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Thread: What Were Some Major Cultural Similarities/Differences Between the Indo-European-Speaking European Tribes?

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    What Were Some Major Cultural Similarities/Differences Between the Indo-European-Speaking European Tribes?

    My understanding is that Celts, Germanics, Balts, and Slavs all had remarkably similar cultures before starting to diverge after the introduction of Christianity, while the Latins and Hellens always had slightly different cultures form the people of the north. What were some of the most significant similarities and differences between these European families? How close were Germanic and Slavic, Germanic and Celtic, Germanic and Baltic cultures, etc?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolichocephalic Prince View Post
    My understanding is that Celts, Germanics, Balts, and Slavs all had remarkably similar cultures before starting to diverge after the introduction of Christianity, while the Latins and Hellens always had slightly different cultures form the people of the north. What were some of the most significant similarities and differences between these European families? How close were Germanic and Slavic, Germanic and Celtic, Germanic and Baltic cultures, etc?
    If you go back to about 500 BC the difference would have been small. Similar religious belief although about a diffident set of Gods. Diffident aesthetic but some similarities in group structure and warrior culture not to mention drinking tradition.

    The religion may have been the biggest difference from Celt and Germanic. I think the Slavs were closer to Germanic in that respect as were the Baltic although I am more an expert on the Romans and Greeks.

    Since most of what we know comes from the Romans with small contributions from the Greeks it is clear they did distinguish between German and Celt but did not seem to know much with regards to the Baltic and German, having said that they had less direct contact. They viewed them all as Savages. Still even then the Germans are seen as better than the Celt.

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    1. Language: All Europeans share an intriguing variety of words with the same meaning and roots, more or less. Origins lie in the Aryan heimat in Central Asia, subsequently creating the language of Sanskrit as well. Effectively, we have a related culture that spans thousands of miles from Punjab to Ireland, a patchwork of dialects of the Indo-European tongue.

    2. Symbolism: most all Europeans families share the symbol, most notably, of the Swastika and related symbols in their respective manner. This is of course a carryover from Aryan origins so there's bound to be a connection.

    3. Religion: All ancient pagan faiths were derived from a proto-indo-European belief system and subsequently adapted into the myths and legend of the tribes given. Thor, Tarannis, Jupiter, Zeus, Perun, Indra all have the same roles and similarities in characteristics. Same goes for the other members of the pantheons.

    Caesar also noted that the Celtic and Germanic tribes all pay homage to the "Sky Father" (Deus Pater in Latin, Dyaus Pita in Sanskrit)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia
    Etymologically, the name Dyaus is derived from Proto-Indo-European root word morpheme *dyeu- (zero-grade forms *dyu- and *diw-) with the meaning 'to shine'. Words related to Dyaus in Sanskrit include divasa 'day', divya 'divine, celestial', dyota 'light, shining', etc.

    Dyauṣ Pitṛ is the Sanskrit version of the Proto-Indo-European sky god concept personified by *Dyeus, who appears in many other Indo-European religions with similar attributes. Dyeus was addressed as Dyeu Ph2ter, literally "Sky Father" or "shining father", as reflected in Latin Jupiter, Dispater, and deus pater, Greek Zeus pater.

    In his aspect as a father god, his consort was Pltwih2 Mh2ter, "Earth Mother". Related names to Dyauṣ Pitṛ appear in the Greek as Zeus Pater (accusative Día, genitive Diós), in Latin as Jupiter (from archaic Latin Iovis Pater, "Sky father"), in Slavic mythology as Div, and Germanic and Norse mythology as Tyr or Ziu.
    4. Genetic kinship: Of course we all know that we Europeans are related by blood, which would obviously indicate a common lineage.

    5. Location: This factor ultimately decides the schism in Pan-Euro cultures. Different locales offer different world-perspectives and contact with other peoples, thus changing the culture of a people in just about every conceivable way. Look at America vs. Europe, same people more or less, vastly different cultures. There are plenty of theories on how close Germanic and Celtic and Slavic cultures were, some suggesting the Celts ave the Germans their culture, or the other way around, but we can be sure they are related in more ways than one. Given the cultures archaeologically recognized we can deduce that with time since it's inception, differences grew rather than shrank, thus creating the world we recognize today.

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