Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Farmers Slowed Down by Hunter-Gatherers: Our Ancestors' Fight for Space

  1. #1
    Germania incognita
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Skadi Funding Member
    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    34
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    6,155
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,268
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    966
    Thanked in
    459 Posts

    Farmers Slowed Down by Hunter-Gatherers: Our Ancestors' Fight for Space

    Agricultural – or Neolithic – economics replaced the Mesolithic social model of hunter-gathering in the Near East about 10,000 years ago. One of the most important socioeconomic changes in human history, this socioeconomic shift, known as the Neolithic transition, spread gradually across Europe until it slowed down when more northern latitudes were reached.

    Research published today, Friday, 3 December 2010, in New Journal of Physics, details a physical model, which can potentially explain how the spreading of Neolithic farmers was slowed down by the population density of hunter-gatherers.

    The researchers from Girona, in Catalonia, Spain, use a reaction-diffusion model, which explains the relation between population growth and available space, taking into account the directional space dependency of the established Mesolithic population density.

    The findings confirm archeological data, which shows that the slowdown in the spreading of farming communities was not, as often assumed, the result of crops needing to adapt to chillier climates, but indeed a consequence of the struggle for space with prevalent hunter-gatherer communities.

    In the future, the researchers' model could be used for further physical modeling of socioeconomic transitions in the history of humanity. As the researchers write, "The model presented in this work could be applied to many examples of invasion fronts in which the indigenous population and the invasive one compete for space in a single biological niche, both in natural habitats and in microbiological assays."

    More information: The researchers' paper can be downloaded for free here

    Source http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-12-...ors-space.html

    "Make strong old dreams lest our world lose heart." -Ezra Pound



    Support Skadi forum



  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Hrogar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 @ 11:29 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Dutch
    Ancestry
    Germany, Netherlands
    Subrace
    Germanic
    Country
    Netherlands Netherlands
    State
    Limburg (NL) Limburg (NL)
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Occupation
    Knowledge management consultant
    Politics
    The Northern Path
    Religion
    Asatru
    Posts
    162
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    The article speaks of invasive population of farmers. But it seems to me that the idea of lots of farmers getting organized and invading a territory of hunter-gatherers seems a bit strange.
    I would think that it was the farming methods and technologies that were performing the invasion. If a neighboring group of people had a more stable source of food due to farming, then you would probably also start farming. Along trade and communication routes, ideas can travel fast.

    Honor and defend the northern people,
    Honor and defend the northern lands,
    Walk the Northern Path,
    Sigr!

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Wynterwade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Monday, February 6th, 2012 @ 08:41 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    England, Germany
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Country
    Vinland Vinland
    Gender
    Posts
    491
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    15
    Thanked in
    15 Posts
    If a neighboring group of people had a more stable source of food due to farming, then you would probably also start farming. Along trade and communication routes, ideas can travel fast.
    I would bet that it isn't an education difference but a genetic difference. Usually hunter gatherers have a harder time learning the meaning of saving- read the book "10,000 year explosion"- much of the book is about this very topic. These are mental differences, and overtime huge genetic differences occur naturally leading to conflict for land. Different ways of life bred different types of people.

    Also look at North America, we are a perfect example of the effects of hunter gatherers (native americans) coming into contact with farmers (europeans).

    10,000 years ago (the time given in the article) is a VERY long time ago- hard for us to conceptualize- so read that book- "10,000 year explosion".

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: Friday, June 17th, 2016, 01:41 AM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Saturday, December 18th, 2010, 02:47 PM
  3. Replies: 16
    Last Post: Monday, May 31st, 2010, 04:18 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Thursday, January 6th, 2005, 11:07 PM
  5. Genetics, Archaeology, and Holocene Hunter-Gatherers
    By Euclides in forum Population Genetics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sunday, June 13th, 2004, 06:09 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •