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Thread: Führer Show: A Visit to Germany's First-Ever Hitler Exhibition

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    Führer Show: A Visit to Germany's First-Ever Hitler Exhibition

    On Friday, the German History Museum is opening postwar Germany's first-ever comprehensive exhibition on Adolf Hitler. Curators went out of their way to avoid creating an homage -- yet they are still concerned about attracting cheering neo-Nazis and angry protesters.

    The portrait is rather pretentious -- oil on canvas, and a whopping156 by 120 centimeters (5 feet 1 inch by 3 feet 11 inches). It shows Adolf Hitler the way his Nazis and favorite artists most liked to see him -- posing as the visionary ruler against a backdrop of an imagined German landscape.

    "We likely could have had it," says Hans-Ulrich Thamer. The US Army, which has held the painting since 1939, would certainly have been open to loaning out the painting. But Thamer, a curator for the German Historical Museum (DHM), didn't want it. The rationale, it appears, was that German eyes shouldn't be dazzled a second time by this sort of monumental state-sponsored art from the Third Reich. Thamer prefers, instead, to display smaller reproductions of the Führer. "That detracts from his impact," the curator says.

    An extensive exhibition about the dictator opens this Friday at the German History Museum in Berlin, the first in Germany's post-war history to focus exclusively on Hitler's life. The exhibition is not without risks: Organizers fear that the show could be showered with unwanted praise from right-wing extremists -- and with bitter protest from the rest of the country. Indeed, out of a lack of trust in those who will visit the exhibition, the show will omit anything that might glorify Hitler as a hero. "We cannot provide any opportunity to identify with him," has been the watchword for Thamer, who developed the show.

    To be sure, there have been countless exhibitions in Germany addressing the Third Reich, covering topics including the Holocaust, crimes committed by the German military, the Nazi justice system, medicine in the Third Reich, forced labor, concentration camps and other horrors. Until now, though, museum directors and politicians responsible for cultural affairs have shied away from dealing directly with the man who presided over those horrors.
    More: http://www.spiegel.de/international/...722612,00.html

    Some pictures:

    Overview.



    A paper lantern from 1940.



    The images that greet visitors upon entering the exhibition.



    A book cover out of a private collection.



    The exhibition includes various examples of Hitler memorabilia, but they tend to be placed in smaller display cases and are not a central focus of the show.



    A deck of cards from 1934.



    A container for the collection of money for a German charity.



    Boxes that could be used to save money for a Volkswagen, from around 1940.


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    Hitler Exhibition In Berlin

    Berlin museum breaks Nazi taboo with Hitler exhibition

    The first big exhibition in Germany to focus on Adolf Hitler and his relationship with the German people is opening in Berlin.

    It is the first time relics of the Nazi era have ever been displayed as a museum piece in the country.

    Fears that such an exhibition might attract neo-Nazi sympathisers have put off museums until now.

    Museum director Hans Ottomeyer explains why he thought the time was right to produce the display.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-11547359

  3. #3

    Hitler Exhibition

    "Hitler was a poor tramp and it needed the acclaim of the Germans to make Hitler what he became. This the exhibition tries to reflect. It is about propaganda and it is about the means of his attraction."

    I wonder what kind of gratuitous falsehoods are being displayed for the whole of the German people by these nuts.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-11542473
    Hitler's relationship with Germany explored
    By Stephen Evans BBC News, Berlin




    Posters of different 'German races' and a Nazi era warning poster on inter racial breeding The new exhibition in Berlin has Adolf Hitler as its focus for the first time

    The title is important: Hitler and the German People. The first ever big exhibition in a major German museum to focus on Hitler is not just about him but about his relationship with the people.

    And that, of course, makes for discomfort. After all, the people who come to the German Historical Museum in Berlin are the grandchildren and, occasionally, the children of those who participated in the poisonous relationship in the 1930s and early 40s. This is not an exhibition where the visitors view coolly from outside. It is one where they look into themselves, too.

    “I find the exhibition of Hitler not a good idea. I believe the neo-Nazis will come” -Hans Coppi, whose parents were hanged by the Nazis

    What they will find as they walk the rooms is that Hitler and the Nazis permeated ordinary German life. There are tiny toys depicting him, children's models of him in uniform with his arm outstretched in salute.

    There is a quilt where the inhabitants of a village have depicted their homes in delicate needle-craft - alongside the Nazi symbols also stitched with great care. There is a cup and saucer with a swastika, and a lamp shade with the same symbol. There is a deck of playing cards showing Hitler and other Nazis. There is a gravestone from 1938 with a swastika.


    Museum director Hans Ottomeyer on why the exhibition was put together

    There are also exhibits that give the game away, as it were. There is a very ordinary amateur painting, but on the back you see the Torah, the implication being that the sacred Jewish text was just taken and used for material for a hobby. Who now knows where it came from or what became of the original owners?

    As you look, you wonder.

    One of the few bits of personal memorabilia is a vast wooden desk with an eagle and snake on the front, and used by Hitler. The conclusion the organisers want you to draw is about his obsession with aggrandisement. It is a desk that is useless except for what it says.

    There are paintings of the masses as just that: the masses - regimented, indistinguishable one from the next. There is a painting from before the war which depicts the masses hauling their leader - depicted as a monstrous giant - in adoration. The organisers said they want the viewer to conclude: don't say nobody knew it was coming because here it is foretold.
    Swastikas on display The depiction of the swastika remains illegal in public places

    The exhibition is ground-breaking because it breaks a great taboo in Germany - and remember that the depiction of the swastika or the Nazi salute remain illegal in public places (the museum is exempt because it's technically for research purposes). But previous attempts at exhibitions focusing on Hitler came to naught because of the fear of attracting neo-Nazis.

    Six years ago, for example, a similar exhibition entitled Hitler and the National Socialist Regime was rejected because it was felt to be too personalised - too focused on the man.

    It's the images of Hitler that remain the problem, and in this current exhibition they are sparse. There are the busts of him, which were turned out industrially for mantelpieces throughout the land. And there are pictures of him in rows on the front covers of today's news magazines, perhaps to make the point that Hitler sells.

    But there isn't personal memorabilia. The clothes he wore are not here. The German museum has not, for example, borrowed one of his uniforms from a museum in Moscow.

    Simone Erpel, the curator of the exhibition, said: "Something worn by Hitler, even if it was just twice, could become a fetish."

    There's no doubt it is all very thoughtfully done, but people remain uneasy. On the one hand, there are people who say that Hitler is not studied enough in schools so the more serious contemplation and sheer information there is, the better.
    Busts of Adolf Hitler Busts of Hitler were turned out industrially for mantlepieces

    But there are also those who see dangers. Also in the week when the exhibition opens, three small brass plaques on cobble stones were laid in a quiet street a short distance from the museum.

    On them were the names of three people executed by the Nazis for organizing resistance and saving Jews. One of the people at the street ceremony was Hans Coppi whose parents were hanged.

    "I find the exhibition of Hitler not a good idea. I believe the neo-Nazis will come," he said.

    To which the director of the Museum on Unter den Linden, Hans Ottomeyer replies: "We are not haunted by neo-Nazis because we are a place of enlightenment. They don't read books and they don't go to exhibitions".

    "Hitler was a poor tramp and it needed the acclaim of the Germans to make Hitler what he became. This the exhibition tries to reflect. It is about propaganda and it is about the means of his attraction."

    So does the holding of the exhibition mean that Hitler is now in the past, a person for museums but remote from today's reality?

    "He is not past and remote. He is still everywhere to be feared," says Mr Ottomeyer.

    "Our cities and our public buildings are still destroyed and not rebuilt - and the same is true of the minds and the values of the people which were heavily hampered by the Third Reich and its effects."
    Let us not forget what the current leader of Germany remarked about Islamic and foreign influence in Deutschland

    “Our country is going to carry on changing, and integration is also a task for the society taking up the immigrants,” Merkel told the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung on Saturday. “For years we’ve been deceiving ourselves about this. Mosques, for example, are going to be a more prominent part of our cities than they were before,” she added.
    Xenophobia or Xenophilia?

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    '"He is not past and remote. He is still everywhere to be feared," says Mr Ottomeyer.'

    Absolutely, his ghost made me trip on my shoelaces yesterday, oh the horror! The guilt about a war that was fought before my dad was born has become too much, excuse me while I go do some medieval penance.
    There are more things in heaven and earth, than are dreamt of in your philosophy. -Hamlet

    On the heights, the paths are paved with daggers. -The Wheel of Time

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    Hitler Mania: Popular Berlin Exhibition Is Extended Three Weeks

    Daily Mail (Britain)

    So many people have been flocking to Germany's first postwar exhibition devoted to Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler that it has been extended by three weeks. Over the past three months, 'Hitler and the Germans' has attracted more than 170,000 visitors. The Berlin exhibition, which will now run until February 27, explores explores the links between German society and Hitler's rise to power in 1933, and how he managed not only to win power but to cling on to it even as total defeat loomed.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ded-weeks.html

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    Impact on German society: The curators of the exhibition are at pains to stress that their focus is on the society that created the dictator and not Hitler, the man
    Heaven forbid the curious people who came to this exhibit to learn about the Hitler that they are forbidden to learn about find out who he really was!


    I guess museums aren't objective places of history anymore.

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