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Thread: Wage Slavery

  1. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by genius View Post
    Hamar Fox I bestow upon you the title of genius.

    Anyway this brings up a good point. Most of the people who own these businesses are trying to find ways to squeeze out more personal profits by creating redundant and useless products. Then they advertise to convince people they need them. I suppose a more "socialist" system would be set up differently. Mainly if people were more socially minded they could plan out towns, cities etc. in a more productive way.

    My point is: wage slavery does exist but its volunatary slavery. So its not really slavery. There are plenty of ways out of it in our current society. Social oppression mainly occurs against those who work hard, are competent etc. rather than the under classes.
    There is no such thing as voluntary slavery in that nobody volunteers on their own to be ensalved or exploited like one in which it is the other way around from where a person is coerced into being one.

    There are plenty of ways out of it in our current society. Social oppression mainly occurs against those who work hard, are competent etc. rather than the under classes.
    Oh, so now the haves are socially oppressed compared to the have nots? That just doesn't make any sense.
    National Socialism is the only salvation for Germanics and Europids everywhere. Capitalism, libertarianism, and communism is the enemy.

    National socialized collectivism must prevail over radical individualism.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaricLachlan View Post
    There is no such thing as voluntary slavery
    There is and it stems from our tendency to fulfill our wants with the least amount of effort. There is freedom in this "voluntary slavery" in the sense the employee need not struggle for work like a self employed man does, instead the work is brought right to him and placed in his lap. In a planned economy the government provides the work and the servitude eventually shifts from voluntary to forced as the government is not some third entity, big brother but the all and to take from the all to give to the all what they are already capable of defies reason.

  3. #113
    Senior Member Paradigm's Avatar
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    Did anyone ever define "wage slavery" to begin with?
    "If the natural tendencies of mankind are so bad that it is not safe to permit people to be free, how is it that the tendencies of these organizers are always good? Do not the legislators and their appointed agents also belong to the human race? Or do they believe that they themselves are made of a finer clay than the rest of mankind?" - Frédéric Bastiat, The Law

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaricLachlan View Post
    There is no such thing as voluntary slavery in that nobody volunteers on their own to be ensalved or exploited like one in which it is the other way around from where a person is coerced into being one.
    Okay maybe I can make it clear this way: I have met people who cry about how they don't want to drink and how it ruins their lives. Then 15 minutes later are drinking again. Same with people who use drugs or beat their wives or whatever. Some people are just defective. It is their own defective nature which enslaves them, not other human beings.

    Some people can be "saved" from this defectiveness by changing their ideas, others are just genetically inclined to always be defective no matter what. Arguing with them is like arguing with an ox. An ox is utterly useless other than to pull a plow. For him pulling a plow is actually a gift that society gives him. Though he may look at the humans who are doing better than him with envy he can never be human himself because he wasn't born human.

    In the same way people want all the advantages of being smart, of being socially responsible etc. but aren't smart themselves, can't be socially responsible etc. Most poor people are not reliable, treat their own friends and family like crap. they can't function in a civilized group.

    I have seen the government give people in the ghetto expensive homes, more expensive than most people live in. A few years later the home is totally destroyed and the people outside are crying "why is our home run down while other people live better than us" umm its run down because you wont mow the grass or clean up after yourself and you busted out all the windows.

  5. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vindefense View Post
    There is and it stems from our tendency to fulfill our wants with the least amount of effort. There is freedom in this "voluntary slavery" in the sense the employee need not struggle for work like a self employed man does, instead the work is brought right to him and placed in his lap. In a planned economy the government provides the work and the servitude eventually shifts from voluntary to forced as the government is not some third entity, big brother but the all and to take from the all to give to the all what they are already capable of defies reason.
    Some choose their slavery whereas others do not.

    It's naive to say that in this world people are not forced into all sorts of things at all or forced to become somthing that which they don't wish for freely.

    It's also naive to say that others don't survive by stripping away the indendepence of others.

    You seem to think freedom is amongst everywhere in this world that is all for the taking where there is no disruption in between.

    I disagree.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paradigm View Post
    Did anyone ever define "wage slavery" to begin with?
    People forced into low income occupations against their will in which they are forced to sell their labor for a minimum income doing menial jobs because they have no other choice when it concerns their survival.

    How do you like that definition?

    Quote Originally Posted by genius View Post
    Okay maybe I can make it clear this way: I have met people who cry about how they don't want to drink and how it ruins their lives. Then 15 minutes later are drinking again. Same with people who use drugs or beat their wives or whatever. Some people are just defective. It is their own defective nature which enslaves them, not other human beings.

    Some people can be "saved" from this defectiveness by changing their ideas, others are just genetically inclined to always be defective no matter what. Arguing with them is like arguing with an ox. An ox is utterly useless other than to pull a plow. For him pulling a plow is actually a gift that society gives him. Though he may look at the humans who are doing better than him with envy he can never be human himself because he wasn't born human.

    In the same way people want all the advantages of being smart, of being socially responsible etc. but aren't smart themselves, can't be socially responsible etc. Most poor people are not reliable, treat their own friends and family like crap. they can't function in a civilized group.

    I have seen the government give people in the ghetto expensive homes, more expensive than most people live in. A few years later the home is totally destroyed and the people outside are crying "why is our home run down while other people live better than us" umm its run down because you wont mow the grass or clean up after yourself and you busted out all the windows.
    Your generalizing again.

    Why do articulate that most poor people are scum socially?

    A great deal of poor people are unlucky and unfortunate not being how you define them at all. I'm sure that is the general consensus conferred to them by the upper classes as a means of their oppression.
    National Socialism is the only salvation for Germanics and Europids everywhere. Capitalism, libertarianism, and communism is the enemy.

    National socialized collectivism must prevail over radical individualism.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaricLachlan View Post
    Some choose their slavery whereas others do not.
    It is the same relationship a dog has to an owner when the dog stays with the master because the master provides for him. To me this is wage slavery, which is a volunteered condition here since you reserve the right at any time to spit out the masters food and find food yourself. Whether you can do this or not is test of character nothing more.

    It's naive to say that in this world people are not forced into all sorts of things at all or forced to become somthing that which they don't wish for freely.
    The key to life is to do what you love to do and have the talent to do, then everything follows. Those who find their work to be wage slavery obviously are not following this rule. Also before anyone accuses me of selfish individualism, what I describe above is not self pursuit for self gain, no it is the utilization of your natural potential in the benefit of the group. See, I am a collectivist.



    You seem to think freedom is amongst everywhere in this world that is all for the taking where there is no disruption in between.
    Nope. I think all life is bound by duty and debt and nothing exists that is entirely free, not even breathing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaricLachlan View Post
    People forced into low income occupations against their will in which they are forced to sell their labor for a minimum income doing menial jobs because they have no other choice when it concerns their survival.

    How do you like that definition?
    Define "forced" and "against their will".

    They are not working for nothing, they obviously have something they want or need, and to make that gain they have to work for it. It's not if you have 12 year old children working in coal mines, you have people my age and older working to pay off things they have in regular jobs. Everyone's born with the same faculties, if they waste them don't expect anyone to replace them.

    When it comes to the life of the individual and the countless choices, no one forces them into the job they hold, and no one forces them to buy the things they do, and if they have no other choice it must be a very sad hypothetical example.
    "If the natural tendencies of mankind are so bad that it is not safe to permit people to be free, how is it that the tendencies of these organizers are always good? Do not the legislators and their appointed agents also belong to the human race? Or do they believe that they themselves are made of a finer clay than the rest of mankind?" - Frédéric Bastiat, The Law

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vindefense View Post
    It is the same relationship a dog has to an owner when the dog stays with the master because the master provides for him. To me this is wage slavery, which is a volunteered condition here since you reserve the right at any time to spit out the masters food and find food yourself. Whether you can do this or not is test of character nothing more.



    The key to life is to do what you love to do and have the talent to do, then everything follows. Those who find their work to be wage slavery obviously are not following this rule. Also before anyone accuses me of selfish individualism, what I describe above is not self pursuit for self gain, no it is the utilization of your natural potential in the benefit of the group. See, I am a collectivist.





    Nope. I think all life is bound by duty and debt and nothing exists that is entirely free, not even breathing.

    It is the same relationship a dog has to an owner when the dog stays with the master because the master provides for him. To me this is wage slavery, which is a volunteered condition here since you reserve the right at any time to spit out the masters food and find food yourself. Whether you can do this or not is test of character nothing more.
    It's interesting that you would use a dog and a master as a analogy considering that in ancient history cur was a proper terminology for slave which roughly translates into dog as it was a used insultingly.

    At any rate the dog has no choice but to stay with the master because it's been domesticated all it's life to know no other existence especially when it concerns surviving on it's own where should it turn on the master it is usually euthanized immediately.

    Of course one could argue that the slave cannot find no other course to exist especially in procuring food for themselves when considering how the master controls the food supply.

    Moreover the slave could rebel and try to create their own existence elsewhere but if the master controls all of the territory of the world divided amongst other masters the slave couldn't go anywhere without being confronted by somebody wishing to impose their complete utter subjugation on them.

    Just out of curiosity using the dog analogy, are we to say that low minimum workers are somebody elses pet?

    To me this is wage slavery, which is a volunteered condition here since you reserve the right at any time to spit out the masters food and find food yourself. Whether you can do this or not is test of character nothing more.
    A slave could but then when confronted by the many police officers, soldiers, and prisons of the masters they might reflect upon themselves not to.

    You still haven't explained how any of this voluntary.


    The key to life is to do what you love to do and have the talent to do, then everything follows.
    I'm sure that's the ideal but the reality of it all is much different.

    Nietzsche said it best that life revolves around power.

    The key to life is to acquire power so that one can do what they love to do where everything follows of course the general consequence of that is that when people have no power of their own they can do none of the above.

    [Which is why I made this thread to reflect upon all of that.]


    Those who find their work to be wage slavery obviously are not following this rule.
    Explain.


    Also before anyone accuses me of selfish individualism, what I describe above is not self pursuit for self gain, no it is the utilization of your natural potential in the benefit of the group. See, I am a collectivist.
    Sure........I guess I can understand that but the extremes of collectivism can also be tyranny of the majority against the minority in which the minority becomes enslaved.

    I support collectivism too however I only support it to certain level as long as it does not exceed the existence of individuals themselves for a key element to collective functioning is the happiness of individuals. I don't like the extreme of one over the other.

    Nope. I think all life is bound by duty and debt and nothing exists that is entirely free, not even breathing.
    So then your position is of the radical collectivist in which uniformity is key where the behavior of humans are negated to mere uniformed drone like behavior of ants where the individuals are sacrificed for the superorganism of society.

    Can't say I really support that position because I don't.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paradigm View Post
    Define "forced" and "against their will".

    They are not working for nothing, they obviously have something they want or need, and to make that gain they have to work for it. It's not if you have 12 year old children working in coal mines, you have people my age and older working to pay off things they have in regular jobs. Everyone's born with the same faculties, if they waste them don't expect anyone to replace them.

    When it comes to the life of the individual and the countless choices, no one forces them into the job they hold, and no one forces them to buy the things they do, and if they have no other choice it must be a very sad hypothetical example.

    Define "forced" and "against their will".
    Restricted, limited, and coerced into a position within a society that is of little benefit to themselves against their will usually by that of those who are in positions of control when it concerns resources or positions within a given society.


    They are not working for nothing, they obviously have something they want or need, and to make that gain they have to work for it.
    They are working for a minimum in order to get the lowest basic essentials out of civilized living because they are limited or restricted based upon their skills and lack of when it concerns those with power that actually control the resources along with key governing portions of any given society.

    It's not if you have 12 year old children working in coal mines, you have people my age and older working to pay off things they have in regular jobs.
    What you have instead is people pushing spatulas their entire lives or working in a assembly production line doing one menial task after another for the lowest possible income in order to subsist in living while they serve the wealthy [master] opulent class.

    Everyone's born with the same faculties, if they waste them don't expect anyone to replace them.
    This is where your incorrect and this of course is the most blatant lie going on in our societies today thus being perpetuated.


    When it comes to the life of the individual and the countless choices, no one forces them into the job they hold, and no one forces them to buy the things they do, and if they have no other choice it must be a very sad hypothetical example.
    So what your saying is that we live in a bright world of sunshine and lolli pops where freedom is there for everybody in this nice little utopia we call earth where oppression and coercion of any kind does not exist at all where everything can be solved by happy talk........
    is this what your saying?

    We all know the popular expression nowadays that goes on in saying that freedom isn't free. Why the expression?

    It's because freedom is bought and purchased for a price thus reducing freedom as a ridiculous useless concept altogether in discourse.
    National Socialism is the only salvation for Germanics and Europids everywhere. Capitalism, libertarianism, and communism is the enemy.

    National socialized collectivism must prevail over radical individualism.

  9. #119
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    Wage Slavery

    Use this thread to talk about wage slavery. Do you think that wage slavery is a trait of the current corporate/capitalist system? What jobs does it typically include? I'm pretty sure many of us have read those articles about Amazon and Facebook employees and the horrors of wage slavery. The typical wage slave as portrayed by the media is either a warehouse worker or some other blue collar/manual type of job, or a call center worker. What about other white collared jobs, which are paid less than they used to be? For example, a computer programmer who is only paid a little over minimum wage, or whose salary barely covers the rent and food expenses?

    Are you a wage slave, do you feel like one? Have you ever been one? How do you avoid it/how do you go to work avoiding feeling like one? If you were a wage slave, describe the working conditions. Would you/did you do it as a temporary or long term thing? What to do to combat wage slavery, and so forth.

    A few articles:

    Wage slavery is a term used to draw an analogy between slavery and wage labor by focusing on similarities between owning and renting a person. It is usually used to refer to a situation where a person's livelihood depends on wages or a salary, especially when the dependence is total and immediate.

    The term "wage slavery" has been used to criticize exploitation of labour and social stratification, with the former seen primarily as unequal bargaining power between labor and capital (particularly when workers are paid comparatively low wages, e.g. in sweatshops) and the latter as a lack of workers' self-management, fulfilling job choices and leisure in an economy. The criticism of social stratification covers a wider range of employment choices bound by the pressures of a hierarchical society to perform otherwise unfulfilling work that deprives humans of their "species character" not only under threat of starvation or poverty, but also of social stigma and status diminution.

    Similarities between wage labor and slavery were noted as early as Cicero in Ancient Rome, such as in De Officiis. With the advent of the Industrial Revolution, thinkers such as Pierre-Joseph Proudhon and Karl Marx elaborated the comparison between wage labor and slavery, while Luddites emphasized the dehumanization brought about by machines. Before the American Civil War, Southern defenders of African American slavery invoked the concept of wage slavery to favorably compare the condition of their slaves to workers in the North. The United States abolished slavery after the Civil War, but labor union activists found the metaphor useful and appropriate. According to Lawrence Glickman, in the Gilded Age "[r]eferences abounded in the labor press, and it is hard to find a speech by a labor leader without the phrase".[15]
    The introduction of wage labor in 18th-century Britain was met with resistance, giving rise to the principles of syndicalism. Historically, some labor organizations and individual social activists have espoused workers' self-management or worker cooperatives as possible alternatives to wage labor.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wage_slavery

    I Was a Warehouse Wage Slave

    My brief, backbreaking, rage-inducing, low-paying, dildo-packing time inside the online-shipping machine.

    “Don’t take anything that happens to you there personally,” the woman at the local chamber of commerce says when I tell her that tomorrow I start working at “Amalgamated Product Giant Shipping Worldwide Inc.” She winks at me. I stare at her for a second.

    “What?” I ask. “Why, is somebody going to be mean to me or something?”

    She smiles. “Oh, yeah.” This town somewhere west of the Mississippi is not big; everyone knows someone or is someone who’s worked for Amalgamated. “But look at it from their perspective. They need you to work as fast as possible to push out as much as they can as fast as they can. So they’re gonna give you goals, and then you know what? If you make those goals, they’re gonna increase the goals. But they’ll be yelling at you all the time. It’s like the military. They have to break you down so they can turn you into what they want you to be. So they’re going to tell you, ‘You’re not good enough, you’re not good enough, you’re not good enough,’ to make you work harder. Don’t say, ‘This is the best I can do.’ Say, ‘I’ll try,’ even if you know you can’t do it. Because if you say, ‘This is the best I can do,’ they’ll let you go. They hire and fire constantly, every day. You’ll see people dropping all around you. But don’t take it personally and break down or start crying when they yell at you.”

    Several months prior, I’d reported on an Ohio warehouse where workers shipped products for online retailers under conditions that were surprisingly demoralizing and dehumanizing, even to someone who’s spent a lot of time working in warehouses, which I have. And then my editors sat me down. “We want you to go work for Amalgamated Product Giant Shipping Worldwide Inc.,” they said. I’d have to give my real name and job history when I applied, and I couldn’t lie if asked for any specifics. (I wasn’t.) But I’d smudge identifying details of people and the company itself. Anyway, to do otherwise might give people the impression that these conditions apply only to one warehouse or one company. Which they don’t.

    So I fretted about whether I’d have to abort the application process, like if someone asked me why I wanted the job. But no one did. And though I was kind of excited to trot out my warehouse experience, mainly all I needed to get hired was to confirm 20 or 30 times that I had not been to prison.

    The application process took place at a staffing office in a run-down city, the kind where there are boarded-up businesses and broken windows downtown and billboards advertising things like “Foreclosure Fridays!” at a local law firm. Six or seven other people apply for jobs along with me. We answer questions at computers grouped in several stations. Have I ever been to prison? the system asks. No? Well, but have I ever been to prison for assault? Burglary? A felony? A misdemeanor? Raping someone? Murdering anybody? Am I sure? There’s no point in lying, the computer warns me, because criminal-background checks are run on employees. Additionally, I have to confirm at the next computer station that I can read, by taking a multiple-choice test in which I’m given pictures of several album covers, including Michael Jackson’s Thriller, and asked what the name of the Michael Jackson album is. At yet another set of computers I’m asked about my work history and character. How do I feel about dangerous activities? Would I say I’m not really into them? Or really into them?

    In the center of the room, a video plays loudly and continuously on a big screen. Even more than you are hurting the company, a voice-over intones as animated people do things like accidentally oversleep, you are hurting yourself when you are late because you will be penalized on a point system, and when you get too many points, you’re fired—unless you’re late at any point during your first week, in which case you are instantly fired. Also because when you’re late or sick you miss the opportunity to maximize your overtime pay. And working more than eight hours is mandatory. Stretching is also mandatory, since you will either be standing still at a conveyor line for most of your minimum 10-hour shift or walking on concrete or metal stairs. And be careful, because you could seriously hurt yourself. And watch out, because some of your coworkers will be the kind of monsters who will file false workers’ comp claims. If you know of someone doing this and you tell on him and he gets convicted, you will be rewarded with $500.

    The computers screening us for suitability to pack boxes or paste labels belong to a temporary-staffing agency. The stuff we order from big online retailers lives in large warehouses, owned and operated either by the retailers themselves or by third-party logistics contractors, a.k.a. 3PLs. These companies often fulfill orders for more than one retailer out of a single warehouse. America’s largest 3PL, Exel, has 86 million square feet of warehouse in North America; it’s a subsidiary of Deutsche Post DHL, which is cute because Deutsche Post is the German post office, which was privatized in the 1990s and bought DHL in 2002, becoming one of the world’s biggest corporate employers. The $31 billion “value-added warehousing and distribution” sector of 3PLs is just a fraction of what large 3PLs’ parent companies pull in. UPS’s logistics division, for example, pulls in more than a half a billion, but it feeds billions of dollars of business to UPS Inc.

    “Leave your pride and your personal life at the door,” the lady at the chamber of commerce says, if I want to last as an online warehouse worker.
    Anyhow, regardless of whether the retailer itself or a 3PL contractor houses and processes the stuff you buy, the actual stuff is often handled by people working for yet another company—a temporary-staffing agency. The agency to which I apply is hiring 4,000 drones for this single Amalgamated warehouse between October and December. Four thousand. Before leaving the staffing office, I’m one of them.

    I’m assigned a schedule of Sunday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. When additional overtime is necessary, which it will be soon (Christmas!), I should expect to leave at 7 or 7:30 p.m. instead. Eight days after applying, i.e., after my drug test has cleared, I walk through a small, desolate town nearly an hour outside the city where I was hired. This is where the warehouse is, way out here, a long commute for many of my coworkers. I wander off the main road and into the chamber of commerce to kill some afternoon time—though not too much since my first day starts at 5 a.m.—but I end up getting useful job advice.

    “Well, what if I do start crying?” I ask the woman who warns me to keep it together no matter how awfully I’m treated. “Are they really going to fire me for that?”

    “Yes,” she says. “There’s 16 other people who want your job. Why would they keep a person who gets emotional, especially in this economy?”

    Still, she advises, regardless of how much they push me, don’t work so hard that I injure myself. I’m young. I have a long life ahead of me. It’s not worth it to do permanent physical damage, she says, which, considering that I got hired at elevensomething dollars an hour, is a bit of an understatement.

    As the sun gets lower in the curt November sky, I thank the woman for her help. When I start toward the door, she repeats her “No. 1 rule of survival” one more time.

    “Leave your pride and your personal life at the door.” If there’s any way I’m going to last, she says, tomorrow I have to start pretending like I don’t have either.

    Though it’s inconvenient for most employees, the rural location of the Amalgamated Product Giant Shipping Worldwide Inc. warehouse isn’t an accident. The town is bisected by a primary interstate, close to a busy airport, serviced by several major highways. There’s a lot of rail out here. The town became a station stop on the way to more important places a hundred years ago, and it now feeds part of the massive transit networks used to get consumers anywhere goods from everywhere. Every now and then, a long line of railcars rolls past my hotel and gives my room a good shake. I don’t ever get a good look at them, because it’s dark outside when I go to work, and dark again when I get back.

    We are surrounded by signs that state our productivity goals. Other signs proclaim that a good customer experience, to which our goal-meeting is essential, is the key to growth, and growth is the key to lower prices, which leads to a better customer experience. There is no room for inefficiencies.
    Inside Amalgamated, an employee’s first day is training day. Though we’re not paid to be here until 6, we have been informed that we need to arrive at 5. If we don’t show up in time to stand around while they sort out who we are and where they’ve put our ID badges, we could miss the beginning of training, which would mean termination. “I was up half the night because I was so afraid I was going to be late,” a woman in her 60s tells me. I was, too. A minute’s tardiness after the first week earns us 0.5 penalty points, an hour’s tardiness is worth 1 point, and an absence 1.5; 6 is the number that equals “release.” But during the first week even a minute’s tardiness gets us fired. When we get lined up so we can be counted a third or fourth time, the woman conducting the roll call recognizes the last name of a young trainee. “Does your dad work here? Or uncle?” she asks. “Grandpa,” he says, as another supervisor snaps at the same time, sounding not mean but very stressed out, “We gotta get goin’ here.”

    The culture is intense, an Amalgamated higher-up acknowledges at the beginning of our training. He’s speaking to us from a video, one of several videos—about company policies, sexual harassment, etc.—that we watch while we try to keep our eyes open. We don’t want to be so intense, the higher-up says. But our customers demand it. We are surrounded by signs that state our productivity goals. Other signs proclaim that a good customer experience, to which our goal-meeting is essential, is the key to growth, and growth is the key to lower prices, which leads to a better customer experience. There is no room for inefficiencies. The gal conducting our training reminds us again that we cannot miss any days our first week. There are NO exceptions to this policy. She says to take Brian, for example, who’s here with us in training today. Brian already went through this training, but then during his first week his lady had a baby, so he missed a day and he had to be fired. Having to start the application process over could cost a brand-new dad like Brian a couple of weeks’ worth of work and pay. Okay? Everybody turn around and look at Brian. Welcome back, Brian. Don’t end up like Brian.

    Soon, we move on to practical training. Like all workplaces with automated and heavy machinery, this one contains plenty of ways to get hurt, and they are enumerated. There are transition points in the warehouse floor where the footing is uneven, and people trip and sprain ankles. Give forklifts that are raised up several stories to access products a wide berth: “If a pallet falls on you, you won’t be working with us anymore.” Watch your fingers around the conveyor belts that run waist-high throughout the entire facility. People lose fingers. Or parts of fingers. And about once a year, they tell us, someone in an Amalgamated warehouse gets caught by the hair, and when a conveyor belt catches you by the hair, it doesn’t just take your hair with it. It rips out a piece of scalp as well.

    If the primary message of one-half of our practical training is Be Careful, the takeaway of the other half is Move As Fast As Humanly Possible. Or superhumanly possible. I have been hired as a picker, which means my job is to find, scan, place in a plastic tote, and send away via conveyor whatever item within the multiple stories of this several-hundred-thousand-square-foot warehouse my scanner tells me to. We are broken into groups and taught how to read the scanner to find the object among some practice shelves. Then we immediately move on to practicing doing it faster, racing each other to fill the orders our scanners dictate, then racing each other to put all the items back.

    “Hurry up,” a trainer encourages me when he sees me pulling ahead of the others, “and you can put the other items back!” I roll my eyes that my reward for doing a good job is that I get to do more work, but he’s got my number: I am exactly the kind of freak this sort of motivation appeals to. I win, and set myself on my prize of the bonus errand.

    That afternoon, we are turned loose in the warehouse, scanners in hand. And that’s when I realize that for whatever relative youth and regular exercise and overachievement complexes I have brought to this job, I will never be able to keep up with the goals I’ve been given.

    The place is immense. Cold, cavernous. Silent, despite thousands of people quietly doing their picking, or standing along the conveyors quietly packing or box-taping, nothing noisy but the occasional whir of a passing forklift. My scanner tells me in what exact section—there are nine merchandise sections, so sprawling that there’s a map attached to my ID badge—of vast shelving systems the item I’m supposed to find resides. It also tells me how many seconds it thinks I should take to get there. Dallas sector, section yellow, row H34, bin 22, level D: wearable blanket. Battery-operated flour sifter. Twenty seconds. I count how many steps it takes me to speed-walk to my destination: 20. At 5-foot-9, I’ve got a decently long stride, and I only cover the 20 steps and locate the exact shelving unit in the allotted time if I don’t hesitate for one second or get lost or take a drink of water before heading in the right direction as fast as I can walk or even occasionally jog. Olive-oil mister. Male libido enhancement pills. Rifle strap. Who the fuck buys their paper towels off the internet? Fairy calendar. Neoprene lunch bag. Often as not, I miss my time target.
    https://www.motherjones.com/politics...ehouses-labor/

    Lessons Learned as a Corporate Wage Slave

    I spent years of my life slaving away in the corporate world for less than $40k per year.

    Here are a few highlights:
    • With a fresh college degree, I stacked cement tiles in a cold warehouse and lived in my parents’ basement.
    • I was fired for a data entry job after a crazy cat lady co-worker tattled on me for ‘sleeping on the job’ because I didn’t pretend to care enough about pictures of her cats.
    • As a temp call center worker, I was hired and fired seasonally with phone demand, always eagerly coming back when asked.
    • I gratefully accepted a pay cut when I was only making about $31k a year to avoid being laid off. They laid me off anyway a few months later.
    • After being shot at in a drive-by shooting one night and getting zero sleep, I still got up the next morning and tried to go to work.
    • When I discovered a flat tire with a bullet in it, I called and apologized for not being able to come in, fearing for my job. I was given a written attendance warning.
    • I was once ‘written up’ for ‘taking two breaks’ when I made a cup of tea, set it on my desk, then went to the bathroom. I was expected to bring my tea into the bathroom with me. I apologized for what I had done.
    • I once stayed at work until 10pm doing nothing, but not being “allowed” to leave until everyone was finished. I got home around 11, ate a few handfuls of potato chips standing up at the kitchen counter, went to sleep, and woke up at 5:30AM to do it all again.
    • I spent years driving over an hour each way on the worst highway in the state to do a job I hated.
    • I’ve been told more times than I can count “Just be grateful you have a job!”
    • I once walked into a dark office bathroom, thinking it was empty, and just before I hit the light switch, I heard shit noises from the stall. These people were so subservient, they were SHITTING IN THE DARK rather than looking for a light switch.
    • I have never once quit a job in my life, no matter how terrible. I’m that fucking stubborn.
    • On my last day in corporate hell, when the layoffs were announced, I watched old fat women cry and shake with fear. I could barely contain my excitement and happiness.
    • I decided that day to never do a job like that again.
    • I never did.
    • Now maybe I just had a bad experience. Maybe my results were not typical.
    • I know there are clearly people who have had some degree of ‘success’ in the corporate world. Some of them probably even like it.
    • But not me.
    • After that last layoff, I spent several months working on it. I read a lot of books. I joined a (now defunct) Quora writing challenge, where all the members committed to write at least one answer on Quora every day.
    • I started a blog. Nobody read it. I took online courses and learned new things.
    • Then I got a job. Not a corporate shit job, but a good one at a small financial and entrepreneurial newsletter company.
    • I finally broke that $40k salary mark (BIG TIME!)
    • Most importantly, I finally escaped the world of weekly Wednesday emails with a picture of a camel screaming “HUMP DAY” and fucking khaki pants.
    • I worked with people who actually did things, not just ass-kissers looking to avoid the boss’ attention.
    • I was in charge of things, I was expected to handle them, and I did. Going to work was no longer the worst thing in my life. And I could (and did) work from anywhere.
    • In short, I went from a human hamster in a wheel, to an actual human.


    That job is over now, and I’m at a bit of a turning point…

    The corporate world is still there, with all its “security” and predictability. But shopping for khaki pants sounds about as appealing to me as eating broken glass.

    So I’m using my severance to live while I try to start something on my own. I may come across another good job like I had, but I’m not even considering the traditional corporate world.

    No guarantees, but considering the alternatives, I’m going to try to make this stuff work.

    The biggest lesson I learned from the corporate world is that it takes a certain kind of person to succeed there, and as much as I tried to force it, I’m not that kind of person.

    Are you?
    https://medium.com/@MarkToole/lesson...e-6729d6850092

    Escape Wage Slavery And Become Who You Were Meant To Be

    How to best live life is the only question that matters. Ironically, most of us think we know the answer when we’re young. As we age however, the reality of life’s circumstances has a way of forcing us to compromise. Work and family demands drain our energy and enthusiasm and leave little time left over to contemplate the question how best to live life, let alone answer it. Gradually, the momentum of our daily routine becomes us and our jobs become our lives.

    We’re thankful to have a job but just cant help that constant nagging sense of dullness. The monotony of our daily routine leaves us unfulfilled.

    When we are tapped in a cycle of trading time for money to support our existence, this is, in effect, wage slavery. If your are disturbed by the use of the word slavery, you ought to be. It is a disturbing revelation to learn that we are not truly free. It certainly was for me.

    Most people unknowingly fall into this category. For a long time I did and I was miserable.

    But there are those among us, an elite group of high achievers that
    manage to balance life’s demands with meaningful work and fulfilling lives. They’re not just sucesfull in their fields, they’re living well, impacting people positively and moving humanity forward. And it looks like they’re having a great time while doing it. The secret behind their happiness is no secret at all, they are reaching their full human potential.

    5 years ago I made a decision to take control of my life and career by studying and emulating the behaviors of this group of high achievers. In the following series of posts I will detail the thought process, habits and tools I used to transform my life and career from a mid level employee at a dead end job who existed in a bubble of mediocrity, to doubling my income as an entrepreneur and writer, while moving abroad and living the life I used to day dream about. It is my hope that by demystifying the process of self actualization it will make it easier for some of you to do the same.

    The Drive Towards Meaning
    The ancient Greek work arête, meant to realize ones full human potential. The ancient Greeks (and Romans) believed that true joy (not to be confused with pleasure) came from realizing ones potential. Pleasures, they (correctly) observed, are short lived and fleeting but the joy derived from the self worth one gets from living a life full of meaning is an endless bounty from an eternal well.

    More than 2000 years ago the Stoic philosopher Seneca wrote;

    “Joy is an elation of spirit, of a spirit which trust its goodness and truth of its own possessions. Real joy never ceases and never turns into its opposite.”
    We mourn stars who die tragically young. But what of those of who die old, full of regret at having wasted what little time they had? Far more of us fall victim to this kind of fate. In her book “The Top Five Regrets of The Dying” palliative nurse Bronnie Ware recorded the most common regrets of her dying patients, unsurprisingly number the number one regret was

    “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.”

    As Ware herself explains it:

    “This was the most common regret of all. When people realize that their life is almost over and look back clearly on it, it is easy to see how many dreams have gone unfulfilled. Most people had not honored even a half of their dreams and had to die knowing that it was due to choices they had made, or not made.
    It stands to reason then that the most common tragedy is not dying young, but dying unfulfilled, having lived a life devoid of meaning.

    We are all biologically hardwired to want to feel useful and necessary. But discovering this utility (meaning) can be a scary and difficult thing.

    The most obvious place to discover and exercise our utility is in our jobs. Our work is much more than just what we do for money. Whether we admit it to ourselves or not, our jobs are where we will spend the majority of our waking hours. If we seek to be happy and truly free then we cannot be indifferent towards this sizeable chunk of our lives. Work we deem to be purposeful gives us the sense of meaning we so desperately crave. Our goal then should not be liberation from work but liberation
    through work. Getting paid to do meaningful work is the first stop on the journey to self actualization. And like any
    journey we must plan logistically if we hope to arrive at our
    destination in one piece.

    Charting A Course
    It is a fact that we are all adrift on a sea of uncertainty. This can be a terrifying realization or a liberating epiphany. Yet it remains a central tenant of human existence. The future is uncertain and most of us are not yet where we want to be, but it is our job to shepherd the ship of our life to safe harbor.

    In any seaward journey there are two (controllable) factors determining the outcome of the trip, the captain and the ship. We are the captain and the ship is the resources (time, money, skills, knowledge and credibility) we have at our disposal right now. Not at some obscure point in the future but right now. We all wish we had a more seaworthy ship and in the coming steps (and posts) we will learn how to build it. But first we must learn to sail and in doing so we will come to understand the demands that our ship needs to meet and thus be able to tailor it specifically for our journey.

    Learning to Sail
    One would not set sail on a transoceanic passage without first testing their skills on a shorter trip. Similarly, it would not be wise to leave our jobs before first getting paid to do the gig we hope to make our full time job. Whatever that thing is, whether it is writing, coding, designing, marketing etc. start small and think in executable steps.

    We are incredibly fortunate to live in an interconnected world with a global job market. For the first time in human history anyone, living anywhere can hire someone to do work for them, free of geographical (and other) limitations. Take advantage of this and create a profile on a site (like Upwork) where you can find freelance work and start applying for small gigs you can do on the side. The point here is to establish credibility and build a client list that will lead to referrals in the future.

    This rubber meets road reality test will also let you know if you have what
    it takes to start working and earning a living in the field of your
    choosing. If your skills are not yet up to par or in high enough demand that is okay. At least you know where you stand and what needs to be done to get where you want to be.

    In order for any of this happen you must first dedicate the time to bring it to fruition. Lack of time (or perception there of) is the most common obstacle that prevents people people from even starting on the path to self actualization.

    Despite being an all to common objection, few of us actually lack the free time to work for our dreams. Sure, we have demands outside of work that occupy our time but how much of our free time do we spend frivolously? How much of our it is consumed by infotainment sites, watching Netflix, surfing Facebook and the plethora of other instant gratification distractions that plaque modern existence?

    Getting things done is as simple as scheduling our time. 2 hours of focused work, 5 days a week is 10 hours of work a week and 40 hours a month. By simply dedicating two hours a day, every work day, we have just added an additional week of work for every month. Now extrapolate forward and imagine how much further along the path we will be in a year, 2 years and 5. Exciting isn’t it?

    Suddenly there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Our future possibilities invigorate us and gives meaning to the daily grind. However mundane, we have the satisfaction of knowing that each day we are one step further along our path.

    This only works however if this time is free of distractions and full of focused work. This means no checking emails, internet surfing, texting or phone calls during this period. For this reason it is best to schedule these two hours early in the morning or at the end of the day. These are the periods in which we are least disturbed. I prefer the morning because I feel sharpest. In the evenings I tend to have some cognitive fatigue from the work day and can feel the quality of my writing decline. Other people prefer the evenings as they feel most creative and alive when the sun goes down. Whichever you prefer is fine as long as you show up, free of distractions and do your work.

    Building Your Ship
    Now that we know what our journey requires it is time to take concrete actions to make sure we meet those demands. We should start by giving ourselves a realistic time line for leaving our (current) jobs. To do this we first need to figure out how much money we need to save to cover the disparity of our expenses and our income as a freelancer for one year. (Since we are not working full-time yet, go ahead and multiply current monthly income as a freelancer by 3, since we will be able to take on 30 more hours of work a week once we leave our jobs.) If our salary as a (full time) freelancer isn’t enough to cover our current expenses we need to do one (or all) of the following.

    a) curb our expenses to bring this number into balance

    b) raise our rate as a freelancer

    c) save enough money to cover the difference for a period of one year

    By calculating how much time we need to save enough money to cover the imbalance between our expenses and our income as a freelancer for a period of one year, we’ve given ourselves a timeline. Once we’ve selected a firm date, the hard part starts, following through with our plans.

    If properly planned reaching a destination has little to do with the ship and much to do with the mental fortitude of the captain. If the captain panics in stormy weather or rough seas the journey is almost certainly doomed. The discipline of captaining then is the art of adapting to circumstance. The mind of the captain must be both clear and sharp if they are to adapt with fluidity. The only state of mind from which this adaptation can successfully be performed is peace of mind. Peace of mind is not only central to reaching our goals, it is our goal. Without it all of our endeavors will fall short. In his book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance Robert M. Pirsig wrote

    “Peace of mind isn’t at all superficial, really, it’s the
    whole thing. That which produces it is good maintenance; that which
    disturbs it is poor maintenance. What we call workability of the machine
    is just an objectification of this peace of mind. The ultimate test’s
    always your own serenity. If you don’t have this when you start and
    maintain it while you’re working you’re likely to build your personal
    problems right into the machine itself.”
    Later in the book Pirsig praises his favorite piece of technical writing for taking this into account.

    “My favorite piece of technical writing: Assembly of Japanese bicycle require great peace of mind.”
    Unfortunately modern office work makes us really bad at acquiring and maintaining this peace of mind. Skills like communication prioritization, time management and deep focus are antithetical to the fast paced, shallow work environments in which most of us exist. Perhaps most distressing is how years of working in these environments has conditioned our minds to respond to “stressful” stimulus.

    Most of us have low levels of patience, persistence and objectivity. Put simply (and perhaps crudely) we lack the mental fortitude to shepherd our ship to safe harbor.

    Before setting sail then the mind of the captain must be sharpened for the perilous journey ahead. In my next post we will examine the systems of thoughts (both ancient and modern), routines, behaviors and perceptive selection that we can use to tame the mind and find the peace we need and crave.
    https://thriveglobal.com/stories/dit...very-for-ever/

    Some others:
    Peeing in trash cans, constant surveillance, and asthma attacks on the job: Amazon workers tell us their warehouse horror stories
    How do you go to work without feeling like a wage slave?
    Facebook moderators break their NDAs to expose desperate working conditions

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    A comfortably retired man I used to shoot with at a conservation club was always criticizing those who were struggling financially just to survive day-to-day. I finally got tired of hearing his scathing opinions and confronted him about it.

    This is what I told him, more-or-less:

    Discounting those who choose to live irresponsibly by ruining any possibility of achieving a comfortable and financially secure future by dropping out of school, breeding out of wedlock, abusing drugs (including alcohol), getting a criminal record, gambling, or just flat-out being lazy, many of those who choose to live responsibly these days can no longer expect to be able to actually own a decent home, pay-off an average new car, start a family, or save for their retirement, because the economic climate has changed dramatically since the sixties.

    Unchecked corporate greed, and senseless consumerism is contributing to the demoralizing problem of "wage slavery".

    This is an excellent article concerning the depressing economic plight of working people:

    "Economic slavery, or wage slavery, refers to one’s total and immediate dependence on wages to survive. Although people throughout history have had to work to get by, we now live in a culture where we are led to believe we have economic freedom, when unbeknownst to most citizens, we are in fact bound in servitude. We automatically accept a 40-hour workweek with meager hourly pay as normal, even though many work overtime and still struggle to survive. There are also those who make enough to live comfortably but are unable to request less hours—you either work 40 hours a week, or you don’t get to work at all. We submit when told what to wear, when we have to arrive and depart, when we’re allowed to eat, and even when we’re allowed to use the restroom. How is it we have come to allow this?

    The 40-hour-work week came about during the Industrial Revolution in Britain when at one point workers were putting in 10 to 16 hour days and began to protest. Working situations for Americans began to worsen as well, and by 1836, labor movement publications were also calling for a 40-hour workweek. Citizens in both situations were so overworked, an eight-hour day was easily accepted. This system is unnecessary now, if it ever was, but we still accept it due to the effects of our capitalist society.


    There are many contributing factors that have led to our current economic system and continued acceptance of the 40-hour workweek, three major factors being consumerism, inflation, and debt. First, it’s important to understand exactly what inflation is, how it works, and how it leads to debt."

    https://anonhq.com/40-hour-week/

    Aside from an ever increasing number of mortals who have willfully chosen to worship Satan and his minions, our battle has always been against the powers and principalities operating surreptitiously throughout this twisted world.

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