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Thread: Why Norwegian is the Easiest Language for English Speakers to Learn

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    Why Norwegian is the Easiest Language for English Speakers to Learn

    "A week or so ago I wrote a fairly detailed post on why Persian / Farsi is actually much easier to learn than you think, in that it has a much simpler grammar than languages most people learn in school, and only the writing system gives the impression that it's somehow about as difficult as Arabic, which is more difficult for the average speaker than Persian by leaps and bounds.

    Persian is easy in terms of grammar, most Western European languages have the advantage of common vocabulary and recognition. Norwegian happens to have both of these, and in this post I'm going to show why Norwegian is the easiest language for your average English speaker to learn."

    Continues here http://www.pagef30.com/2008/08/why-n...guage-for.html

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    Aka GermanischerAdler Herefugol's Avatar
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    Absolutely. The continental North Germanic languages, perhaps aside from some of the pronunciation, are the easiest languages for an English speaker to learn. Although English is considered to be a West Germanic language, it is closer to the North Germanic in terms of syntax/grammar. This is partly a reflection of the Danelaw, where the transition between Old English and Middle English can be attributed in part to a simplification in grammar to aid communication between the Anglo-Saxons and the Danes. This can be seen in the modern languages:

    English: "I have never seen anything in the square."

    Danish: "Jeg har aldrig set noget på torvet."

    Contrasted to German: "Ich habe nie etwas auf dem Platz gesehen."

    Another aspect that makes the North Germanic languages easier to learn is the lack of conjugation of verbs. English has a small amount: "I speak, you speak, he speaks". German has a lot: "Ich spreche, du sprichst, er spricht". Swedish, on the other hand, has none: "Jag talar, du talar, han talar". Easy.

    Personally, I'd recommend Swedish as a first choice for learning a North Germanic language (no offense, Hersir ) because compared to Norwegian, it only has two grammatical genders instead of three, one standard orthography instead of Bokmål and Nynorsk, more learning material, and a larger population with which to converse/practise. I know it is shown that Norwegian is a middle ground between Swedish and Danish, but that generally only applies to native/highly fluent speakers.

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    Senior Member Thorwolf's Avatar
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    cool post, me and my oldest daughter are trying to learn Norwegian right now.
    we are in the early phases, counting, common phrases,how to order at a resturant, things like that. when we embarked on this journey, I was very suprised at how easy it realy was, Noting many similarities, between Norsk, and English. I am by no means there yet, but I am going to learn Norwegian.
    Michael Lingo

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    Good thread. Personally, I think all Germanic-language speakers would greatly benefit from learning another Germanic language. This would particularly apply to us as English speakers as not enough English-speaking people speak a second language, let alone a third or fourth. That this is so is because we are spoilt: so many non-English-speaking people learn English as a global language that only a comparative few native English speakers make an effort to learn another language.

    And for English speakers of Germanic heritage, learning another Germanic language would clearly have the most linguistic and cultural affinities, as well of course having the most ethnic affinities with the native speakers of whatever Germanic language is chosen to be learned. And North Germanic languages would be a good choice for the reasons already given above.

    Quote Originally Posted by GermanischerAdler
    Absolutely. The continental North Germanic languages, perhaps aside from some of the pronunciation, are the easiest languages for an English speaker to learn. Although English is considered to be a West Germanic language, it is closer to the North Germanic in terms of syntax/grammar. This is partly a reflection of the Danelaw, where the transition between Old English and Middle English can be attributed in part to a simplification in grammar to aid communication between the Anglo-Saxons and the Danes. This can be seen in the modern languages:

    English: "I have never seen anything in the square."

    Danish: "Jeg har aldrig set noget på torvet."

    Contrasted to German: "Ich habe nie etwas auf dem Platz gesehen."
    Interesting item of information, that.
    Between the devil and the deep blue sea.

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    I am in the process of learning Swedish, and find the written words familiarish but spoken they sound very foreign to my ear. For some reason i expected Swedish (and Norwegian dialects) to sound fairly similar to Afrikaans and a bit of Dutch and German. Still i agree that Teutonic languages are all worthy of study.

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    Thanks for this post, it is very interesting and I notice the similarities between Norwegian and English as well. Norwegian sounds so different when it is spoken instead of written though. That is what that confuses me sometimes Norwegian is such a beautiful language. I will learn it someday as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ælfrun View Post
    Norwegian sounds so different when it is spoken instead of written though.
    So duz Inglish. Tha spelling ov Inglish and Norweejan woz standardized long ago wen tha pronunseeayshon woz different.

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    Why Norwegian is the Easiest Language for English Speakers to Learn

    Great thread topic here.

    I learned to speak German pretty well when I was little (5 or so) just in speaking with my German grandmother. They say it is easier for young children to learn a language than for adults. Sadly I have forgotten most of it.

    However, I do hope to either start teaching myself or taking a class.

    I would also like to learn a Scandinavian language.

    This may be a stupid question, but can any of my Scandinavian brothers or sisters provide me with an answer her...

    If a person knows how to speak Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, or Icelandic, can that person understand the other Scandinavian languages? Is there one Scandinavian language that has more in common with the other three?

    Thanks in advance for sharing.
    Last edited by TXRog; Monday, June 20th, 2011 at 06:32 AM. Reason: spelling

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hersir View Post
    A week or so ago I wrote a fairly detailed post on why Persian / Farsi is actually much easier to learn than you think, in that it has a much simpler grammar than languages most people learn in school, and only the writing system gives the impression that it's somehow about as difficult as Arabic, which is more difficult for the average speaker than Persian by leaps and bounds.

    Persian is easy in terms of grammar, most Western European languages have the advantage of common vocabulary and recognition. Norwegian happens to have both of these, and in this post I'm going to show why Norwegian is the easiest language for your average English speaker to learn.

    Continues here http://www.pagef30.com/2008/08/why-n...guage-for.html

    I would LOVE to learn Norwegian. By far and away, my language aptitude tends to fall along the Germanic languages more than any other. I hated Spanish....but picked some up along the way because I used to work in food service and much of the support staff were Mexican....

    I DETEST French. Ugh. No. Thanks. The French hate Americans anyway for the very same reason....a non-French speaker will screw their language all up and make them hate us even more.....then they hate us for NOT trying to speak their language. Basically, the impression I've gotten is that the French are language-snobs....so they can HAVE it

    I find German very similar to English....and most of the words in German are actually spelled the way they sound. Another plus

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goomer View Post
    I would LOVE to learn Norwegian. By far and away, my language aptitude tends to fall along the Germanic languages more than any other. I hated Spanish....but picked some up along the way because I used to work in food service and much of the support staff were Mexican....

    I DETEST French. Ugh. No. Thanks. The French hate Americans anyway for the very same reason....a non-French speaker will screw their language all up and make them hate us even more.....then they hate us for NOT trying to speak their language. Basically, the impression I've gotten is that the French are language-snobs....so they can HAVE it

    I find German very similar to English....and most of the words in German are actually spelled the way they sound. Another plus


    I DETEST French also!
    All things must come to the soul from it's roots, from where it is planted. The that is beside the running water is fresher, and gives more fruit.

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