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Thread: Mapping Ancient Germania – Berlin Researchers Crack the Ptolemy Code

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    Mapping Ancient Germania – Berlin Researchers Crack the Ptolemy Code

    It seems that beloved Deutschland has those 2000 years of culture!

    A 2nd century map of Germania by the scholar Ptolemy has always stumped scholars, who were unable to relate the places depicted to known settlements. Now a team of researchers have cracked the code, revealing that half of Germany's cities are 1,000 years older than previously thought.

    The founding of Rome has been pinpointed to the year 753. For the city of St. Petersburg, records even indicate the precise day the first foundation stone was laid.

    Historians don't have access to this kind of precision when it comes to German cities like Hanover, Kiel or Bad Driburg. The early histories of nearly all the German cities east of the Rhine are obscure, and the places themselves are not mentioned in documents until the Middle Ages. So far, no one has been able to date the founding of these cities.

    Our ancestors' lack of education is to blame for this dearth of knowledge. Germanic tribes certainly didn't run land survey offices -- they couldn't even write. Inhabitants this side of the Rhine -- the side the Romans never managed to occupy permanently -- used only a clumsy system of runes.

    According to the Roman historian Tacitus, people here lived in thatched huts and dugout houses, subsisting on barley soup and indulging excessively in dice games. Not much more is known, as there are next to no written records of life within the barbarians' lands.

    Astonishing New Map

    That may now be changing. A group of classical philologists, mathematical historians and surveying experts at Berlin Technical University's Department for Geodesy and Geoinformation Science has produced an astonishing map of central Europe as it was 2,000 years ago.
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/...720513,00.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by cortodanzigese View Post
    It seems that beloved Deutschland has those 2000 years of culture!


    http://www.spiegel.de/international/...720513,00.html
    Very interesting. I'd like to here more about other old European cities. I'd think that ancient Stockholm would be neat to see.

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