Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 56

Thread: Which Germanic Language is the Purest?

  1. #1
    Account Inactive
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Last Online
    Friday, March 9th, 2012 @ 03:06 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Swedish + English
    Subrace
    Faelid/Brunn + Tronder
    Country
    United States United States
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Occupation
    student
    Politics
    preservation
    Religion
    I believe in my paycheck
    Posts
    10
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Which Germanic Language is the Purest?

    English has a lot of Latin, Greek and Gaelic influence. German is a lot purer than English from what I can tell. It has a lot less Greek and Latin words in it. I wonder why it resisted thsese influences and English didn't. Anyway, which Germanic language was able to resist foreign influence the most and retained the highest level of Germanic linguistic purity?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Olavssųnn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Last Online
    Saturday, August 25th, 2012 @ 05:38 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian-Scandinavian
    Ancestry
    My known ancestry is Norwegian
    State
    Nordic Union Nordic Union
    Location
    Västra Värmland
    Gender
    Age
    26
    Politics
    Identitarian
    Religion
    Germanic & Indo-European Heathen
    Posts
    374
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    If I shall do a wild guess... Icelandic, perhaps?
    Icelandic is the living Germanic language that is changing most slowly, and they try to avoid adopting foreign words, inventing their own, Icelandic words instead when it's needed.

  3. #3
    Lost in Melancholia
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Thusnelda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Bavarian tribe
    Ancestry
    Bavarian
    Subrace
    Nordid-Borreby
    State
    Bavaria Bavaria
    Location
    Over the hills and far away
    Gender
    Age
    34
    Occupation
    Breathing the forest
    Politics
    Regionalist-conservative
    Religion
    Įsatrś/Forn Sišr
    Posts
    4,380
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    37
    Thanked in
    26 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Olavsson View Post
    If I shall do a wild guess... Icelandic, perhaps?
    Icelandic is the living Germanic language that is changing most slowly, and they try to avoid adopting foreign words, inventing their own, Icelandic words instead when it's needed.
    Well, I“d agree with this! I“ve been to Iceland some years ago and I couldn“t detect any verbal anglicisms, or at least only very less words of that kind.

    Here“s a video of Icelandic language. It sounds like a mix of Danish, Norwegian, Faroese and something else to me.

    Icelandic language

    "Judge of your natural character by what you do in your dreams" - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  4. #4
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Žoreišar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Online
    16 Minutes Ago @ 08:34 PM
    Ethnicity
    Scandinavian
    Ancestry
    East Norwegian + distant Finnish
    Subrace
    Nordid + reduced CM
    Y-DNA
    I1a1
    Country
    Norway Norway
    Location
    Sweden
    Gender
    Age
    29
    Occupation
    Traditional Craftsman
    Politics
    Family, Nation & Nature
    Religion
    Heathen Worldview
    Posts
    2,294
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2,143
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,300
    Thanked in
    635 Posts
    Icelandic, without a doubt. It is the Germanic language that has diverged the least from Proto-Germanic, as well as having adopted the least non-Germanic vocabulary. The runner-up would have to be Scandinavian (I consider Norwegian, Danish and Swedish mere dialectal groups within the same language), then German (from the perspective of Hochdeutsch. Perhaps there are some German dialects that are more or less Germanic than the other languages), then Dutch, then Afrikaans, and then English. I would go as far as calling English a Germano-Latin language, considering the vast influence of Latin origin it has received during the last millennium.

    EDIT: Oops...I forgot Frisian. My knowledge of the language is too scarce to form an opinion, but I would think it is slightly more Germanic than Dutch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ęthelthryth View Post
    English has a lot of Latin, Greek and Gaelic influence.
    Gealic influence in the English language..? Where?
    A nation is an organic thing, historically defined.
    A wave of passionate energy which unites past, present and future generations

  5. #5
    Senior Member Sturmbaon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    Monday, October 24th, 2016 @ 08:43 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Donauschwabe
    Ancestry
    german, austro-hungarian
    Subrace
    pred. Nordid
    Country
    Austrian Empire Austrian Empire
    State
    Danube Swabian Community Danube Swabian Community
    Location
    Ungarn
    Gender
    Age
    34
    Family
    Searching for nordic girl
    Occupation
    Engineer
    Politics
    Preservationist
    Religion
    Theist
    Posts
    124
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Thusnelda View Post
    It sounds like a mix of Danish, Norwegian, Faroese and something else to me.
    To me it sounds separate, rather than a mix.
    Geitarborg ķ Įrhnjįrlandi | Kämpft gegen die Einwanderung! | Aufnordung

  6. #6
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Žoreišar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Online
    16 Minutes Ago @ 08:34 PM
    Ethnicity
    Scandinavian
    Ancestry
    East Norwegian + distant Finnish
    Subrace
    Nordid + reduced CM
    Y-DNA
    I1a1
    Country
    Norway Norway
    Location
    Sweden
    Gender
    Age
    29
    Occupation
    Traditional Craftsman
    Politics
    Family, Nation & Nature
    Religion
    Heathen Worldview
    Posts
    2,294
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2,143
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,300
    Thanked in
    635 Posts
    Phonetically, Icelandic is closest to Faroese and some Norwegian dialects on the West coast, but not really any mix at all. Disregarding phonetics, it shares a lot of similarities with Elfdalian.
    A nation is an organic thing, historically defined.
    A wave of passionate energy which unites past, present and future generations

  7. #7
    Extra ecclesiam nulla salus.
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Primus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Last Online
    2 Weeks Ago @ 09:07 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Albion.
    Subrace
    Alpinid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    New York New York
    Gender
    Age
    43
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    'anti-semite'
    Politics
    Republicanism, traditionalism, .
    Religion
    Roman Catholic
    Posts
    1,791
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    15
    Thanked in
    14 Posts
    Icelandic.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Wychaert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Last Online
    Wednesday, July 10th, 2019 @ 04:19 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Dutch
    Ancestry
    Gelderland
    Subrace
    Borreby/Dalofaelid/Nordid
    Country
    Netherlands Netherlands
    State
    Gelderland Gelderland
    Location
    Betuwenaar in Salland
    Gender
    Family
    Married parent
    Politics
    Volks
    Religion
    Odalist
    Posts
    661
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    156
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    94
    Thanked in
    27 Posts
    The Dutch language has changed many times, especially after the 2nd world war.
    Now we have a lot of Englisch and French words in our language. The French words we use are a left over from the Napoleon days.

    I believe Frisian has changed very little, but a Fries could explain that better.
    Flemmish on the other hand, is a bit more pure Dutch in my ears, I believe its the way we use to speak (without the soft G).
    I think that the purest form of all languages are the local dialects.
    ''Ginds de Waal, daar weer de IJssel, dan de Maas en ook de Rijn. Geeft ons recht om heel ons leven trots op Gelderland te zijn.''

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Last Online
    Saturday, August 25th, 2012 @ 03:47 PM
    Ethnicity
    Danish
    Ancestry
    Danish
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    Denmark Denmark
    Location
    Kųbenhavn
    Gender
    Age
    35
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Unemployed
    Politics
    Nationalist, conservative
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    382
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ęthelthryth View Post
    English has a lot of Latin, Greek and Gaelic influence. German is a lot purer than English from what I can tell. It has a lot less Greek and Latin words in it. I wonder why it resisted thsese influences and English didn't. Anyway, which Germanic language was able to resist foreign influence the most and retained the highest level of Germanic linguistic purity?
    As for the English language, it can probably be traced back to the Norman Invasion in 1066. The Saxon upper class was replaced with a French-speaking Norman class of conquerors. The entire country was essentially run in French and Latin with the lower classes speaking some sort of Saxon between themselves. In time French, Latin and the Saxon language more or less merged into what we today call English.

    I am not entirely sure that I would consider a Germanic language with fewer Latin or Greek words in it to be more 'pure' then others. It is perfectly normal to use loan words for concepts and ideas that there is no word for in your own language. It does not have to be such a negative thing.

    If it were, we would all have to abandon our parent's language and begin speaking Old Norse, Gothic or even Sanskrit.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Last Online
    Saturday, August 25th, 2012 @ 03:47 PM
    Ethnicity
    Danish
    Ancestry
    Danish
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    Denmark Denmark
    Location
    Kųbenhavn
    Gender
    Age
    35
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Unemployed
    Politics
    Nationalist, conservative
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    382
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Gealic influence in the English language..? Where?
    "Whiskey" and "Loch" are obvious examples, and English does have a few other minor words derived from Celtic languages. Mostly words taken directly from the peoples living on the British Isles before them.

    Much the same way that American English includes words such as "maize", "teepee", "tobacco", "tomahawk" and Australian English has "boomerang", "kangaroo", "didgeridoo".

Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 162
    Last Post: 4 Weeks Ago, 01:02 AM
  2. Replies: 30
    Last Post: Wednesday, January 4th, 2012, 07:33 PM
  3. Constructing a New Germanic Language
    By rainman in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: Saturday, July 31st, 2010, 02:58 AM
  4. Learn Germanic Language
    By Teuton in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: Saturday, December 6th, 2008, 04:07 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •