Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: First Americans 'Reached Europe Five Centuries Before Columbus Voyages'

  1. #1
    Senior Member Guntwachar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Last Online
    Monday, January 31st, 2011 @ 10:40 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Dutch
    Ancestry
    Netherlands, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, England, Scotland & Normandy
    Country
    Netherlands Netherlands
    State
    South Holland South Holland
    Gender
    Age
    30
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Occupation
    Musician
    Politics
    Free-Thinker & Anti-Monarchist
    Religion
    Heiden
    Posts
    681
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    First Americans 'Reached Europe Five Centuries Before Columbus Voyages'

    First Americans 'reached Europe five centuries before Columbus voyages'

    The first Americans reached Europe five centuries before Christopher Columbus "discovered" the New World, according to claims made by a Spanish university team.

    Scientists tracing the genetic origins of an Icelandic family believe the first American arrived in Europe around the 10th century, a full five hundred years before Columbus set off on his first voyage of discovery in 1492.

    Norse sagas suggest the Vikings discovered the Americas centuries before Columbus and the latest data seems to support the hypothesis that they may have brought American Indians back with them to northern Europe.

    Research indicates that a woman from the North American continent probably arrived in Iceland some time around 1000AD leaving behind genes that are reflected in about 80 Icelanders today.

    Investigators discovered the genes could be traced to common ancestors in the south of Iceland, near the Vatnaj Kull glacier in around 1710 ruling out initial theories that they may have arrived via Asia.

    "As the island was practically isolated from the 10th century onwards, the most probable hypothesis is that these genes correspond to an Amerindian woman who was taken from America by the Vikings some time around the year 1000," Carles Lalueza-Fox, of the Pompeu Fabra university in Spain, said.

    A Viking settlement at L'Anse aux Meadows, in the eastern Canadian region of Terranova, is thought to date to the 11th century.

    Researchers said they would keep trying to determine when the Amerindian genes first arrived in Iceland and would seek to link them to burial remains in the Americas.

    The genetic research, made public by Spain's Centre for Scientific Research, was due to be published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.
    Telegraph

  2. #2
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Æmeric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Britain, Ulster, Germany, America
    Subrace
    Dalofaelid+Baltid/Borreby
    Y-DNA
    R-Z19
    mtDNA
    U5a2c
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Indiana Indiana
    Gender
    Age
    57
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    Anti-Obama
    Religion
    Conservative Protestantism
    Posts
    6,269
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    570
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    518
    Thanked in
    226 Posts
    Because Iceland was isolated from the rest of the world from the 11th century onwards scientists speculate that the woman must have been taken from the Americas sometime around the year 1000.
    Iceland was not completely cut off from the rest of the world. Fishing was a major industry in medieval Iceland as it is now & the fish was exported to the rest of Europe. Columbus visited Iceland years before sailing to the New World. Isolated would imply Iceland was cut off from all other societies, such as Hawaii & New Zealand before the latter 18th century.

    The DNA lineage, named C1e, is mitochondrial – which means that the genes were introduced by a woman.

    The unknown American woman was probably abducted from the Americas and then brought to Iceland after surviving the sea voyage back. She then bore children in her new home but nothing was ever written of her existence or fate.

    The study will be published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

    Iceland is a renowned centre for gene research and the new study was led by DeCode Genetics - a world-leading genome research lab on the island which has DNA records of almost everyone living on the island.

    Carles Lalueza-Fox, who co-authored the paper, told MailOnline: ‘In my view, the most plausible hypothesis is that these four Icelandic families derived from an Amerindian woman brought there at pre-Columbian times.

    ‘There are alternatives to this that we cannot totally reject. To have a definite proof, we should found a pre-Columbian Icelandic remain that could be genetically analysed and show the same Amerindian lineage.’

    One of the alternatives is that a post 1400s American female, like Pocohontas, the character that inspired the Disney film, found her way from mainland Europe to Iceland. But scientists believe this to be unlikely because of how isolated Iceland was at the time.
    According to the Kensington Stone a group of Norwegian & Swedish explorers were in the Red River Valley of Minnesota in 1362. It is likely that they got there via Iceland.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Hilderinc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Last Online
    Saturday, August 25th, 2012 @ 02:05 AM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    England, Germany, Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Illinois Illinois
    Location
    Not Chicago
    Gender
    Posts
    983
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Æmeric View Post
    According to the Kensington Stone a group of Norwegian & Swedish explorers were in the Red River Valley of Minnesota in 1362. It is likely that they got there via Iceland.
    The Kensington runestone has caused much controversy, there are many reputable people who say it is real, but there are just as many who say it is fake.

    Other 'controversial' Norse artifacts in inland North America are the Beardmore Relics and the Heavener Runestone.

    The Norse may have also explored south of Newfoundland, as suggested by the so called Maine penny.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last Online
    Thursday, April 5th, 2012 @ 12:41 AM
    Ethnicity
    Rugian
    Country
    Norway Norway
    Gender
    Family
    Widowed
    Politics
    Tradition
    Posts
    66
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    "Reputable" is not exactly the word I would use in favor of the supporters of the authenticity of the stone. They resemble in most aspects the kind of runes found in Swedish Dalarna in early modern times, and there simply isn't any logical reason as to why somebody would bother carve such an elaborate text into a stone where nobody were to read it even if anything else about it made any sense.

    The people who talk in favor of the authenticity are largely Americans of Scandinavian heritage without any proper knowledge about runology or old norse philology.

  5. #5
    Progressive Collectivist
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Agrippa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Last Online
    Monday, January 31st, 2011 @ 09:22 PM
    Ethnicity
    German
    Subrace
    Atlantid
    Location
    Asgard
    Gender
    Politics
    Progressive Collectivist
    Religion
    Catholic
    Posts
    6,968
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    11
    Thanked in
    11 Posts
    The case is not closed, like I wrote in another forum:


    Well, we can't be sure yet, as almost always in such matters of the interpretation of genetic results:

    Our results indicate a latest possible arrival date in Iceland of just prior to 1700 and a likely arrival date centuries earlier. Most surprisingly, we demonstrate that the Icelandic C1 lineage does not belong to any of the four known Native American (C1b, C1c, and C1d) or Asian (C1a) subclades of haplogroup C1. Rather, it is presently the only known member of a new subclade, C1e. While a Native American origin seems most likely for C1e, an Asian or European origin cannot be ruled out.
    http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2010/11...celanders.html

    So probably we deal with some sort of archaic hunter-gatherer groups as well - even if that is less likely, it might be still possible.

    Also, the Inuits/Eskimids and some Indianid groups replaced and eliminated some earlier strata, especially for the Eskimos that is a clear thing, they erradicated an older group adapted to the habitat they now inhabitat.

    So another option would be, since that doesn't date so long back, that the Vikings brought a more "Palae-Indian", "Palae-Eskimo" woman with them, which original population is now shrunken to almost nothing or even eliminated, so that it couldn't be proven in Eskimos so far.

    I'm especially thinking about people like the Sadlermiut:

    They are sometimes thought to have been the last remnants of the Dorset culture
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadlermiut

    The Paleo-Eskimo were the peoples who inhabited the Arctic region from Chukotka (e.g. Chertov Ovrag) in present-day Russia[1] across North America to Greenland prior to the rise of the modern Inuit and/or Eskimo and related cultures. The first known Paleo-Eskimo cultures developed by 2500 BCE, but were gradually displaced in most of the region, with the last one, the Dorset culture, disappearing around 1500 CE.

    Paleo-Eskimo groups included the Pre-Dorset; the Saqqaq culture of Greenland (2500 - 800 BCE); the Independence I and Independence II cultures of northeastern Canada and Greenland (c. 2400 – 1800 BCE and c. 800 – 1 BCE); the Groswater of Labrador and Nunavik, and the Dorset culture (500 BCE to 1500 CE), which spread across Arctic North America. The Dorset were the last major Paleo-Eskimo culture in the Arctic before the migration east from present-day Alaska of the Thule, the ancestors of the modern Inuit.
    In February 2010, scientists reported they had performed the first genome sequencing of an ancient human. Using fragments of hair 4,000 years old, the National Museum of Denmark, Beijing Genomics Institute, and additional collaborating scientific institutions sequenced nearly 80% of a Paleo-Eskimo man's genome. The man was found in Greenland and believed to be from the prehistoric Saqqaq culture.

    Based on the genome, the scientists believe there was a distinct, separate migration of peoples from Siberia to North America some 5,500 years ago. They noted that this was independent of earlier migrations whose descendants comprised the historic cultures of Native Americans and Inuit. By 4,500 years ago, descendants of that later migration had reached Greenland. The remains used for analysis were found in a Saqqaq culture area.[3]

    The scientists reported that the man, dubbed "Inuk", had A+ blood type, genes suggesting he was adapted to cold weather, had brown eyes, brownish skin, dark hair, and would likely bald later in life. This marked the first sequencing of an ancient human's genome and the first sequencing of an ancient human's mitochondrial genome
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleo-Eskimo

    It is always "funny", or better naive, stupid and/or hypocritical, if people talk about other people than Europeans in a way as if they never would have moved, led wars, genocides and replaced other people.

    The more powerful and progressive people - culturally and/or racially - always took the land they wanted or just needed, that's one of the major reasons for war and women were often part of the booty, but not always. Sometimes they were killed too.

    Would be really interesting to know the EXACT path of this mtDNA in Northern Europe.

    In that case, so is my conclusion, this might be another option for the origin of this mtDNA-variant.
    Magna Europa est patria nostra
    STOP GATS! STOP LIBERALISM!

Similar Threads

  1. Maize and Turkeys in Europe Before Columbus
    By Catterick in forum Alternative Sciences
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Friday, March 10th, 2017, 07:38 PM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: Saturday, July 16th, 2011, 02:21 AM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: Friday, September 17th, 2010, 03:16 AM
  4. Does Skull prove that the first Americans came from Europe?
    By Veratýr in forum Anthropogeny & Ethnogenesis
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sunday, September 9th, 2007, 04:48 PM
  5. What Happened in Europe in the 14th and 15th Centuries
    By Johannes de León in forum Middle Ages
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Thursday, July 8th, 2004, 10:31 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •