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Thread: Moving from the UK to Germany: "Prove I Can Support Myself"?

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    Moving from the UK to Germany: "Prove I Can Support Myself"?

    Ive just made tentative inquiries about moving from the UK to Germany and have been told one of the requirements is:- "you have to prove you can support yourself"

    Now whilst I agree with such a requirement, it has set me wondering, do all those 3rd world immigrants Germany has to accept prove that they can support themselves?, or is it cause Iam white?

    I also thought citizens of member countries of the EU could live where they liked?

    I dont think here in the UK that we ask people from say, Poland, if they can support themselves?

    Another question, though my Father is German, I have only ever had British citizenship and a passport, can I obtain duel nationality and how would I go about such, is it advantageous?

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    If you are a EU-citizen you can go wherever you please (in the EU) and nobody can tell you to leave or stay away. And you don't need to proof either, whether you can live on your own or not.

    Third-world immigrants often come here with a refugee-status and seek asylum. When their asylum expires they either must leave or can get a prolongation. Some also apply for a permanent residency here, but I don't know about the exact details. It can be hard to get rid of them again because they have no passport and therefore can't be sent back or they are "Politically prosecuted" and cannot be forced back as it would endager their lives.

    Concerning a dual citizenship, I don't see any distinct advantage. With your British passport you can go anywhere in the EU you like and work there. The only thing you can't do is vote, but this shouldn't be too big a loss

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    Looking at the URL http://www.electoralcommission.org.u...r-registration it appears that other EU citizens can register and vote in UK?????

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralf Rossa View Post
    I also thought citizens of member countries of the EU could live where they liked?
    Correct, free movement of workers. Having a job prospect in expectation in the country you aim to move to is always advantageous for your case, thus.

    Another question, though my Father is German, I have only ever had British citizenship and a passport, can I obtain duel nationality and how would I go about such, is it advantageous?
    Considering your father is a German national, ius sanguinis (still one applicable way to attain citizenship) may still count for you; the son of any married male German national at the time of birth becomes a German automatically as far as I am aware.

    Technically, one could argue you renounced that when you took British citizenship as Britain and Germany do not have a bi-lateral agreement on dual citizenship. However, having close ties to Germany, you might be advantaged into fast-tracking your application and not having to wait for basically a decade to get your passport; this is how many Spätaussiedler families from Silesia did it.

    If you're lucky, you could make a case to get it right away; even though Austria and Germany (!!!!!) don't have bi-lateral agreements either and even though I've not been ordinarily resident in Germany at any time in my life, and even though it is actually my mother who is the German national (dual as well), I have been a dual citizen of Austria and Germany for as long as I can think.
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
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    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralf Rossa View Post
    Another question, though my Father is German, I have only ever had British citizenship and a passport, can I obtain duel nationality and how would I go about such, is it advantageous?
    I've actually been looking into this the last few days, and this is what I've found from the German Consulate General in Toronto.


    Determining German citizenship

    If you are Canadian citizen and would like to find out if you are eligible to apply for a German passport, there are some basic principles of the German law of citizenship that you should familiarize yourself with first:

    German citizenship is mainly acquired and passed on through descent from a German parent. The parent has to be German citizen at the time of the birth of the child. Children who are born to former German citizens do not acquire the German citizenship. In addition, for children born before January 1st, 1975 to parents who were married to each other at the time of the birth, it was mandatory that the father was a German citizen in order for the child to acquire the German citizenship.

    Persons who were born in Germany before the year 2000 to non-German parents did not obtain German citizenship at the time of their birth and are not eligible for a German passport. Currently, only children born in or after the year 2000 to long-term residents of Germany could or can under certain circumstances receive the German citizenship.

    The German rules on citizenship are based on the principle of avoiding dual citizenship. This means that a German citizen who voluntarily applies for and accepts a foreign nationality on principle loses the German nationality automatically. This rule does not apply to Germans who receive the other citizenship by law (e.g. children born in Canada to parents that hold German citizenship at the time of the birth of the child may be dual citizens by law), or who applied for and received a citizenship of a member state of the European Union or Switzerland after August of 2007.

    As an example: If your father was once a German citizen, but was naturalized Canadian before you were born. He lost his German citizenship when he accepted the Canadian citizenship and was therefore unable to pass on the German citizenship to you.

    Am I entitled to a German passport?

    German passports are only issued to German citizens. To determine whether or not you are eligible for a German passprt, research in your family history may be necessary. The following page gives you guidelines that can help determine if a German passport can be issued to you or one of your family members.


    http://www.toronto.diplo.de/Vertretu...tizenship.html

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    So I inquired from the German Embassy here if I was entitled to German citizenship on the basis of my Father being German, I was informed that due to my parents being unmarried, the answer was no, though if the same situation occurred after 1st July 1993, the answer would have been yes as it was no longer a requirement that parents be married.

    Seems a bit of discrimination going on here, why are people born before July 1993 any better than ones born before?

    Still, at least I can consider myself a Prussian as their is nobody that can tell me Ian not!

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