Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Viking Knitwear

  1. #1
    Senior Member Vanir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Last Online
    Saturday, July 14th, 2007 @ 09:32 AM
    Gender
    Posts
    811
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post

    Viking Knitwear

    A little off the beaten track but here's a lady who makes Viking knitwear, and indeed seems very passionate and serious about it.

    http://www.ingenkonst.se/viking_e.htm

    I like seeing industrious folkish creativity, it cheers me up.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Last Online
    Wednesday, April 13th, 2011 @ 07:55 AM
    Ethnicity
    German
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Gender
    Posts
    701
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    This looks great, I'm going to have a further look in the site.



    :annoysigr

    It's sad they have to do this to avoid being called racist. Oh well.

  3. #3
    New Member Hrafnkat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Last Online
    Sunday, August 1st, 2010 @ 07:51 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    England, Lowland Scotland, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Norway, other Scandinavian
    Country
    Vinland Vinland
    State
    Washington Washington
    Gender
    Age
    44
    Family
    Single adult
    Religion
    Ásatrú (folkish)
    Posts
    8
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Viking Knitwear

    Quote Originally Posted by Vanir View Post
    A little off the beaten track but here's a lady who makes Viking knitwear, and indeed seems very passionate and serious about it.

    http://www.ingenkonst.se/viking_e.htm

    I like seeing industrious folkish creativity, it cheers me up.

    Lavold's book is truly amazing! She has 3 more smaller paperback volumes in her "Viking Knitwear" collection, but only book called #18 is currently in print, as well as her original hardcover.

    Anyone who has any interest in cabled knitting should check out her work, she invented a new technique for beginning and ending motifs without wrinkling the background material.

    Here is a sweater (Ragna) from Lavold's book that I made:

    The whole sweater laid out flat:




    The altered finished front neckline:




    The right sleeve showing the added shoulder strap and design down sleeve:




    And because I am not, ah, flat-chested, I knit an extra repeat of the pattern in the front of the sweater body (10 repeats rather than 9) to give an extra 3" in length to the front, which since it was an all-wool yarn (Cascade 220), I pinned like a dart and shrunk out the excess, with bowls under the front to give the sweater shaping in the bosom.

    You can see in this picture the left side has been shrunk in (with an ordinary steam-iron held above the wool), and the right is wrinkled showing the gathering between the pins:



    Once the side-seams were sewn, it was impossible to tell that the "dart" was even there.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ragna finished front neckline.JPG 
Views:	48 
Size:	67.4 KB 
ID:	104716   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ragna Flat.JPG 
Views:	40 
Size:	72.0 KB 
ID:	104717   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ragna Right Sleeve.JPG 
Views:	40 
Size:	77.8 KB 
ID:	104718   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ragna Steaming wrinkles out of front.JPG 
Views:	41 
Size:	81.8 KB 
ID:	104719  


  4. #4
    New Member Hrafnkat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Last Online
    Sunday, August 1st, 2010 @ 07:51 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    England, Lowland Scotland, Germany, Holland, Ireland, Norway, other Scandinavian
    Country
    Vinland Vinland
    State
    Washington Washington
    Gender
    Age
    44
    Family
    Single adult
    Religion
    Ásatrú (folkish)
    Posts
    8
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    I should be more detailed for anyone who is interested in Lavold's work and has not yet read her books.

    Elsebeth Lavold is a modern Swedish knitwear designer, rather prolific since she has something like 20 books now (!) in her collection.

    Of these, the original hardcover book "Viking Patterns for Knitting" (on sale currently at Amazon.com), and books one, nine, and eighteen in her softback "designer's choice" collection are the only ones dealing with knotwork knitting. The other books are all contemporary designs - pretty, but probably not what people reading this would be looking for.

    She is inspired by historical wood and stone carving, and metalwork - indeed she sketches sword hilts and shows pictures of brooches, with the corresponding knotwork knitting pattern. She also poses some of her models artfully draped against runestones (nice to live in Sweden!).

    From her introduction: "... I have tried to manage a cultural heritage by translating old patterns to the newer technique of knitting - the Vikings would certainly have done it themselves if they had knitted...."

    Unfortunately books one and nine appear to be out of print at this time. Lavold actually tours with her Viking knitwear to museums as art exhibits (they came to the Nordic Heritage museum in Seattle for example), so I have hope that they will be reprinted in the future. I do already own them, but my grandmother wants copies now after I showed them to her, and I can't find them anywhere!

    For someone trying her techniques for the first time, I would recommend the original book "Viking Patterns for Knitting" - it is the most comprehensive as far as showing how to translate your own designs into charted knitting, in addition to her many already-charted knots, and gives a more comprehensive history of both the original artforms and her own take on them.

    The "designer's choice" books are a compilation of patterns that had been avaiable as kits from her website, bound into books and with instructions in English. Her books are translated from Swedish, which causes some odd phrasing, but are not difficult to understand.

    For those of you who equate "Scandinavian knitting" with Lopi-brand circular yoked sweaters, or Dale of Norway stranded-knitting ski sweaters, Lavold's work is nothing like that. She does strong cabled knotwork designs against a reverse stocking-stitch background in single colours.

    Absolutely gorgeous!

  5. #5
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    5,925
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    622
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    505
    Thanked in
    231 Posts
    The vikings didnt have modern knitting. They used nålebinding and brikkevev.

  6. #6
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ingvaeonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Last Online
    6 Days Ago @ 02:02 AM
    Ethnicity
    English/German combo
    Country
    Australia Australia
    Location
    Eastern Australia
    Gender
    Zodiac Sign
    Sagittarius
    Posts
    1,752
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    12
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    18
    Thanked in
    15 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Hersir View Post
    The vikings didnt have modern knitting. They used nålebinding and brikkevev.
    I didn't know that. Could you explain the meanings of these Norse words? Nålebinding, I will guess, is a kind of sewing with a needle. What say you, Hersir?

  7. #7
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    5,925
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    622
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    505
    Thanked in
    231 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ingvaeonic View Post
    I didn't know that. Could you explain the meanings of these Norse words? Nålebinding, I will guess, is a kind of sewing with a needle. What say you, Hersir?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nålebinding "binding with a needle" or "needle-binding"

    Brikkevev


    Nowadays they use plastic or bone for it, but I guess wood works if it's hardwood. The one's from the Oseberg find was in wood. http://www.google.com/search?q=brikk...ed=0CAsQ_AUoAQ

    http://hjerleid.trykker.com/2010/02/...osebergfunnet/

    The weave looks pretty good on your viking tunica.

  8. #8
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ingvaeonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Last Online
    6 Days Ago @ 02:02 AM
    Ethnicity
    English/German combo
    Country
    Australia Australia
    Location
    Eastern Australia
    Gender
    Zodiac Sign
    Sagittarius
    Posts
    1,752
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    12
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    18
    Thanked in
    15 Posts
    Cheers, Hersir. The clothing and fabric made with both methods is beautifully executed. Viking women must have been highly skilled.

  9. #9
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    5,925
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    622
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    505
    Thanked in
    231 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ingvaeonic View Post
    Cheers, Hersir. The clothing and fabric made with both methods is beautifully executed. Viking women must have been highly skilled.
    They were We can't reproduce some of the stuff, like the very thin thread in the Oseberg textiles, because the technigue has been lost to us. Maybe there's someone in inner Mongolia who still knows how to do it

  10. #10
    Love Conquers All
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Elfriede's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    German
    Gender
    Posts
    291
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Speaking of naalbinding, let me just say that it is not for the easily intimidated! I've spent over an hour slaving over little pieces of yarn only to come up with a little chunky rope-looking thing. I'm a little better at it now but I really had to teach myself to do it. I can imagine that it would take years and years to be really great at it, never mind the fact that it's better to use home-spun yarn for it. Actually as a present for myself I bought a (fossilized!) walrus tusk naalbinding needle. It's very cool!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Thursday, April 29th, 2010, 08:28 PM
  2. viking painting
    By svolværing in forum Visual Arts & Aesthetics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sunday, August 19th, 2007, 05:45 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •