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Thread: Right-Wing On the Rise in the German Countries

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    Right-Wing On the Rise in the German Countries

    [Xenophobia in Austria? Attitudes toward migration, foreign population, and the state's policy on foreigners]

    [Article in German]

    Holzer W, Munz R.

    PIP: "At present some 700,000 foreigners (almost 9% of the total population) are living in Austria, about 280,000 of which are in the labor market. A representative sample of Austrians between 20 and 54 years [of age] were asked about their attitudes toward foreign population and migration policy." The findings indicate that various degrees of higher tolerance were correlated with being young, male, urban, living in a province with a high foreign population, and high socioeconomic status. "Stepping up the integration of the foreign population...is supported by a minority of Austrians only; as for the education of the children of immigrants, the Austrian attitude is a more generous one." (EXCERPT)

    PMID: 12321137 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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    Senior Member Mac Seafraidh's Avatar
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    Right-Wing Attitudes On the Rise in the German Countries

    Germany shudders over rise of far right

    Extremists make stunning gains in eastern GermanyBy Andreas Bechmann and
    Andy Eckardt

    NBC News

    Updated: 9:03 a.m. ET Nov. 30, 2004 MAINZ, Germany - Nestled between the river Elbe and a 13th-century castle, Koenigstein was until recently best known as a gateway to a very popular national park in Saxony. The small eastern German town, with its 3,200 inhabitants, draws its living from the tourism industry in a region that has been battling high unemployment since German reunification.

    Nowadays it also has a different, more sinister reputation. On June 13, 2004, the right-wing Nationale Partei Deutschlands (German National Party) won 21.1 percent of the vote in two council elections, a stunning success that was followed by a strong showing in state elections, when it garnered 9.1 percent of the vote.

    The town and the region were quickly branded a Nazi stronghold. Koenigstein, which is located close to the German-Czech border, was overwhelmed with interview requests from Germany's leading newspapers and television stations, and worried that the extensive coverage could hurt its vital tourism.

    Not long afterwards, the local tourism board shut down its Web site guest book as readers expressed their dismay, often in crude terms, over the NPD's success. It also called a meeting with local entrepreneurs and other officials to find ways to fix the image problem.

    It’s a problem that may defy a quick fix, and which could have wider long-term impact.

    Between the years 1990 and 2000 alone, approximately 350 American companies had invested over 18 billion euros ($21 billion) in eastern Germany. Locals worry the bad publicity could hurt further investment in a region that badly needs foreign investment.

    Reacting to poor economy?
    Mayor Frieder Haase blames the poor economy for the success of the far-right party. "I am convinced, no, I am certain, that the majority of votes are protest votes," he said. "And, I doubt that all of the voters actually know, who they have elected," Haase said.

    But Haase, who has no party affiliation, warned that the extremists can’t be ignored. "Democracy must deal with these parties and politics must do everything to change the election behavior which we see at the moment," he said.

    The NPD has held seats on the town council for more than five years. "They do nothing productive, and therefore it is hard to work with them in our council," the mayor said.

    For most politicians, it’s impossible to work with the NPD because its policies are entirely beyond the pale of German politics. The party wants to do away with democracy and envisions a larger Germany that would include parts of Poland, Russia and the Czech Republic, incorporated in what was once the "German Reich."

    But to their alarm, an increasing number of Saxony residents have found a new political favorite in Uwe Leichsenring of the NPD, the businesslike driving school owner who in the past has admitted having contacts with the banned neo-Nazi group, "Skinheads Saxon Switzerland (SSS).

    At a recent trial, Dresden's high court charged 42 members of the group with the formation of a criminal organization, incitement of racial hatred and inflicting dangerous bodily harm.

    Leichsenring, himself, also faced some related minor charges that were eventually dropped in return for the payment of a fine.

    Feeding on disaffected youth
    Experts like Hans Vorlaender, professor for political sciences at the University of Dresden, believe that Germany must dramatically improve its political education. "We have to counter the possibility that right-wing voters will be born out of our youth culture," he said.

    "What I am missing at the moment is a vehement reaction from politicians and from the public," Vorlaender said.

    Over the past few years extremists groups have sharpened their message as well as their recruiting strategies in Germany. "There is a stable right-wing extremist voting behavior," said a member of the state’s intelligence services, speaking on condition of anonymity.

    Vorlaender said the answer was more complex. "Since the far-left PDS [Partei des Demokratischen Sozialismus], the former communist East German party, has been integrated into the political landscape, the only parties left to express dissatisfaction seem to be the ones on the political far right," he said.

    "Economic problems and hopelessness are compensated by electing far-right parties,” Vorlaender said. “They give easy answers for complicated social and economical failures. We call it the rat-catcher effect."

    However, Vorlaender cautioned against making too much of the success of the NPD and the other right-wing party, Deutsche Volksunion (German People's Union). The two organizations have agreed to join forces ahead of the 2006 national elections under a United National Front. "Today Saxony, tomorrow Germany" is the battle cry as they vie for seats in Germany’s parliament, the Bundestag.

    "It is a wrong perception to create a picture of a new rising German Nazi movement,” he said, noting previous waves of success for right-wing parties in local elections, followed by failure at the national level.

    "Germany, as a functioning democracy, has always managed to cope with its far right," Vorlaender said.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6612049/

    I see the "far-right" a positive thing, but they MUST get rid of the people that have criminal records or if they do, or not.

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    Islamophobia On Rise In Germany: Study

    Islamophobia On Rise In Germany: Study



    By Khaled Schmitt, IOL Correspondent


    BERLIN, December 26 (IslamOnline.net) - Islamophobia is on the rise in Germany, with many people in the European country seeing Islam as incompatible with the western culture and civilization, a new survey unveiled.
    A survey of 3000 people of different ages and educational and social backgrounds found that 65 per cent totally reject Islam, claiming that its precincts are not harmonious with the atmosphere in the West.
    Some 25 per cent of the respondents oppose allowing new Muslim immigrants into the country, while 59 per cent believe the number of foreigners has increased beyond limits, showed the study conducted by University of Bielefeld’s Institute for Interdisciplinary Research on Conflict and Violence.
    Furthermore, 30 per cent call for deporting foreigners if unemployment rates hit record highs and job opportunities for Germans turned scare.
    Asked whether they would like to live in districts heavily populated by Muslims such as Kreuzberg, 50 per cent answered in negative and 65 per cent had doubts about their Muslim neighbors.
    Some 30 per cent felt alienated in the society due to the heavy Muslim presence in the country, according to the study.


    Surprises


    The results of the survey revealed several surprises, including the rising anti-Islamic sentiments among middle-class Germans, rather than being limited to right-extremist groups.
    The second is the readiness to express these biased views in public, while the third surprise was a clear conclusion that negative Muslim stereotypes are widely spreading among Germans regardless of their various social stripes.
    People who had expressed theses views explicitly were encouraged by a section of society that had overcome hesitation and fear to do so, the pollsters said.
    The Institute put at five million the number of Muslims against 82 million of the whole population.
    The study also took the blame to some politicians, who helped raise public sentiments against foreigners and minorities to chalk up remarkable gains.
    Observers said Islamophobia also witnessed an increase in other European countries.
    French experts and activists in the field of human rights have warned of the unprecedented escalation of Islamophobia and racism in France during the past two years.


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    Post AW: Islamophobia On Rise In Germany: Study

    Europe Sees More Anti-Islam Incidents


    Some fear the French hijab ban could be enforced outside state schools.(AFP)


    PARIS/BERLIN, December 23 (IslamOnline.net & News Agencies) – Muslim women in France were again discriminated against over their hijab while a mosque in Germany was the target of an apparent arson attack.

    The central police station in Sanz Sans, a Paris suburb, denied five hijab-clad women entry to a city hall where three of them were to attend their naturalization ceremony, although there is no law justifying the move, the London-based Arabic-speaking daily Al-Hayat reported on Thursday, December 23.

    The French newspaper Liberation quoted Hamida Bin Saadia, the head of a femal equality group, as saying the women were asked by police officers to remove hijab before entering the ceremony hall.

    The officers said they got the orders from their bosses, Bin Saadia said, adding that the deputy chief of the station gave a nod to the move.

    He claimed that the orders did not came in compliance with a specific law, but with the principles marking such a symbolic ceremony in which national anthem was played and integration highlighted, she said.

    France recently adopted a controversial bill banning hijab and religious insignia in only public schools, which came into effect with the beginning of the academic year in September.

    However, the director of the Sanz Sans police station, Michel Tope, reserved the right to ban any religious statement in an official ceremony as that held for naturalization, Al-Hayat reported.

    The targeted women said they were surrounded by some ten policemen after they refused to take off hijab.

    Al-Hayat said such separate incidents raise questions as to whether the French government would push the hijab ban in areas other than schools.

    The French ban drew protests across the world, with the US-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) dismissing it as “discriminatory.”

    Islam sees hijab as an obligatory code of dress, not a symbol of religious statement as crucifixes of Christianity or Kappa of Judaism.

    Mosque Attacks


    A file photo of a mosque in Germany



    Meanwhile, a mosque in the western German town of Usingen was damaged by a fire which broke out early on Thursday.

    German police said they were investigating the cause of the blaze, which was spotted by a motorist at 5:20 am (0420 GMT) and extinguished by the fire brigade, reported Reuters.

    “Detectives are investigating all possible causes,” said police spokesman Siegfried Schlott.

    “We haven't ruled anything out,” he said when asked if it was an arson attack.

    No one was hurt in the fire which caused about 50,000 euros ($67,000) worth in damage, Schlott said.

    Usingen, a small town of about 35,000, is 50 kilometers (30 miles) northwest of Frankfurt.

    In November, following arson attacks on mosques in neighboring Netherlands, a petrol bomb thrown at a mosque in the German southwestern town of Sinsheim destroyed its entrance and caused about 10,000 euros damage.

    The blaze came a few weeks a series of Muslim sites and mosques came under racist attacks possibly linked to the murder of a controversial filmmaker in neighboring Holland.

    That has raised fears that the tension could spill over and move across borders to Germany.

    Germany recently proposed an action plan to fight extremism and promote Muslim integration in society.

    Five years ago, only 65 percent of the estimated 2.1 million Turks in Germany felt they were being treated as second-class citizens compared to 80 percent in 2004, according to a recent study by the Turkish Studies Center in the Rhein region.

    A study conducted by the University of Bielefeld’s Institute for Interdisciplinary Research on Conflict and Violence had also shown that Islamophobia was on the rise in Germany.

    http://www.islamonline.org/English/N...rticle04.shtml

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    Right-Wing Attitudes On the Rise in Germany

    Paper: Far-Right Extremists on the Rise


    The number of known right-wing extremists in Germany rose sharply last year to 3,800, the Tagesspiegel newspaper reported Friday. The Berlin daily, citing security experts, said that 800 more people became known to the authorities as neo-Nazis in 2004. It said the areas worst-hit by the phenomenon were the city state of Berlin and Brandenburg, the relatively poor eastern region that surrounds the capital. The report said some 950 neo-Nazis were now active in Berlin, compared to 750 in 2003, and 300 in Brandenburg, 80 more than the previous year. It noted that around 10,000 people were involved in Germany's skinhead movement. Far-right political parties made big gains in state elections last year, as voters voiced their anger at Chancellor Schröder's failure to cut unemployment and revive the economy.

    http://www.dw-world.de/dw/briefs/0,1574,1451432,00.html

    :icon_ques

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristallnacht
    Paper: Far-Right Extremists on the Rise


    The number of known right-wing extremists in Germany rose sharply last year to 3,800, the Tagesspiegel newspaper reported Friday. The Berlin daily, citing security experts, said that 800 more people became known to the authorities as neo-Nazis in 2004. It said the areas worst-hit by the phenomenon were the city state of Berlin and Brandenburg, the relatively poor eastern region that surrounds the capital. The report said some 950 neo-Nazis were now active in Berlin, compared to 750 in 2003, and 300 in Brandenburg, 80 more than the previous year. It noted that around 10,000 people were involved in Germany's skinhead movement. Far-right political parties made big gains in state elections last year, as voters voiced their anger at Chancellor Schröder's failure to cut unemployment and revive the economy.

    http://www.dw-world.de/dw/briefs/0,1574,1451432,00.html

    :icon_ques
    Hmn, makes you think...

    What is a "right wing extremist" exactly?

    And what is it with this extremely manipulative rhetoric; ,,the areas worst-hit by the phenomenon"...? Very objective!... :

    And the reasons given; ,,Far-right political parties made big gains in state elections last year, as voters voiced their anger at Chancellor Schröder's failure to cut unemployment and revive the economy." Where do they get that from - how about the anger and dissatisfaction caused by mistaken immigration policy? :icon1: :icon_surp :icon_arro :speechles

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    It is of course not just random that they brand "us" as "right-extremists". I'd rather call us "left-extremists" if we are to use such meaningless brands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonas
    Where do they get that from - how about the anger and dissatisfaction caused by mistaken immigration policy? :icon1: :icon_surp :icon_arro :speechles
    immigration Is not a worst problem in "East" Germany (where the nationalist parties made big gains in state elections last year). It is to 97 % a white aryan District, but not more for long when the people don't wake up and fight.

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    Germany Fights Right-Wing Extremism

    "Nazis out!" reads the poster during a protest march in Saxony

    German President Horst Köhler has called on all Germans to actively oppose anti-Semitism, while politicians across the spectrum debate banning the right-wing NPD party.
    Read more: Germany Fights Right-Wing Extremism

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    Post AW: Germany Fights Right-Wing Extremism

    there was ample reason to be concerned about new facets of anti-Semitism which expressed themselves most outwardly in criticism of Israel and the US.
    The alliance of the current government to Israel and the U.S could not be made more clear.


    With five million jobless, Germany has broken an absolute record, Stoiber said, and added that if the 1.5 million people Economics Minister Wolfgang Clement said are involved in work programs are added to the figure, “Germany will find itself in a situation not unlike that of 1932.”
    Interesting parallel. I was just reading a document today published by the London Insitute of Economics, entitled "Nazi Economic Policy 1933-1939," which grudgingly admitted that under National Socialism:


    Unemployment had fallen from 6 million in 1933 to 300,000 by 1939
    I have attached the document for reference. It also contains interesting statistics on the Strength through Joy organization.

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