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Thread: Colonials as Europeans

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    Colonials as Europeans

    What do you think of Colonials (Americans, Canadians, Australians, etc.) who identify as European? Specifically, I refer to those whose families have been in the New World for some generations, did not inherit any European traditions but who try to practice and pass down the language, culture and history of their distant ancestors and even wish to move to Europe. Europeans, do you accept these people as one of your own, and Colonials, how do they make you feel? Why and amongst who do you believe this trend occurs and is it detrimental to our country and the countries of others?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deary View Post
    What do you think of Americans who identify as European? Specifically, I refer to those whose families have been here for some generations, did not inherit any European traditions but who try to practice and pass down the language, culture and history of their distant ancestors and even wish to move to Europe.
    They are bothersome. We have plenty of uniquely American traditions of which to be proud. By instilling "European" traditions in Americans of mixed nationality, you weaken the unity amongst Americans of European descent and strengthen the idea that multiculturalism is a healthy way of thinking.






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    I don't see it as particularly contradictory or injurious for an American, or other Colonial, to hold on to their Europeans roots, even if their heritage is quite distant. My most recent European ancestors, two generations back to be precise, hail from Scotland, Northern Ireland, and England, and, in my own experience, the only real culture to hold onto there is a fondness for football (the real kind) and the odd plate of fish and chips every now and then. It may be a unique case in Canada, however, as most institutions here stem from the country's British origins, but, in any case, the divide between Anglosphere nations isn't as significant as it is between us and continental Europe. I make it a point of remembering my more distant German and Dutch roots as well, and that includes learning the languages, but I don't place great emphasis on it.

    Generally speaking, "ethnic" Europeans in the Colonies, such as Italians, Poles, and Portuguese retain their identities, including the cultural aspects of such, for generations, and this has allowed them to remain more mono-ethnic compared to older Colonials, who mostly forgot about the ways of their ancestors and focused on a melting-pot society. It worked, and in many ways was a good idea, before non-Northerners started turning up. However, holding on to a unique, ancestral ethnic identity is more likely to discourage inter-ethnic mixing and thus preserve Colonial identity much more effectively. That shouldn't suggest a 12th-generation German-American should stop speaking English and throw on lederhosen every day, but they should know and appreciate their ancestral identity, in addition to their American home, and keep their blood in mind when choosing a partner and a way of life for their children. As American, and wider Colonial, identity owes its origins primarily to Germanic settlers to begin with, old-stock Colonials are in a unique and difficult situation when it comes cultural practices, and for this reason I do not oppose a reasonable mix of both.

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    Ethnic identities are group identities. It is not possible to be part of an identity without being part of such a group. One of my own in a swamp of foreigners will quickly join the bog people and turn into a case for resuscitation and re-assimilation, at best. I consider those Germans as my people who form distinct enclaves and fulfill the trinity of biological, linguistic and cultural conformity. Improved communication has made it easier for individuals to try and be part of an ethnic group far away, but this is superficial and does not permeate the entire existence of that person. It is more like enjoying pieces of foreign culture within a personal life that is distinct and belongs to another culture and nation. As far as relocation to Europe is concerned, their efforts are obviously a helpful prearrangement, but assimilation has to be completed among us.

    I have made the experience that those people who actually move here are highly motivated and educated as well as exceptionally loyal to their new/old nation. I consider them a boon. Conversely, their departure might be a loss for their nation of birth, but less so if they were not loyal to begin with and if dissatisfaction with their country is the very reason for their desire to leave.

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    Such an issue often comes up. I'm reminded of that old saying "(insert ethnicity) by blood, American by choice".

    It is my belief that there is too much 'choice' as far as that is concerned. I think one of the best ways to stem this would be to abolish dual citizenship. Some people I know in NZ even have US citizenship even though they've had basically nothing to do with the place.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loyalist View Post
    I don't see it as particularly contradictory or injurious for an American, or other Colonial, to hold on to their Europeans roots, even if their heritage is quite distant. My most recent European ancestors, two generations back to be precise, hail from Scotland, Northern Ireland, and England, and, in my own experience, the only real culture to hold onto there is a fondness for football (the real kind) and the odd plate of fish and chips every now and then. It may be a unique case in Canada, however, as most institutions here stem from the country's British origins, but, in any case, the divide between Anglosphere nations isn't as significant as it is between us and continental Europe. I make it a point of remembering my more distant German and Dutch roots as well, and that includes learning the languages, but I don't place great emphasis on it.

    Generally speaking, "ethnic" Europeans in the Colonies, such as Italians, Poles, and Portuguese retain their identities, including the cultural aspects of such, for generations, and this has allowed them to remain more mono-ethnic compared to older Colonials, who mostly forgot about the ways of their ancestors and focused on a melting-pot society. It worked, and in many ways was a good idea, before non-Northerners started turning up. However, holding on to a unique, ancestral ethnic identity is more likely to discourage inter-ethnic mixing and thus preserve Colonial identity much more effectively. That shouldn't suggest a 12th-generation German-American should stop speaking English and throw on lederhosen every day, but they should know and appreciate their ancestral identity, in addition to their American home, and keep their blood in mind when choosing a partner and a way of life for their children. As American, and wider Colonial, identity owes its origins primarily to Germanic settlers to begin with, old-stock Colonials are in a unique and difficult situation when it comes cultural practices, and for this reason I do not oppose a reasonable mix of both.
    I agree. There is a reason why there are such names as New England, New York, Nova Scotia, New South Wales, New Sweden, with New France, New Netherland and New Brunswick also, apart from the generally non-White colonies of New Spain and New Archangel. This is the baseline of the native people; any other Europeans without colonial founder ancestry are encouraged to follow their own heritage as underclass supplements of other Whites and tolerate colonial hegemony.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deary View Post
    What do you think of Colonials (Americans, Canadians, Australians, etc.) who identify as European? Specifically, I refer to those whose families have been in the New World for some generations, did not inherit any European traditions but who try to practice and pass down the language, culture and history of their distant ancestors and even wish to move to Europe. Europeans, do you accept these people as one of your own, and Colonials, how do they make you feel? Why and amongst who do you believe this trend occurs and is it detrimental to our country and the countries of others?

    Americans do not identify with Europe. There are a few Australians and Canadians who identify as being ''Commonwealth Nationalists''.

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernBoy View Post
    They are bothersome. We have plenty of uniquely American traditions of which to be proud. By instilling "European" traditions in Americans of mixed nationality, you weaken the unity amongst Americans of European descent and strengthen the idea that multiculturalism is a healthy way of thinking.
    Incorrect. Maybe in the South but there is little identity elsewhere in the United States. The only culture I see in the PNW is ''Globalized Germanic''

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    This topic, in part, reminds me of one on hyphenated-Americanism a few years back.
    "I do not know what horrified me most at that time: the economic misery of my companions, their moral and ethical coarseness, or the low level of their intellectual development." Adolf Hitler, Mein Kampf

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    Quote: Americans do not identify with Europe.

    I beg to differ. Some of us do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGreatest View Post
    Americans do not identify with Europe. There are a few Australians and Canadians who identify as being ''Commonwealth Nationalists''.
    I identify as such. I believe that Australia, Canada and NZ share a common identity and because of such immigration to my country from these countries would be less detrimental than any others (excluding the UK). Australia, Canada and NZ all share a common identity and I feel that this makes it easier for us to identify, as a nation, as being European in culture and outlook.

    The US on the other hand appears to lack that European national identity (I cannot think of a more accurate term at the moment). Sure, you have the WASP, but I think that European identity in the US is mostly a family affair as opposed to a national feeling.

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