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Thread: The Huguenot Tribe

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    Senior Member DerWeißeWehrwolf's Avatar
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    The Huguenot Tribe

    Many people have said there is no such germanic tribe. I understand it was also a religion at one point.

    But has anyone else heard of them?

    My father paid to have our last name researched & the earliest account was in what is now germany, but from the huguenot tribe.

    I have even learned a small bit about them in one of my college history courses.

    Does anyone have any other info?
    We must be educated in our books & family. We must train hard. We must shoot true & straight. We must carry on our name & heritage. We must protect our women. We will win.
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    Senior Member Hammer of Thor's Avatar
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    To be honest I have never heard of the term Huguenot refering to a Germanic tribe.

    I believe the term Huguenot refers to French Protestants (French Calvinist) during the 16th and 17th centuries. However, due to religious persecution many French Huguenots (roughly 40,000 out of 200,000 total) sought refuge in Germany and Scandinavia.

    It is logical to assume that many of the Huguenots living in Germanic countries eventually assimilated into the host populations.

    Hammer of Thor

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    Senior Member DerWeißeWehrwolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammer of Thor View Post
    To be honest I have never heard of the term Huguenot refering to a Germanic Tribe.

    I believe the term Huguenot refers to French Protestants during the 15th and 16th centuries. However, due to religious persecution many French Huguenots (roughly 40,000 out of 200,000 total) sought refuge in Germany and Scandinavia.

    Hammer of Thor
    From what our researcher tells us is that the Huguenots originated in Germany as a tribe, moved into northern france, set up shop there & spread out across france & into parts of spain too.
    We must be educated in our books & family. We must train hard. We must shoot true & straight. We must carry on our name & heritage. We must protect our women. We will win.
    ~Der Weiße Wehrwolf

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    Senior Member Hammer of Thor's Avatar
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    John Calvin, the man who started the Calvinist movement, was exiled to Straßburg, Germany. Calvin gained a large audience of Germans and his ideas began to spread rapidly. I believe Calvin eventually died in exile in Switzerland.

    Maybe this is what your researcher is refering to?

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    They could be considered a Germanic tribe if they were a Frankish sect. The term tribe harkens back to older times usually.

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    Senior Member Soten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuguenotWehrwolf View Post
    From what our researcher tells us is that the Huguenots originated in Germany as a tribe, moved into northern france, set up shop there & spread out across france & into parts of spain too.
    There was NEVER a Germanic tribe called the Huguenots. Huguenots were only ever the French Protestants from the 16th to 17th centuries. Your "researcher" is full of crap/insane/cheating you...take your pick.

    Some of your ancestors must have been French Huguenots. French being their ethnicity and Huguenot designating the fact that they were Protestants. They fled Catholic France for the safety of the American colonies.

    Etymology section from Wikipedia (you'll note that there is not a word about any Germanic tribes):

    Used originally as a term of derision, the derivation of the name Huguenot remains uncertain. Various theories have been promoted. The nickname may have been a French corruption of the German word Eidgenosse, meaning a Confederate, perhaps in combination with a reference to the religious leader and politician Besançon Hugues (died 1532). Geneva was John Calvin's adopted home and the center of the Calvinist movement. In Geneva, Hugues was the leader of the "Confederate Party," so called because it favoured an alliance between the city-state of Geneva and the Swiss Confederation. This theory of origin has support from the alleged fact that the label Huguenot was first applied in France to those conspirators (all of them aristocratic members of the Reformed Church) involved in the Amboise plot of 1560: a foiled attempt to transfer power in France from the influential House of Guise. The move would have had the side effect of fostering relations with the Swiss. Thus, Hugues plus Eidgenosse became Huguenot, a nickname associating the Protestant cause with some unpopular politics.[1]

    Like the first hypothesis, several others account for the name as being derived from German as well as French. O.I.A. Roche writes in his book The Days of the Upright, A History of the Huguenots that "Huguenot" is

    "a combination of a Flemish and a German word. In the Flemish corner of France, Bible students who gathered in each other's houses to study secretly were called Huis Genooten ('housemates') while on the Swiss and German borders they were termed Eid Genossen, or 'oath fellows,' that is, persons bound to each other by an oath. Gallicized into 'Huguenot', often used deprecatingly, the word became, during two and a half centuries of terror and triumph, a badge of enduring honor and courage."

    Some disagree with dual linguistic origins, arguing that for the word to have spread into common use in France, it must have originated in the French language. The "Hugues hypothesis" argues that the name can be accounted for by connection with Hugues Capet king of France,[2] who reigned long before the Reform times. He was regarded by the Gallicans and Protestants as a noble man who respected people's dignity and lives. Frank Puaux suggests, with similar connotations, a clever pun on the old French word for a covenanter (a signatory to a contract).[3] Janet Gray and other supporters of the theory suggest that the name huguenote would be roughly equivalent to little Hugos, or those who want Hugo.[2]

    In this last connection, the name could suggest the derogatory inference of superstitious worship; popular fancy held that Huguon, the gate of King Hugo, was haunted by the ghost of Le roi Huguet (regarded by Roman Catholics as an infamous scoundrel) and other spirits, who instead of being in purgatory came back to harm the living at night.[4] It was in this place in Tours that the prétendus réformés ("these supposedly 'reformed'") habitually gathered at night, both for political purposes, and for prayer and singing the psalms.[5] With similar scorn, some suggested the name was derived from les guenon de Hus (the monkeys or apes of Jan Hus).[6][7] While this and the many other theories offer their own measure of plausibility, attesting at least to the wit of later partisans and historians, if not of the French people at the time of this term's origin, "no one of the several theories advanced has afforded satisfaction."[8]

    Reguier de la Plancha (d. 1560) in De l'Estat de France offers the following explanation as to the origin:

    The origin of the name is curious; it is not from the German Eidegenossen as has been supposed. Reguier de la Plancha accounts for it as follows: — "The name huguenand was given to those of the religion during the affair of Amboyse, and they were to retail it ever since. I'll say a word about it to settle the doubts of those who have strayed in seeking its origin. The superstition of our ancestors, to within twenty or thirty years thereabouts, was such that in almost all the towns in the kingdom they had a notion that certain spirits underwent their Purgatory in this world after death, and that they went about the town during the night, striking and outraging many people whom they found in the streets. But the light of the Gospel has made them vanish, and teaches us that these spirits were street-strollers and ruffians. At Paris the spirit was called le moine bourré; at Orleans, le mulet odet; at Blois le loup garon; at Tours, le Roy Huguet; and so on in other places. Now, it happens that those whom they called Lutherans were at that time so narrowly watched during the day that they were forced to wait till night to assemble, for the purpose of praying to God, for preaching and receiving the Holy Sacrament; so that although they d'd frighten nor hurt anybody, the priests, through mockery, made them the successors of those spirits which roam the night; and thus that name being quite common in the mouth of the populace, to designate the evangelical huguenands in the country of Tourraine and Amboyse, it became in vogue after that enterprise."[9]

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    Senior Member DerWeißeWehrwolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oski View Post
    They could be considered a Germanic tribe if they were a Frankish sect. The term tribe harkens back to older times usually.
    Holy Sh!t, another californian is on here? what county are you in?
    We must be educated in our books & family. We must train hard. We must shoot true & straight. We must carry on our name & heritage. We must protect our women. We will win.
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    Senior Member Soten's Avatar
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    ^ I also find it funny that you're a Catholic, seeing as how the Huguenots were fleeing France to get away from Catholics.

    It's not unusual though. I just find it funny. The majority of my recentish ancestors would have been Protestant of one sect or another and I was also raised Catholic...only because of a couple Catholic great-grandmothers.

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    Senior Member DerWeißeWehrwolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soten View Post
    There was NEVER a Germanic tribe called the Huguenots. Huguenots were only ever the French Protestants from the 16th to 17th centuries. Your "researcher" is full of crap/insane/cheating you...take your pick.

    Some of your ancestors must have been French Huguenots. French being their ethnicity and Huguenot designating the fact that they were Protestants. They fled Catholic France for the safety of the American colonies.

    Etymology section from Wikipedia (you'll note that there is not a word about any Germanic tribes):
    Some of that info matches up, not all.

    Also, I merely asked a question, your attitude is not necessary. So in terms of your attitude, quit the sh!t.
    We must be educated in our books & family. We must train hard. We must shoot true & straight. We must carry on our name & heritage. We must protect our women. We will win.
    ~Der Weiße Wehrwolf

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    Senior Member Hammer of Thor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soten View Post
    There was NEVER a Germanic tribe called the Huguenots. Huguenots were only ever the French Protestants from the 16th to 17th centuries. Your "researcher" is full of crap/insane/cheating you...take your pick.

    Some of your ancestors must have been French Huguenots. French being their ethnicity and Huguenot designating the fact that they were Protestants. They fled Catholic France for the safety of the American colonies.
    That's what I was stating when I wrote:

    To be honest I have never heard of the term Huguenot refering to a Germanic tribe.

    I believe the term Huguenot refers to French Protestants (French Calvinist) during the 16th and 17th centuries. However, due to religious persecution many French Huguenots (roughly 40,000 out of 200,000 total) sought refuge in Germany and Scandinavia.


    However, his ancestors could have been Huguenots that integrated into German society after fleeing there. I'm sure that not all of the Huguenots in Germany went back to France. That or you are correct in stating that his "researcher" is lying.

    Hammer of Thor

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