #9
    Senior Member DrTeutoburg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Last Online
    Friday, August 24th, 2012 @ 02:59 PM
    Ethnicity
    Scottish
    Ancestry
    Scotland/Ireland
    Country
    Scotland Scotland
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Writer
    Religion
    Thelemite
    Posts
    26
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Mystery Castle

    Hello all, I am new to the forums and in need of some help. I am trying to identify a castle.



    The book I found this picture in claims it is Castle Frankenstein, which is obviously fiction -but the print looks authentic, and I wondered if anyone can tell me what castle this is, assuming it is real. I would love to know more about it. The book has no picture credits or sources, so that is no help.

    Any help much appreciated.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Hilderinc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Online
    Saturday, August 25th, 2012 @ 03:05 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    England, Germany, Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Illinois Illinois
    Location
    Not Chicago
    Gender
    Posts
    983
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrTeutoburg View Post
    Hello all, I am new to the forums and in need of some help. I am trying to identify a castle.

    The book I found this picture in claims it is Castle Frankenstein, which is obviously fiction -but the print looks authentic, and I wondered if anyone can tell me what castle this is, assuming it is real. I would love to know more about it. The book has no picture credits or sources, so that is no help.

    Any help much appreciated.

    The picture is a 19th century illustration by Gustave Doré for 'Puss in Boots'.

    The castle was inspired by the French Château d'Oiron.
    All that is necessary for Evil to triumph is for good Men to do Nothing. ~ Edmund Burke

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Pictures of European Castles
    By Appalachian in forum Visual Arts & Aesthetics
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Wednesday, December 12th, 2018, 04:02 PM
  2. Which Germanic Folk Has Preserved Most Heathen Tradition?
    By Oswiu in forum Germanic Heathenry
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Monday, November 26th, 2018, 12:22 PM
  3. Dutch castles from the Golden Era
    By Frans_Jozef in forum Netherlands & Flanders
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Saturday, February 3rd, 2007, 12:18 PM
  4. Mediaeval Castles in Finland
    By Blutwölfin in forum Middle Ages
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Friday, September 23rd, 2005, 11:22 AM
  5. Viking Ring Castles
    By Blutwölfin in forum Viking Age
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Saturday, July 23rd, 2005, 02:53 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •