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Thread: A City Buried in Sand Was Found in Norway.

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    A City Buried in Sand Was Found in Norway.

    Neolithic analogue of the Italian city of Pompeii was found in southern Norway. Near Kristiansand archeologists have found a settlement, whose age is estimated to be 5,500 years old.


    Artifacts found allowed specialists to include the settlement to so-called Late Neolithic culture of Funnel-like Beakers that was common in northern Europe in the 4000-2700 BC. er.

    Excavation led by Lars Sundstrøm from the University of Oslo predicted that they would find the usual remnants of Neolithic settlements. However, the discovery turned out to be unique: the sand has played the same role of preserving, as volcanic ashes in Pompeii. Typically, settlements of the Stone Age are preserved very badly, but this city has reached our days in perfect condition thanks to the fact that it was buried under a meter of sand.

    On a cape formed by the river Topdalselv and the North Sea, the staff of the Museum of Cultural History at the University of Oslo has found some semblance of the ramparts – a 30-meters wall of sand mixed with clay and silt. Part of the structure is made of large stones, which probably were brought far from the city. Archaeologists have found many richly decorated parts of cupped vessels.

    Scientists believe that settlement itself was "seasonal." People were leaving utensils there intending to use it later. However, as a result of some accident settlement was destroyed. The researchers suggest that the settlement was flooded by waters of the nearby river.

    So far, archaeologists have unearthed about 500 square meters and the total area of the settlement amounted to be several thousand.

    Source http://www.tnp.no/2028-a-city-buried...ound-in-norway

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    Did they find any corpses? If so the remains, if well preserved, could yield some valuable DNA information.
    Lineage migration - Hatfield, Yorkshire, England ->Stainforth, Yorkshire, England ->Whitgift, Yorkshire, England->Blacktoft, Yorkshire, England->Mecklenburg County, Virginia ->Rutherford County, North Carolina ->Overton County, Tennessee.

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