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Thread: Symbols of Pan-Germanism?

  1. #1
    Tribuno
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    Symbols of Pan-Germanism?

    I'm interested to hear if there are any famous symbols of Pan-Germanism as a political idea?

    (With "Pan-Germanism", I'm referring to the general movement to unify all ethnic Germans abroad within the borders of one German nation. Such as the Austrians and the Sudeten-Germans.)

    I once heard that the cornflower is a bit of an unofficial symbol, being one of the national flowers of Germany. Is there any others?

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    Senior Member Alfadur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tribuno View Post
    I once heard that the cornflower is a bit of an unofficial symbol, being one of the national flowers of Germany. Is there any others?
    I don't think there was ever a "Pan-Germanist" official symbol, apart from the Third Reich swastika - and I'm assuming that's not what you were referring to.

    It's interesting that you mention the blue cornflower, because it was indeed an unofficial symbol with Pan-German connotations among the Danube Swabians and the ethnic Germans in Hungary.

    The cornflower was used as the insignia by the SS volunteer legion Maria Theresia, which consisted of Germans living in Hungary. (The ethnic Hungarians had their own legion, called Hunyadi. Both battalions were named after national heroes.)



    This is what I got from the German wikipedia page, when I looked up "Kornblume" on there (loosely translated by me):

    The cornflower was used around 1879 for the "Schönerer" movement in Austria (an anti-Semitic and pan-German movement). Because of this, wearing the cornflower was temporarily against the law and was regarded as "treason." The Schönerer movement saw the cornflower as a symbol of German loyalty. From 1933 to 1938, the cornflower was the distinctive mark of the then illegal Nazi Party (in Austria? The link provided in the citation refers only to the National Freedom Party's meetings.).

    Members of the Austrian National Freedom Party have worn the cornflower to inaugural meetings since 2006 in addition to their white and red ribbon.


    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kornblume

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    I can just think of the oak leaf which has been used since roughly 12 centuries by several countries and states, beginning by the teutonic knights, then by the German revolutionaries in central Europe during the 1840's and still by the Federal Republic of Germany, since the oak (as a "German tree) represents loyalty and homeland. I think other countries like the UK and the US use this symbol too, but I'd rather doubt that it has anything like a "Pan-Germanic" meaning there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alfadur View Post
    I don't think there was ever a "Pan-Germanist" official symbol, apart from the Third Reich swastika - and I'm assuming that's not what you were referring to.
    The swastika was widely used by pan-Germanists in several countries around the turn of the century (19/20th), thus pre-WW1.

    Notice the examples and old photos in the beginning of part1

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=


    Swastika= rallying emblem for a Germanic/Aryan supremacy order.

    A dangerous symbol in so far, as it per definition would counter non-Aryan
    wealth and political power. Thus it will lead automatically to race war in non-homogeneous nations such as the US.

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