Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Ancient European Use of Cannabis

  1. #1
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    5,925
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    622
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    505
    Thanked in
    231 Posts

    Ancient European Use of Cannabis

    In ancient Germanic paganism, cannabis was associated with the Norse love goddess, Freya.[26][27] The harvesting of the plant was connected with an erotic high festival.[26] It was believed that Freya lived as a fertile force in the plant's feminine flowers and by ingesting them one became influenced by this divine force.[28] Linguistics offers further evidence of prehistoric use of cannabis by Germanic peoples: The word hemp derives from Old English hænep, from Proto-Germanic *hanapiz, from the same Scythian word that cannabis derives from.[29] The etymology of this word follows Grimm's Law by which Proto-Indo-European initial *k- becomes *h- in Germanic. The shift of *k→h indicates it was a loanword into the Germanic parent language at a time depth no later than the separation of Common Germanic from Proto-Indo-European, about 500 BC.

    sources http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religio...pean_Pagan_use

    ^ a b Pilcher, Tim (2005). Spliffs 3: The Last Word in Cannabis Culture?. Collins & Brown Publishers. p. 34. ISBN 9781843403104.
    ^ Vindheim, Jan Bojer. "The History of Hemp in Norway". The Journal of Industrial Hemp. International Hemp Association.

    Hemp fibre was most important to the Vikings as material for cordage

    The well respected archeologist, Anne Stine Ingstad, who was responsible for excavating the medieval Norse settlements in Newfoundland, is prominent among many historians who believe the younger of the two buried women -usually called the Oseberg Queen - was a priestess of the great Norse goddess Freya, and not only a secular queen as the first excavators thought. Ingstad sees the presence of the Cannabis seed in the (talismanic) pouch as an indication of possible ritual use of cannabis as an intoxicant in pre-christian Scandinavia.


    Worth noting in connection with the Oseberg find is the lack of ropes and textiles made from hemp. This is one reason for suggesting a ritual use for the Cannabis seeds. The women in the Oseberg ship had clothes made from flax, wool, silk and nettle, but not from hemp. The ropes were made from lime fibres in spite of the better quality of hemp rope.


    What do you think about this?

  2. #2
    Datter av Norge
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ælfrun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian-Canadian
    Gender
    Posts
    1,055
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts
    I think that smoking Cannabis has nothing to do with the use of hemp products
    All things must come to the soul from it's roots, from where it is planted. The that is beside the running water is fresher, and gives more fruit.

  3. #3
    Hundhedensk "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Håløyg
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    5,925
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    622
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    505
    Thanked in
    231 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ælfrun View Post
    I think that smoking Cannabis has nothing to do with the use of hemp products
    Yes, but check the last paragraph. I had never read about this until today. Ingstad is pretty well-known and respected

  4. #4
    Datter av Norge
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ælfrun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian-Canadian
    Gender
    Posts
    1,055
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    6 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Hersir View Post
    Yes, but check the last paragraph. I had never read about this until today. Ingstad is pretty well-known and respected
    indeed, but maybe they harvested cannabis seeds for crop. Hemp is really high in Omegas
    All things must come to the soul from it's roots, from where it is planted. The that is beside the running water is fresher, and gives more fruit.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last Online
    Thursday, April 5th, 2012 @ 12:41 AM
    Ethnicity
    Rugian
    Country
    Norway Norway
    Gender
    Family
    Widowed
    Politics
    Tradition
    Posts
    66
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    We have some textile and cordage made from hemp fiber in other iron age finds. Like a quite recent find due to glacial melting, where tools used for hunting were found. So-called "skremmepinner", sticks and rods put up to deflect reindeer movement in hunting. Scarecrows, so to speak. I'll se if I can dig up a decent source text.

    I'm not buying it as very credible that use of cannabis for intoxication would have been normal or common, even if it was the case that this was the intended use for the seeds in Oseberg (Is it even possible to get high from smoking or ingesting anything but a gargantuan amount of cannabis seed?).

    However the idea cannot at all be completely disproved, still there are no hints or indications of such use in any other context as far as I am aware. There are some however who attempt in the most imaginative of ways to prove the use cannabis as some sort of sacrament or trance-inducing tool among ecstatic ritual specialists, often incorporating odd folk-etymological approaches and healthy doses of peculiar sources(or rather, not citing any at all), not unlike those who try to debunk the Bible as some sort of shroomie ball-trip.

    As for me: I don't think it is at all impossible, but I will choose to assume it must have been marginal if at all, until better proof arises.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Fyrgenholt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Last Online
    Friday, February 24th, 2012 @ 12:27 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Isles
    Subrace
    Pred. Atlantid
    Country
    England England
    State
    Lancashire Lancashire
    Gender
    Posts
    502
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Well, we know for sure that our ancestors ingested mind altering substances (the most obvious of which being alcohol - "Alu" rune carvings on graves and "the mead of poetry" being particularly significant to the ritual usage of such, considering the significance of both alcohol and poetry to religious practice in particular, noting the etymology of, for one example, Odin's name) including cannabis, however cereals infected with ergot, seeds and other plants (even mistletoe and opium poppies) are indeed more common than this.

    Anyway, here are a few quotes of relevence, taken from "The Quest for the Shaman":

    "These two [The Tollund and Grauballe Men, bog-bodies, both from Jutland] belong to a large group of Iron Age bog bodies whose deaths may have been the result of ritual murder, but that they may have been special is suggested by their ingestion of food containing a curious, deliberately ensembled, mixture of cereal grains, chaff and wild seeds and, what is more significant, quantities of ergot were present in the gut.

    Ergot is a complex and toxic alkaloid substance contaminating cereals, particularly rye, consumption of which induces 'wild hallucinations, a burning sensation in the mouth and extremities ('St. Anthony's Fire'), acute abdominal pain and convulsions'. Indeed, the modern psychotropic drug, LSD, is an ergot-derivative. The fungus is unmistakable, giving rye grains a distinctive elongated and purplish appearance. There is no doubt that sufferers from ergotism would have behaved in a most perculiar manner, as if possessed, throwing themselves about and screaming with mental and physical anguish. Ergot contamination occurs naturally in damp, fermenting cereal and, despite its singular appearance, may sometimes have been ingested accidentally or under conditions of famine when there may have been little choice. However, it is conceivable that controlled quantities of ergot may have been deliberately consumed by individuals seeking to enter an altered, hallucinogenic mental state. An interesting feature of ergotism is its ability to cause collective delusions: thus one influential sufferer might control and share his or her mind-bending experience with others. It is highly possible that the men interred at Tollund and Nebelmose [named the Grauballe man] were shamans who consciously took ergot in order to transcend worlds and commune with the spirit-forces. Under extreme circumstances, they may have even connived at their own deaths: Mike Parker Pearson of the University of Sheffield, who has made a major contribution to the study of ancient death rituals, has suggested that the amount of ergot consumed by the Grauballe Man was sufficient to send him into a coma or kill him...

    ...Ergot was not the only strange substance ingested by Iron Age bog people, though it was probably the most dramatic. The archaeobotanist Gordan Hillman has pointed out that both the woman from Huldremose, found at Ramten in Djursland (Jutland) in 1879, and Lindow Man, discovered in a peat bog at Lindow Moss in Cheshire in 1984, had eaten a final meal containing infected barley. More interestingly, Lindow Man had consumed a minute quantity (four grains) of mistletoe pollen. This might be important, for mistletoe has a long pedigree as a remedy for a range of disorders including insomnia, cramps, vertigo, hypertension and some tumours. The type of mistletoe ingested at Lindow is Viscum album, precisey the Western European sub-species of the plant depicted as 'leaf crowns' on a discrete group of stone and metal anthropomorphic images from Iron Age Europe, including Pfalzfeld, Heidelberg, Glauberg and Schwarzenbach."

    "The presence of ergot in the intestines of the Tollund and Grauballe bog-men has already been mentioned and, it will be argued later, such drug-use may have influenced the so-called La Tène Iron Age tradition. Traces of cannabis and other hallucinogenic plants are occasionally discrenible in tomb-goods: cannabis was present in the grave of the 'noblemen' interred with great ceremony in Hochdorf, Germany, in the late sixth century BC. Half a millenium later, at the dawn of the Roman period (c.AD 50), a votive site at Frensham, Surrey, England, was the focus for the deposition of several miniature ceramic vessels, one at least of which certainly contained cannabis. Roughly synchronous with Frensham, is a man's grave at Stanway, near Colchester in Essex, furnished with elaborate equipment including a set of surgeon's tools, eight rods (four bronze, four iron) and a straining-bowl whose spout contained a plug of a plant material identified as a variety of artemisia, ingestion of which can induce a psychotropic effect. The combination of this substance, the medical kit and the set of rods is highly suggestive that the Stanway grave was that of a special person, ...

    ... The discovery of mind-altering substances in high-status burial (Stanway) and a religious site (Frensham) dating to the mid-first century AD accords with John Creighton's assertion that hallucinogenic plants may have been deliberately selected in Iron Age Britain. Creighton, a lecturer at Reading University, is a specialist on Iron Age coinage and, in his book 'Coins and Power in Late Iron Age Britain', he specifically mentions mandrake, henbane and opium, citing the quantities of henbane present in late Iron Age and Roman levels at Farmoor near Oxford, and of opium poppies mixed in with spelt wheat at Wallingford, Oxfordshire, in the earlier first millenium BC. The so-called 'cult-tree' from Manching in Bavaria, probably dating to the third century BC may provide circumstantial evidence for the use of mind-altering plants in ritual activity: it consists of a gilded wooden rod adorned with gilt-bronze leaves whose form closely resembles those of the convolvulus family, some of which produce seeds containing hallucinogenic toxins. "

    Aldhouse-Green, M. and Aldhouse Green, S. (2005). The Quest for the Shaman. London: Thames and Hudson, lmtd.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Rev. Jupiter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Last Online
    Friday, January 21st, 2011 @ 01:20 AM
    Ethnicity
    Celto-Germanic
    Ancestry
    Western
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Politics
    Radical Traditionalist
    Religion
    The Noble Path
    Posts
    310
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    One thing that people rarely consider when it comes to the history of traditional cannabis usage is the natural qualities of the different species.

    The species of cannabis that is native to Europe is one that isn't terribly potent. The only viable methods of consumption for the purpose of intoxication would be hashish (the production of which is incredibly time-consuming even with decent cannabis) and the burning of seeds, which would require a lot of wealth and social power to own the crops necessary to produce the amount of seeds required.
    However, the cannabis species native to central and southern Asia are much more potent, allowing for increased usage of foliage and hashish production that takes significantly less time.

    There are isolated cases of cannabis obviously prepared for intoxicating consumption, like hashish found in sites associate with the Hallstatt culture, but I doubt it was anything common simply due to the inefficiency of preparing European cannabis for consumption.

    In Indo-European traditions outside of continental Europe, though, it's pretty common knowledge that getting stoned was an integral element of the Vedic and ancient Zoroastrian religions.
    To practice magic is to be a quack; to know magic is to be a sage. - Eliphas Lévi

  8. #8
    Senior Member Fyrgenholt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Last Online
    Friday, February 24th, 2012 @ 12:27 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Isles
    Subrace
    Pred. Atlantid
    Country
    England England
    State
    Lancashire Lancashire
    Gender
    Posts
    502
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Rev. Jupiter View Post
    There are isolated cases of cannabis obviously prepared for intoxicating consumption, like hashish found in sites associate with the Hallstatt culture, but I doubt it was anything common simply due to the inefficiency of preparing European cannabis for consumption.
    Yes, such things would, I assume, not be found in the pockets of Mr. You-or-me but would instead be consumed by the ritualistic elite, priests, healers and so on and so forth in early society. The very nature of it being inefficient heightens it's significicance as a ritualistic product.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Rev. Jupiter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Last Online
    Friday, January 21st, 2011 @ 01:20 AM
    Ethnicity
    Celto-Germanic
    Ancestry
    Western
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Politics
    Radical Traditionalist
    Religion
    The Noble Path
    Posts
    310
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Fyrgenholt View Post
    Yes, such things would, I assume, not be found in the pockets of Mr. You-or-me but would instead be consumed by the ritualistic elite, priests, healers and so on and so forth in early society. The very nature of it being inefficient heightens it's significicance as a ritualistic product.

    Can't help but wonder if the significantly more widespread availability in the modern era isn't a blessing in disguise.

    Cannabis, when used responsibly, can induce states of metacognition that make for insightful analysis of our ancestral lore.
    We are living in what I consider to be the Wolf Age of the Ragnarok prophecy, and so it's all the better that things like cannabis are readily available for the truly spiritually attuned to put to visionary use so as to steel themselves to the dark and regressive forces of our age.
    To practice magic is to be a quack; to know magic is to be a sage. - Eliphas Lévi

  10. #10
    Eala Freia Fresena
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Ocko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Last Online
    Tuesday, February 5th, 2019 @ 03:10 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Friese
    Ancestry
    Friesland
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Montana Montana
    Location
    Glacier park
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    selfemployed
    Politics
    rightwing
    Religion
    none/pagan
    Posts
    2,923
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    17
    Thanked in
    16 Posts
    As modern dope is harvested from only female plants which have been protected from 'male seeds' so they don't became fertilized it might be indeed very much connected to a female Goddess.

    Also the state it produces is soft, peaceful and inactive. Depending on the dose one sees things more from a humerous side than a serious side.

    I don't know much about Freya then she was a shamaness and worked with fertility and the land in general.


    Drugs were commonly used in germanic lands. The purity of the beer was made a law, meaning beer should only be made with water, yeast and hopfen (hope?). That was a request from the catholic church, as their adherences often got stoned and drunk to the service and showed some erratic behaviour.

    The most famous, hallucigenic use in beer was the Bilsenkraut, hence Pilsner (the city Pilsen was named after that herb).

    I believe that it is the christianic faith which had trouble with states induced by herbs, mushrooms etc.

    It seems to be that the use of herbs were an integral part in medicinal as well as ritual happenings. There was no looking down on those states.

    It might also be that the knowledge of how to correctly use those herbs have been lost with the religious knowledge known by the Godes/Druids/heathen priests.

    I suggest an approach free of prejudgement.

    To get back to the knowledge one has to work with trial and error, like for example the philosopher Ernst Juenger, (a nationalist philosopher and pour-le-merite awarded soldiers of WWI)

    Our ancestors seemed to have seen same usefulness in drugs (beside the taking for recreational purposes in the later stages, as knowledge had been destroyed by overzealous priests)
    weel nich will dieken dej mot wieken

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The Ancient European Roots of Pennsylvania Dutch Barn Symbols
    By Nachtengel in forum Runes & Sinnbildkunde
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Thursday, November 16th, 2017, 02:12 PM
  2. European Elements in Ancient China
    By Northern Paladin in forum Anthropogeny & Ethnogenesis
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: Thursday, December 14th, 2006, 12:38 AM
  3. Motifs in the Arabian Nights and in Ancient and Medieval European literature
    By Frans_Jozef in forum Literature & Book Reviews
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Thursday, May 4th, 2006, 10:26 PM
  4. Ancient European Remains Found in Qinghai
    By The Blond Beast in forum Archaeology
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Thursday, July 8th, 2004, 11:24 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Saturday, May 15th, 2004, 09:15 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •