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Thread: Cranial variation in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands

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    Post Cranial variation in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands

    Am J Phys Anthropol. 1996 Mar;99(3):413-28.


    Cranial variation in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands: inferences about the history of the population.

    Fox CL, Gonzalez Martin A, Vives Civit S.

    Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Biology, Barcelona, Spain.

    A multivariate analysis of four prehistoric and nine historic populations from the Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Islands with large sample sizes (n > 30 individuals for the neurocranium and n > 15 for the facial skeleton) is presented, considering 874 male and 557 female skulls and using 20 craniometric measurements. Cluster analyses have been undertaken using the squared Euclidean distance as a measure of proximity and the average linkage between groups (UPGMA), and neighbor-joining algorithms as a branching method, and a bootstrap analysis was used to assess the robustness of the clustering topology. The study was complemented with a principal coordinate analysis and with the application of the Mantel test to measure the degree of correspondence between the information furnished by the female and the male samples. The analyses show that the main source of morphometric variability in the Iberian Peninsula is the Basque population. The second source of variation is provided by two populations (Muslims and Jews), different from the rest from an archaeological and cultural point of view, and can probably be attributed to influences from sub-Saharan Africa. The massive deportations of the Jews in 1492 and of the Moors between the 15th and 17th centuries may have erased this source of variability from the present population of the Iberian Peninsula. The remaining studied populations, including samples from Castile, Cantabria, Andalusia, Catalonia and Balearic Islands, are grouped together, showing a notable morphological homogeneity, despite their temporal and geographic heterogeneity. These results are in general agreement with those obtained in synthetic maps, by analyzing multiple genetic markers. In such studies, the Basque population is described as the main source of genetic variability, not only in the Iberian Peninsula, but also in Western Europe.

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    Post Re: Cranial variation in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands

    More informations, probably the full article would be really nice, because would like to see how they see the Basque influence in detail.
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