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Thread: Y-Chromosome Mismatch Distributions in Europe

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    Y-Chromosome Mismatch Distributions in Europe

    Mol Biol Evol. 2001 Jul;18(7):1259-71.


    Mol Biol Evol. 2001 Jul;18(7):1259-71.


    Y-chromosome mismatch distributions in Europe.

    Pereira L, Dupanloup I, Rosser ZH, Jobling MA, Barbujani G.

    Instituto de Patologia e Imunologia Molecular da Universidade do Porto and Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.

    Ancient demographic events can be inferred from the distribution of pairwise sequence differences (or mismatches) among individuals. We analyzed a database of 3,677 Y chromosomes typed for 11 biallelic markers in 48 human populations from Europe and the Mediterranean area. Contrary to what is observed in the analysis of mitochondrial polymorphisms, Tajima's test was insignificant for most Y-chromosome samples, and in 47 populations the mismatch distributions had multiple peaks. Taken at face value, these results would suggest either (1) that the size of the male population stayed essentially constant over time, while the female population size increased, or (2) that different selective regimes have shaped mitochondrial and Y-chromosome diversity, leading to an excess of rare alleles only in the mitochondrial genome. An alternative explanation would be that the 11 variable sites of the Y chromosome do not provide sufficient statistical power, so a comparison with mitochondrial data (where more than 200 variable sites are studied in Europe) is impossible at present. To discriminate between these possibilities, we repeatedly analyzed a European mitochondrial database, each time considering only 11 variable sites, and we estimated mismatch distributions in stable and growing populations, generated by simulating coalescent processes. Along with theoretical considerations, these tests suggest that the difference between the mismatch distributions inferred from mitochondrial and Y-chromosome data are not a statistical artifact. Therefore, the observed mismatch distributions appear to reflect different underlying demographic histories and/or selective pressures for maternally and paternally transmitted loci.
    Y-chromosome mismatch distributions in Europe.

    Pereira L, Dupanloup I, Rosser ZH, Jobling MA, Barbujani G.

    Instituto de Patologia e Imunologia Molecular da Universidade do Porto and Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.

    Ancient demographic events can be inferred from the distribution of pairwise sequence differences (or mismatches) among individuals. We analyzed a database of 3,677 Y chromosomes typed for 11 biallelic markers in 48 human populations from Europe and the Mediterranean area. Contrary to what is observed in the analysis of mitochondrial polymorphisms, Tajima's test was insignificant for most Y-chromosome samples, and in 47 populations the mismatch distributions had multiple peaks. Taken at face value, these results would suggest either (1) that the size of the male population stayed essentially constant over time, while the female population size increased, or (2) that different selective regimes have shaped mitochondrial and Y-chromosome diversity, leading to an excess of rare alleles only in the mitochondrial genome. An alternative explanation would be that the 11 variable sites of the Y chromosome do not provide sufficient statistical power, so a comparison with mitochondrial data (where more than 200 variable sites are studied in Europe) is impossible at present. To discriminate between these possibilities, we repeatedly analyzed a European mitochondrial database, each time considering only 11 variable sites, and we estimated mismatch distributions in stable and growing populations, generated by simulating coalescent processes. Along with theoretical considerations, these tests suggest that the difference between the mismatch distributions inferred from mitochondrial and Y-chromosome data are not a statistical artifact. Therefore, the observed mismatch distributions appear to reflect different underlying demographic histories and/or selective pressures for maternally and paternally transmitted loci.

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    Post Re: Y-chromosome mismatch distributions in Europe.

    Female choice and male competition, an old story...

    And of course dominant male dominated groups usually assimilated females, but killed or enslaved, without good chances for reproduction, the locals.
    Not to forget a possible highly stratified society with certain rules for sexual contact.

    Males were more selected at young age and in later fights and dangerous work. The male genes might be decisive for the son's survival too.

    Females mainly because of birth.

    In other words, European men may have been approximately
    as numerous as European women, but a fraction
    of men may have left many descendants at each generation,
    and another fraction may have left just a few or
    none.
    This would speak for a strong intraspecific and intragroup selection for European males in particular compared to other groups:

    polymorphisms; it may be that the demographic
    history of Europe has been peculiar or that the
    biallelic polymorphisms we considered offer insight into
    a different period.
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    Post Re: Y-chromosome mismatch distributions in Europe.

    Or maybe European males did remain constant but female variability was enhanced. Maybe the enhancement was the addition of Neanderthal genes.

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    Post Re: Y-chromosome mismatch distributions in Europe.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Solar Wolff
    Or maybe European males did remain constant but female variability was enhanced. Maybe the enhancement was the addition of Neanderthal genes.
    We have no Neandethal genes enough mtDNA studies show that!

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    Post Re: Y-chromosome mismatch distributions in Europe.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Solar Wolff
    Or maybe European males did remain constant but female variability was enhanced. Maybe the enhancement was the addition of Neanderthal genes.
    This is unlikely because the differences on the maternal line art not big enough for what is estimated to be, if there was such an admixture.
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