Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Body of Infamous Aussie Outlaw Ned Kelly Found

  1. #1
    Datter av Norge
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ælfrun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian-Canadian
    Gender
    Posts
    1,054
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts

    Body of Infamous Aussie Outlaw Ned Kelly Found

    The headless remains of the infamous Australian outlaw Ned Kelly have finally been identified, officials said Thursday, solving a mystery dating back more than 130 years.

    Considered by some to be a cold-blooded murderer, Kelly was also seen as a folk hero and symbol of Irish-Australian defiance against the British authorities.

    After killing three policemen, the outlaw was captured in Victoria state in 1880 and hanged for murder at Old Melbourne Gaol in November of the same year. But his body went missing after it was thrown into a mass grave.

    The bodies in the grave were transferred from the gaol to Pentridge Prison in 1929 and then exhumed again in 2009. The investigation into Kelly began when a skull believed to be his -- and stolen in 1978 -- was rediscovered.
    Doctors and scientists at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine identified his body after a DNA sample was taken from Melbourne teacher Leigh Olver, Kelly's sister Ellen's great-grandson.

    "The wear and tear of the skeleton is a little bit more than would be expected for a 25-year-old today," said institute director Professor Stephen Cordner.
    "But such was Ned's life, this is hardly surprising."

    However, tests found the skull believed to Kelly's was in fact not his.
    Victoria's Attorney-General Robert Clark said he was amazed by the work of the forensic scientists.

    "This is an extraordinary achievement by our forensic team," he said.
    "To think a group of scientists could identify the body of a man who was executed more than 130 years ago, moved and buried in a haphazard fashion among 33 other prisoners, most of whom are not identified, is amazing."
    Believed to have been born in 1854 or 1855, Kelly became an outlaw two years before he was hanged, taking on corrupt police and greedy land barons.

    He survived a shootout with police in 1878 that saw him, his brother Dan, and friends Joe Byrne and Steve Hart slapped with an 8,000-pound bounty -- the largest reward ever offered in the British Empire -- for anyone who found them, dead or alive.

    Over the next 18 months, the Kelly Gang held up country towns and robbed their banks, becoming folk heroes to the masses.
    In a final gunbattle at Glenrowan, three of the gang members died and Kelly, dressed in home-made plate metal armour and helmet, was wounded and arrested.

    According to local reports, bullet wounds he suffered to his elbow, thigh and foot are still noticeable in the skeletal remains.
    Olver, who supplied the DNA, said he was relieved to finally have some closure.

    "It's such a great relief to finally have this side of the story resolved," he told reporters, adding that he hoped a suitable resting place could be found for his colourful relative.

    "A place of dignity, a place very appropriate. Where that is will be determined later," he said.

    The exploits of Kelly and his gang have been the subject of numerous films and television series.

    Rolling Stone Mick Jagger played the lead role in the 1970 movie "Ned Kelly" while Heath Ledger starred as the bandit in a 2003 remake that also featured Orlando Bloom and Geoffrey Rush.
    He has also been the inspiration for many books, most notably Peter Carey's novel "True History of the Kelly Gang", which won the 2001 Booker Prize.
    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/body-infamo...002524804.html
    All things must come to the soul from it's roots, from where it is planted. The that is beside the running water is fresher, and gives more fruit.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Wychaert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Last Online
    Wednesday, July 10th, 2019 @ 04:19 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Dutch
    Ancestry
    Gelderland
    Subrace
    Borreby/Dalofaelid/Nordid
    Country
    Netherlands Netherlands
    State
    Gelderland Gelderland
    Location
    Betuwenaar in Salland
    Gender
    Family
    Married parent
    Politics
    Volks
    Religion
    Odalist
    Posts
    661
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    156
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    94
    Thanked in
    27 Posts
    If only Ozhammer was here!

    ''Ginds de Waal, daar weer de IJssel, dan de Maas en ook de Rijn. Geeft ons recht om heel ons leven trots op Gelderland te zijn.''

  3. #3
    Senior Member Erlkönig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Last Online
    Saturday, August 25th, 2012 @ 03:49 PM
    Ethnicity
    West Prussia
    Ancestry
    From the roots of the Mountain.
    Country
    Australia Australia
    Gender
    Age
    30
    Occupation
    Student.
    Posts
    281
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    I don't understand how a people whose culture is central to a 'convict heritage' idea can aspire to accomplish anything.
    Life is a well of delight; but where the rabble also drink, there all fountains are poisoned.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Meister's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Last Online
    Sunday, August 4th, 2019 @ 04:05 PM
    Status
    Prolonged Absence
    Ethnicity
    German
    Subrace
    Don't know
    Country
    Australia Australia
    Gender
    Posts
    692
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    57
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    74
    Thanked in
    42 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Erlkönig View Post
    I don't understand how a people whose culture is central to a 'convict heritage' idea can aspire to accomplish anything.
    Not really a convict heritage, in fact more convicts were sent to other countries than Australia.

    Ned Kelly has been romanticized and idealised as an Irish rebel who fought against English injustice. Opinion is divided whether he was that or just a murderer and thief.

    I wouldn't mind betting that if he did all the same things but was English, Scottish or Welsh it would be a different story!
    I grew up on a belief of honour, courage and the old world values. The world isn't about that anymore, preferring to die a slow death of fast food and cheap thrills.

  5. #5
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    The Horned God's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    Friday, June 30th, 2017 @ 09:09 PM
    Ethnicity
    Irish
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Country
    Other Other
    Location
    Ireland
    Gender
    Age
    41
    Family
    Single adult
    Posts
    2,248
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    8
    Thanked in
    8 Posts
    I want to point out that the 3 policemen Kelly killed were named Lonigan, Scanlon and Kennedy. All Irish surnames.

    In particular there was a long standing enmity between Kelly and Lonigan;

    In September 1877 Ned was arrested for drunkenness. While being escorted by four policemen he broke free and ran into a shop. The police tried to subdue him but failed and Ned later gave himself up to a Justice of the Peace and was fined. During the incident Constable Lonigan, who Ned was to later shoot dead, "black-balled" him (grabbed and squeezed his testicles). Legend has it that Ned told Lonigan "If I ever shoot a man, Lonigan, it'll be you!".

    Wkipedia.
    Close observation may result in feelings of horror, wonder and awe at world you find yourself inhabiting.

  6. #6
    Senior Member paraplethon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 @ 04:55 AM
    Ethnicity
    Irish-Welsh-Scots
    Country
    Australia Australia
    State
    Tasmania Tasmania
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    Green Right
    Posts
    290
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Erlkönig View Post
    I don't understand how a people whose culture is central to a 'convict heritage' idea can aspire to accomplish anything.
    Perhaps you should try reading a bit of John Hirst instead of Robert Hughes.

  7. #7
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    The Horned God's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    Friday, June 30th, 2017 @ 09:09 PM
    Ethnicity
    Irish
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Country
    Other Other
    Location
    Ireland
    Gender
    Age
    41
    Family
    Single adult
    Posts
    2,248
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    8
    Thanked in
    8 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by paraplethon View Post
    Perhaps you should try reading a bit of John Hirst instead of Robert Hughes.
    Which John Hirst are you referring to and which John Hughes? The art critic?
    Close observation may result in feelings of horror, wonder and awe at world you find yourself inhabiting.

  8. #8
    Senior Member paraplethon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 @ 04:55 AM
    Ethnicity
    Irish-Welsh-Scots
    Country
    Australia Australia
    State
    Tasmania Tasmania
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    Green Right
    Posts
    290
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by The Horned God View Post
    Which John Hirst are you referring to and which John Hughes? The art critic?
    John Hirst - historian who used to read at La Trobe Uni and whose work is much more fair minded and holistic than most Australian history these days. See for example his "Freedom on the Fatal Shore" for a thorough account of the political and economic operation of New South Wales through its convict period and the development of the local polity in that era.

    In comparison, see Robert Hughes widely read "The Fatal Shore" which focuses almost wholly on the harshest aspects of the penal system in operation at that time (Norfolk Island in particular receives much attention) which though accurate isn't a reflection of the convict system as a whole but the experience of a very small minority of those in the system at any one time. The problem being, Hughes version is the one that colours the whole period in its light - and is the one most commonly held by the general population.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Last Online
    8 Hours Ago @ 09:34 PM
    Ethnicity
    Celto-Germanic
    Ancestry
    Irish, Scottish
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Location
    North Ireland
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    National Socialist
    Religion
    Ethnic Catholic
    Posts
    1,312
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,478
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,579
    Thanked in
    852 Posts

    Ned Kelly



    Ned Kelly:


    • was born in June 1855, in Beveridge, Victoria




    • died at the gallows in Melbourne Gaol, on 11 November 1880




    • was the eldest son of eight children to John 'Red' Kelly and Ellen Quinn




    • as a child, saved another boy from drowning – the boy's family awarded him a green silk sash in recognition of his bravery




    • was believed by some to have been romantically involved with his cousin, Kate Lloyd, whom he visited just days before the siege in Glenrowan, and Steve Hart's sister Ettie Hart




    • uttered the famous last words 'Ah well, I suppose it has come to this' or 'Such is life', depending on which version of the story you hear






    How it all began


    Ned's criminal life started early. In 1869, when he was 14, he was arrested for allegedly assaulting a Chinese man. In 1870 he was arrested again, this time for being a suspected accomplice of bushranger Harry Power. Both these charges were dismissed, but it was too late: Ned had caught the attention of the police.


    Some years later, in April 1878, a police officer named Fitzpatrick went to the Kelly home, hoping to arrest Ned's brother Dan for stealing horses. Fitzpatrick claimed that Ned shot him in the wrist, although it's unclear whether Ned was even present at the time. Regardless, Ned's mother Ellen was arrested for aiding and abetting an attempted murder.


    Ellen was sentenced to three years' imprisonment by Judge Redmond Barry (who, two years later, also sentenced Ned to death by hanging). Ned and Dan went into hiding, and were later joined by Ned's friend Joe Byrne, and Dan's friend Steve Hart.



    Stringybark Creek


    In October 1878, Ned, Dan, Joe and Steve headed for Bullock Creek, where they hoped to earn enough money to appeal Ellen's sentence by running a whisky distillery.


    Shortly after their arrival, they received a warning that four policemen were planning to track them down. Ned rode around the surrounding areas and found sets of horse tracks leading to Stringybark Creek, close to where the gang was camped.


    The gang ambushed the police camp at Stringybark Creek and found two of the four policemen – Constables Lonigan and McIntyre – standing around a fire. The gang drew their guns and Ned shot Lonigan. McIntyre surrendered.


    When the other two policemen (Sergeant Kennedy and Constable Scanlan) returned, they refused to surrender to the gang. In the exchange of shots that followed, Ned killed Scanlan and, later, Kennedy. From this moment on, these four men were officially outlaws: the notorious Kelly gang.












    Ned Kelly's suit of armour


    The 'letterbox'-style headpiece and matching body armour worn by Ned Kelly and his gang are recognisable icons that feature prominently in the work of artists such as Sidney Nolan and Albert Tucker.


    In 1879 – the year before the Glenrowan siege and Ned's ultimate capture – the Kelly gang began constructing the suits of armour from mouldboards, the thick metal parts of a farmer's plough. They acquired these materials in various ways – some were bought; others were offered to them by sympathetic farmers; a few were stolen.


    The suits allowed the gang to walk away unharmed from close-range shooting, but they also served a less practical function: they made the gang members – Ned in particular – seem larger, more intimidating; even ghostly. The shock factor of the metal-clad Kelly would have been much to Ned's advantage during the Glenrowan siege.


    After the gang was killed and Ned captured, the police officers involved in the capture wanted to keep parts of the suits as souvenirs. Various pieces of the suits were separated, some making their way into private ownership. After years of research to determine which pieces belonged to which gang member, Ned Kelly's complete armour is now in the Library's collection.








    The Jerilderie letter


    There's no denying that Ned Kelly was a notorious criminal, feared around Victoria and beyond as a robber and murderer. Despite this, he had many sympathisers who believed that he was a symbol of the Australian spirit – an enduring underdog with the courage to challenge the authorities.


    This perception was no doubt fuelled by Kelly's Jerilderie letter, an 8000-word manifesto in which he justified his crimes and exposed what he viewed as unfair police persecution of himself and his family. Ned dictated the letter to Joe Byrne, who rewrote it in neater handwriting.


    The letter was written in 1879, around the time that the gang robbed the Jerilderie Bank. Ned gave the letter to the bank's accountant, Edward Living, and told him to have it published. Living, however, hopped on a train to Melbourne and passed the letter on to the police. The letter was eventually uncovered and presented at Kelly's trial in 1880.


    Despite its rough language and lack of grammar or punctuation, the Jerilderie letter offers a valuable insight into Ned Kelly's personality. It tells the story of a young man forced into crime by situations beyond his control.


    The events described in the letter also provided inspiration for Peter Carey's prize-winning novel, The true history of the Kelly gang.



    Kelly's death mask


    In the 19th century, it was common for plaster 'death masks' to be made of the face and skull of executed criminals. At the time, these masks served several purposes.


    Firstly, death masks were used for phrenological analysis, whereby the shape of a person's head was studied to determine their character traits. Secondly, they were often put on display in public places to serve as a reminder of the power of the police force.


    If ever the police wanted to show off its ability to capture a notorious criminal, it was after the execution of Ned Kelly, who – with his gang – had eluded police for years. So when Ned was hanged, several death masks were made of his skull.


    One Kelly death mask was put on display in Bourke Street, and was no doubt a source of fascination for the Victorian public. Another is now in the Library's collection.


    More to explore






    Ned Kelly fact sheet | State Library Victoria











    The astonishing life of Ned Kelly's mother


    While we know much about the iconic outlaw Ned Kelly, his mother Ellen Kelly has been largely overlooked by Australian writers and historians -- until now, with this vivid and compelling portrait by Grantlee Kieza, one of Australia's most popular biographers.


    When Ned Kelly's mother, Ellen, arrived in Melbourne in 1841 aged nine, British convict ships were still dumping their unhappy cargo in what was then known as the colony of New South Wales. By the time she died aged ninety-one in 1923, having outlived seven of her twelve children, motor cars plied the highway near her bush home north of Melbourne, and Australia was a modern, sovereign nation.


    Like so many pioneering women, Ellen, the wife of a convict, led a life of great hardship. Born in Ireland during a time of entrenched poverty and sectarian violence, she was a mother of seven when her husband died after months in a police lock-up. She lived through famine and drought, watched her babies die, listened through the prison wall while her eldest son was hanged and saw the charred remains of another of her children who'd died in a shoot-out with police. One son became Australia's most infamous (and ultimately most celebrated) outlaw; another became a highly decorated policeman, an honorary member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and a worldwide star on the rodeo circuit. Through it all, 'the notorious Mrs Kelly', as she was dubbed by Victoria's Assistant Police Commissioner, survived as best she could, like so many pioneering women of the time.


    By bestselling biographer Grantlee Kieza, Mrs Kelly is the astonishing story of one of Australia's most notorious women and her wild family, but it's also the story of the making of Australia, from struggling colony and backwater to modern nation.




  10. The Following User Says Thank You to jagdmesser For This Useful Post:


  11. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Last Online
    8 Hours Ago @ 09:34 PM
    Ethnicity
    Celto-Germanic
    Ancestry
    Irish, Scottish
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    Location
    North Ireland
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    National Socialist
    Religion
    Ethnic Catholic
    Posts
    1,312
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,478
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,579
    Thanked in
    852 Posts

    Ellen Kelly - Ned Kelly's mother.


    Ellen Kelly 1832 -1923



    Ellen Kelly, 1917
    State Library of Victoria, H2003.25/5


    Ellen Kelly (c.1832–1923), matriarch and mother of NedKelly, was born in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, fourth of eleven children of James Quinn, farmer, and his wife Mary, née McCluskey. Ellen had an adventurous spirit that rebelled against any confinement and led her often to play truant from school and roam the countryside—a practice that left her able to read but not to write, and with a lifelong affinity for horses and the land. The Quinns, then numbering ten, reached Port Phillip as assisted migrants in July 1841.


    After a period of menial work in Melbourne, James took the family north to rented farmland at Brunswick, then in 1849 a further 30 miles (48.3 km) to Wallan. Lively and slim with black hair and grey eyes, and an expert horsewoman, Ellen caught the eye of 30-year-old John 'Red' Kelly, an Irishman who had been transported to Van Diemen's Land for theft in 1841. Defying her father, Ellen took up with Red, and fell pregnant to him in May 1850. They married on 18 November at St Francis's Catholic Church, Melbourne, and moved into their own cottage on the Quinns' Wallan property.


    Their first-born, a girl, survived only briefly. In 1853 Red set off alone to the goldfields, where he made enough to buy a farm near Beveridge. Ellen had a daughter Anne and in December 1854 a son, who was named Edward after Red's brother. The extensive Quinn and Kelly clans tended to skirt the fringes of the law, and for Ellen and Red financial difficulties, several moves, further births and mounting police attention set a definitive pattern. Red began drinking heavily. In 1865 he stole a calf and served four months in gaol. The following year he died, an alcoholic, of oedema, leaving Ellen with seven children aged from 18 months to 13 years.


    As she struggled to raise her children on inferior farmland, she became notorious for her sometimes-violent temper, resulting in several court appearances. After moving her family into the far north-east of Victoria to stay near relations, she leased a selection of 88 acres (35.6 ha) there and sold 'sly grog' to make ends meet. The bushranger Harry Power became a family friend, introducing 14-year-old Ned to the life of a bandit. In 1869 Ellen took a lover, Bill Frost, and became pregnant, he promising marriage. The baby—her ninth—was born in March 1870, but Frost did not keep his word. Trouble with the law increased, with several of Ellen's siblings and offspring suffering periods of imprisonment.


    Late in 1872, with Ned in prison, she met George King, a 23-year-old Californian horse-thief, and once more fell pregnant. On 19 February 1874 they married at Benalla with Primitive Methodist forms. She had three children by King. Alice, the last, was born in April 1878, six months after King abruptly deserted them, and only days before Constable Fitzpatrick arrived at the Kelly home to arrest Ellen's son Dan for horse-theft. Set upon by Ellen (wielding a spade) and probably Ned, Fitzpatrick brought charges of attempted murder; she was sentenced to three years in prison.


    A model prisoner, Ellen was allowed, after Dan's death and Ned's capture, to visit Ned in the prison hospital and later in the cells, seeing him for the last time on the eve of his execution. According to tradition, she said 'Mind you die like a Kelly, son'. Released in February 1881, Ellen returned home to scenes of incipient civil rebellion; the authorities feared a pro-Kelly uprising. Constable Robert Graham, however, gained her confidence and persuaded her to calm her sympathizers. She settled down to become, for the first time in her life, a respectable community identity—although she was never able to rise to even modest prosperity.


    Her daughters Maggie and Kate died in the late 1890s, leaving Ellen to raise three of her grandchildren, helped by her son James. He continued to live with her, caring for her in her old age. She died on 27 March 1923 at Greta West and was buried in Greta cemetery with Catholic rites. Of her twelve children, a son and daughter of her first marriage and a son and two daughters of her second survived her.


    Select Bibliography


    • J. McQuilton, The Kelly Outbreak 1878-1880 (Melb, 1979)
    • M. Lake and F. Kelly, Double Time (Melb, 1985)
    • I. Jones, Ned Kelly: A Short Life (Melb, 1995)
    • N. Kelly, The Jerilderie Letter (Melb, 2001).




    by Jacqueline Zara Wilson


    This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Supplementary Volume, (MUP), 2005

    Biography - Ellen Kelly - Australian Dictionary of Biography



    09 XI 2019.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to jagdmesser For This Useful Post:


Similar Threads

  1. Recording of German Officers Who Found Hitler's Body is Made Public
    By Nachtengel in forum Modern Age & Contemporary History
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Saturday, January 16th, 2010, 02:07 AM
  2. Australian Farmer Claims Skull is Ned Kelly's
    By Aragorn in forum Australia & New Zealand
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Saturday, November 14th, 2009, 06:55 AM
  3. Replies: 21
    Last Post: Tuesday, August 5th, 2008, 08:38 PM
  4. Classify Ned Kelly
    By Dropkick in forum Anthropological Taxonomy
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Saturday, December 23rd, 2006, 02:09 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •