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Thread: On Germanic Shamanism

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ocko View Post
    To criticize shamanism you should practice it. Otherwise you criticize what you have no experience with.
    Indeed. It is 100% an experienced thing. That's why it's always a bit ridiculous to read PhD thesis about shamanism, written in a very academic language, as if this was something you observe and analyze instead of practicing .

    Here is more info on Germanic male shamanism: Seiðmaðr and Earl – The Male Sorcerer or Shaman

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ocko View Post
    Odin is considered a master shaman.

    Jesus healed people through magic

    It looks more that shamanism is the core of any religion.
    If I recall correctly, there is never a time when Odin is called a shaman. He was a master of all things magical, whether dealing with runes or seidr or poetic inspiration, but seeing those things as "shamanic" is retrospectively applying a particular interpretive lens toward the data we have. Whether the ancient practitioners of these magical forms would have seen their magic or their magical deities (like Odin and Freya) as having anything to do with circumpolar shamanism is unknown to us.

    Part of the problem is the definition of shamanism. This is touched upon on the Wikipedia entry on shamanism:

    "There is no single agreed-upon definition for the word "shamanism" among anthropologists. The English historian Ronald Hutton noted that by the dawn of the 21st century, there were four separate definitions of the term which appeared to be in use. The first of these uses the term to refer to "anybody who contacts a spirit world while in an altered state of consciousness." The second definition limits the term to refer to those who contact a spirit world while in an altered state of consciousness at the behest of others. The third definition attempts to distinguish shamans from other magico-religious specialists who are believed to contact spirits, such as "mediums", "witch doctors", "spiritual healers" or "prophets," by claiming that shamans undertake some particular technique not used by the others. Problematically, scholars advocating the third view have failed to agree on what the defining technique should be. The fourth definition identified by Hutton uses "shamanism" to refer to the indigenous religions of Siberia and neighboring parts of Asia."
    Going by this, the first definition is so broad as to be meaningless since anything dealing with direct experience of spiritual realities would be "shamanistic." The second and third definitions are also sufficiently vague, but in any case while it is certain that the ancient Germanic people had spiritual healers and prophets (the volur, etc.), it is also certain that witch-doctors and prophets are a far cry from true initiates, i.e. those who have attained self-mastery and gnosis/transcendence/immortality. The latter goal, which also was thought to often bring with it supernatural power (siddhis, etc.), is the esoteric core of any true higher "religious tradition" as Guenon discusses. In this regard, shamanism is indeed a deterioration or at least inferior aspect of the higher Tradition.

    This is why I believe that any attempts at reconstruction or revitalization of a Germanic (or other European pagan tradition) should not look toward shamanism but some of the higher esoteric traditions I mentioned in my previous post. To take the ancient Greek example, one should be seeking a Germanic equivalent to the Eleusinian Mysteries, Hermeticism, and Neoplatonism rather than shamanism.

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    To expect that the Edda calls Odin a shaman is a bit silly.

    Odins practices like shape shifting, hanging in a tree, going through a death experience etc are plain shamanic practices.
    weel nich will dieken dej mot wieken

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ocko View Post
    To expect that the Edda calls Odin a shaman is a bit silly.

    Odins practices like shape shifting, hanging in a tree, going through a death experience etc are plain shamanic practices.
    The classic European concept "Wizzard" or "Witch" can do this things. However the Ancient Gods (Germanic, Roman, etc.) were so anthropomorph, they had this kind of journeys, contrast Yahweh, who all day plays Texas Hold'em with Jesus, Holy Maria, the Kerubims and the Archangels in the 7th Heaven.

    "Remember that, even when those who move you be kings or men of power, your soul is in your keeping alone. When you stand before God, you cannot say, "But I was told by others to do thus,"or that virtue "was not convenient at the time." This will not suffice."
    /King Baldwin IV in the Kingdom of Heaven/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ocko View Post
    To expect that the Edda calls Odin a shaman is a bit silly.

    Odins practices like shape shifting, hanging in a tree, going through a death experience etc are plain shamanic practices.
    Again, I guess it depends on what your definition of shamanism is. Going through a death experience is something that existed in the ancient Greek Mysteries and other forms of esoteric initiation but neither are connected to shamanism, unless one calls all such experiences shamanistic. Shape shifting was something various Daoist wizards or Hindu yogis claimed to do, but again these don't derive from shamanism.

    As to the tree Odin was hanged on, from what I've read the tree was apparently Yggdrasil, the cosmos itself, not a literal tree, though it is possible that it reflected some sort of actual practice.

    In any case, I am not saying that there is no connection to shamanism, just that it is up to debate as to whether the ancient Germanic religion was shamanism or connected to it. If it is indeed connected to shamanism, I'd say that it would be of ultimately pre-Indo-European/non-Aryan origin and perhaps connected with surrounding Northern people such as the Lapps. I would also maintain what I said earlier, namely that true esotericism is different to and superior to shamanism, and shamanism is only superior to religious traditions who have lost nearly all transformative and experiential dimensions (such as most of modern Christianity, especially most Protestantism.)

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    If you look at the Venus of Brassempuoy



    You see a woman without mouth, she cannot talk, she is silent.

    Compare that to St.Pauls 'women have to be silent in Church'

    You see a direct line from Paleolithic shamanism to Christianity.

    I don't see the idea that the Paleolithic time was religious.

    Further, if you count the number of sections in her hair you will find it is 30.

    The number 30 you also find in the bible: Jesus started to teach at age 30.
    (Also related: every hair is counted ((the 'hair' is a single thought and 'counted' means being present to it, most likely one of the 30 exercises)

    The 30 most likely means exercises to be mastered, or the reaching of a certain stage.

    After which one is silent on the insight.

    Woman in general in the bible (and most likely prehistory) means 'emotions'. So 'woman' have to silent in Church, the inner sacred place, as for Christians, while in prayer, meditation etc.

    The prehistoric S expressed that through a little figure, the bible uses words.


    Through shamanism one can see the developement.

    It might well be that, what you understand as religion, was a combined practice in prehistoric with shamanism and that the separation is a distinction of newer time.

    During and shortly after the missionary succeeded in 'convincing' the old believers to convert, you find a lot of superstition and folk-practices in the people, to this day, practically. These 'superstitions' and practices have a source, which is most likely a sort of shamanism.

    Shamanism is seeing what is behind the veil of appearance. Ordinary people see the same as a shaman, but the shaman can connect the dots because he knows. Omens, signs etc are part of shamanism (and also Christianity)

    Oracles like that from Delphi, or the ones of the Nornes, given about any newborn, saying what the child was in former lifetimes, what it is going through in this lifetime and which task it has are very basic shamanic exercises.

    Interestingly Odin was not able to foresee the future, that's why he had to resurrect the Vala, he also didn't know the past, as he has to coax the knowledge from the Giants.

    Obviously Odin was versatile in all shamanic practices but the use of it was familiar to him.
    weel nich will dieken dej mot wieken

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    Odin’s Inner Visions

    By Nigel Pennick

    Since the earliest times, it seems, people have tried to gain visions of the future. The belief that it is possible to foresee what is to come may have its origins in the world of dreams. In dreams, people are able to visit places long since destroyed, or places that do not exist in the material world. They can talk with the dead, meet beings who have no material existence, or sometimes even see events that come to pass later in the real world. Similarly, the delirious visions experienced by the drugged, sick, and dying often involve visions of the world to come.

    In the same way, carefully employed techniques of envisioning and meditation can produce experiences beyond everyday consciousness, allowing us to journey into the inner space of the mind and thus gain valuable knowledge. Such techniques have been used by soothsayers and seers in order to enter this dangerous and uncharted inner landscape. They may climb alone onto almost airless mountaintops. They may enter deep trances that mimic death itself. They may eat and drink dangerous and sometimes toxic substances. They may fast and perform ceremonial rites of self-injury, willing undergoing ordeals at the edge of death. As a result of these dangerous practices, they experience dreams, hallucinations, or visions. Those returning to some level of sanity after such experiences (for some are destroyed by them) are believed to have brought back with them information about other worlds, including that of the future.

    In legend, the runes were discovered by the god Odin through a self-inflicted ordeal. Some of the signs in the ancient rock carvings are identical to the characters of the alphabet that gave rise to the runes, so it is probable that a gifted individual joined the two systems together, bringing the runes into being. This act of creative insight is symbolized in the Norse poem Havamal, written as the words of Odin. It tells us:

    I know that I hung on the windswept tree for nine days and nine nights. Stuck with a spear, bloodied for Odin, myself an offering to myself, bound to that tree whose roots no one knows where they go. No one gave me bread, no one gave me drink, down into the depths I looked to take up the runes. Screaming, I fell back from that place.”

    In the Norse pantheon, Odin is the god of magic, poetry, divination, and inspiration, qualities that, in ancient societies, were possessed by shamans. The word “shaman” comes from the Tungus of Siberia, and means “exalted” or “excited.” A shaman, therefore, is a person who combines the functions of diviner, medicine-person, and mediator between the worlds of humans and transcendental powers — spirits, demons, or gods. Shamans were important people in ancient tribal societies before established priesthoods came into being. The remnants of Northern European shamanry exist to this day in the surviving guising and mumming traditions of midwinter.

    Shamanry gives direct access to other-worldly states of being that cannot be reached in normal consciousness. To gain access to this otherworld, shamans undergo self-destructive processes. They experience the psychic trauma of being dismembered, scattered through the worlds, and finally re-assembled. Anyone who survives this ordeal overcomes the horror, becoming reintegrated as a person with special powers. Sometimes this happens spontaneously, as the result of an injury or illness. But more often it is done knowingly. Odin’s ordeal is a good description of just such a shamanic initiation. His torment was concluded by a flash of insight that allowed him to release the full potential of the runes for human use. Such moments, when the two sides of the brain, analytical and intuitive, are linked by a unified response, are rare in human experience.


    Such visions as Odin’s have a basis in neurological fact. Neurophysiologists have discovered what they call “phosphenes,” geometrical shapes and images in the brain’s visual cortex and neural system. Phosphenes are present in everyone. We can see them with shut eyes. They also appear to us when our consciousness is altered, such as in a trance or during meditation, when geometric shapes resembling alphabetic letters often appear in the early stages of the trance state.

    The legend of Odin seems to recall a conscious realization and classification of the inner phosphene patterns of the brain. If this is true, the runes relate to the “nerve circuitry” of each human being.
    http://www.renegadetribune.com/odins-inner-visions/

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    Core-shamanism, oracular seid, and what Seidr really is

    Unfortunately, shamanic tradition has been infected by Harnerism, which has further corrupted those in Heathenry today who claim to practice and teach Seidr.

    Dr. Harner and his Foundation for Shamanic Studies have single-handedly tainted the definition of ‘shaman’; which is understandable in the neopagan community, but bothersome within Heathenry. ‘Bothersome’ because, as a Heathen, this is my personal folkway – the ‘way’ of my ‘folk’ – which is historic fact, not alternative fabrication.

    You see, Harner introduced his non-cultural approach to shamanism back in the 1970s; toss in a side of Castenada (from the 1960s), and you have the impetus of the modern neoshaman movement. If its adherents were more upfront about what they do this would not be an issue, but they continue to identify themselves as ‘shamans’ when they are simply drumming neopagans without a community to minister to.

    You see, “core-shamanism” (akin to “oracular seid”) is a non-cultural hedgerow upon the path, one where most people stop and reside without ever making the effort to look over the boundary, let alone continue the journey.

    Regarding core-shamanism, it assumes that “the West overwhelmingly lost its shamanic knowledge centuries ago due to religious oppression”, and that all said “medicine men and women” employ “drug techniques”, “repetitive drumming”, and “soul retrieval”. Then, regarding “oracular seidr”, Paxson describes it as “analogous to the "core" shamanic practices identified by Michael Harner, which could then be combined with mythology and historical examples from given cultures to recreate versions of the practice appropriate for use in traditions such as the Celtic or Greek.” (She fails to mention that what she has 'combined' here is her Wiccan and Umbanda Voodoo practices.)

    In these circumstances the comparative relationship between “god” and “ego” becomes clear; for example, there is the ‘god complex’ and the ‘ego complex’. Likewise there is: ‘ego authenticity’ and ‘god authenticity’; ‘ego voice’ and ‘god voice’; ‘ego consciousness’ and ‘god consciousness’; ‘ego centeredness’ and ‘god centeredness’; ‘ego traits’ and ‘god traits’; and the list is endless. This is an important point because of the commonly held definition of shaman is, “an intermediary or messenger between the human world and the spirit world", or, "a person who acts as intermediary between the natural and supernatural worlds." So that, those who practice core-shamanism, or oracular-seid, or any method that places itself between “gods and men”, is bound to be mired in ego.

    However, the challenge is not so much in Harner and what he has done to genuine shamanic practices, or Paxson and how her technique has promoted slothful research and passionless “performances”, but in how the word shaman is now defined; namely (and again), “an intermediary or messenger between the human world and the spirit world", or, "a person who acts as intermediary between the natural and supernatural worlds".

    You see, this definition comes either from the outside – from anthropologists and historians who research or study tribal shamans and/or shamanics – or from those who have been schooled in core- or unauthentic shamanism. For example, let’s examine a few of the most popular shamanic books:

    1-Shamanism : Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy, 1951, Mircea Eliade
    Eliade never actual met an indigenous shaman. His over generalizations lie at the root of non-cultural shamanic practices today. Further, his lack of empirical support and far right / political conclusions continue to overshadow genuine work being carried out in both the field of research and practice.

    2-The Way of the Shaman, 1990, Michael Harner
    Harner originated ‘core shamanism’, which “does not hold a fixed belief system, but instead focuses on the practice of shamanic journeying and may on an individual basis integrate indigenous shamanism, the teachings of Carlos Castaneda and other spiritualities.” Overall, his works propagate the practice of cultural appropriation, and so encourage misrepresentation of the various cultures he claims to have been inspired by. Harner’s works have almost single-handedly laid the foundation for massive exploitation of Indigenous cultures by "plastic shamans" and other cultural thieves.

    3-Animal-Speak: The Spiritual & Magical Powers of Creatures Great & Small, 1996, Ted Andrews
    Andrews as a “clairvoyant and aura interpreter”, who did “past-life analysis and dream interpretation”, “numerology and Tarot”. He was a public school teacher who was interested in “esoteric forms of healing with sound, music, and voice”. He never trained as a shaman.

    4-The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge (1968); A Separate Reality (1972); and Journey to Ixtlan (1971), Carlos Castaneda
    From his first book, notable anthropologists specializing in Yaqui Indian culture questioned the accuracies of Castenada's work. This is worth remembering in that Castaneda wrote all three books as an anthropology student at UCLA, and was awarded a bachelor and doctoral degree based on their content. From the numerous contradictions regarding time, location, sequence and description of events, to eyewitness accounts that he was never in Mexico during the periods his books detail he was, to the lack of Yaqui vocabulary, and to the clear synthesis of shamanisms from elsewhere (not particular to Mexico, and in some cases, that hemisphere), his work has been resoundingly discounted.

    5-The Celtic Shaman: A Handbook, 1991, John Matthews
    An attempt to reconstruct Celtic shamanic tradition from a gaping absence of any such practice; better to describe this as Celtic neopaganism with various shamanic techniques added in. Animal totems and their numerical correspondences, to their directions are typical examples of core-shamanism. Couple this with no internal citations, no foot- or endnotes, and this “pivotal book to the practice of modern shamanism” is an incomplete understanding of even the most fundamental of shamanic concepts.

    6-Shamanism As a Spiritual Practice for Daily Life, 1996, Tom Cowan
    Cowan trained with Michael Harner, and according to his bio “he combines universal core shamanism with traditional European spirit lore to create spiritual practices”, and “Tom met Michael Harner from whom he learned core shamanism which continues to be Tom's primary spiritual practice.”

    7-Soul Retrieval, 2006, Sandra Ingerman
    Ingerman is a psychology counselor who has trained extensively with Michael Harner, and has worked as the Educational Director for his foundation.

    8-The Book of the Shaman: Walk the Ancient Path of the Shaman and Find Inner Peace, 2001, Nicolas Wood
    According to his website, “His own practice is a mix of Mongolian, Tibetan, Siberian and Native American traditions.”

    9-In the Shadow of the Shaman: Connecting with Self, Nature & Spirit, 2002, Amber Wolfe
    Wolfe’s website describes her as “follow[ing] an American Shamanic path”, a “Ban Drui” or a “Wise Woman, Druidess, White Oak Woman and Faerie Doctor”, and as a “Wiccan author”.

    10-The Book of Shamanic Healing, 2002, Kristin Madden
    According to Madden’s website she “blends Eastern and Western mystic paths”, is a “Druid and tutor in the Order of Bards, Ovates, and Druids”, a “member of the Druid College of Healing and is on the Board of Silver Moon Health Services.” She self-identifies as a “Pagan”.

    The argument here is that these works all have a common root: core-shamanism, which is recognized by anthropologists and historians as not only inaccurate but cited as “cultural imperialism” by indigenous tribes worldwide. In the examples cited above, the authors introduce a form of thinking and language, dress and personal adornment, music and art, social behavior and religion that is far removed from their indigenous cultural contexts. Native Americans and First Nations activists have coined a term for such individuals and their writings: Plastic Shamans. Specifically, plastic shamans are “individuals who are attempting to pass themselves off as shamans, holy people, or other traditional spiritual leaders, but who have no genuine connection to the traditions or cultures they claim to represent. In some cases, the "plastic shaman" may have some genuine cultural connection, but is seen to be exploiting that knowledge for ego, power or money.” Further, “plastic shamans are believed by their critics to use the mystique of these cultural traditions, and the legitimate curiosity of sincere seekers, for personal gain; in some cases, exploitation of students and traditional culture may involve the selling of fake "traditional" spiritual ceremonies, fake artifacts, fictional accounts in books, illegitimate tours of sacred sites, and often the chance to buy spiritual titles.”

    Over the years I have heard the reasoning for “incorporating” practices not native to Northern Europe, and to each there is a ready answer: Delve deeper.

    You see, there is in fact a great wealth of information available to us on the subject of Heathenry, likewise Seiðr. Two of my favorite observations on this fact come from H.R.E. Davidson:

    “Devotion to the past which is so characteristic of Norse literature has left us such a record as is offered by no other early literature in North-West Europe”

    “As far as Old Norse literature is concerned there is little reason to complain of the scantiness of the filed, which is bewildering by its richness rather than depressing by its barrenness.”

    So that over the years I have taken Davidson’s advice to heart; namely, “The necessary first step in rediscovering the nature of heathen thought in Scandinavia is to discover how much has been caught up and preserved in the literature we possess, and to assess carefully the extent of the wealth at our disposal before we trace out its origins.”

    And this is exactly what I have been doing for the past thirty plus years: delving deep into the historical record to discern from the many Northern European tribes the very nature of their most intimate connection to the divine. And I have been a diligent gardener; for, as a Seiðwoman – a culturally specific ‘magic’ user – not only have I carefully weeded out, at every turn, the external influences and interpretations, but have been ever mindful to exclude a biased interpretation (or to reimagine Seiðr in my own image). Certainly, this has been the road least traveled, the path overgrown for lack of use, but ineffably rewarding for the remarkable insight and application that can only be had from such determined diligence and enduring patience.

    Therefore, unlike the books above, which are examples of outsiders looking into a cultural structure, or worse still, ignoring an existing cultural structure and abundant history, I am an insider exploring from the heart of my own cultural structure.

    Returning again to the standardly applied definition of a shaman, “an intermediary or messenger between the human world and the spirit world; a person who acts as intermediary between the natural and supernatural worlds". Let me state simply what a true shaman does – an individual who is cultural attuned to the spiritual roots of their folkway – and so therefore a true Seiðfolk: They are intermediaries between the human community and the larger ecological field. They ensure that there is a felicitous flow of nourishment from local land, sea and sky back to human folk. For through their vigilant observation of celestial and terrestrial tides, Sitting-out, and accessing of Wyrd Consciousness, Seiðfolk ensure that the relationship between the Old Ways and modern ways, the Above and Below Worlds and Middle World, the Past and Future and the Present, the human and the wights of nature, all remain composed and reciprocal. In this way, the tribe never takes more from land, sea and sky than it gifts to it – materially and prayerfully, and with gratitude and praise.

    Both harvest and hunt are constant paradigms of reciprocally negotiated and so mutually supported activities between tribe and nature. Hence the dual importance of kindred; first as a human support element, and second in that every member of a kindred is responsible for working at being attuned to the Others – those beings, influences, vibrations, and the like that surround, support, sustain and so influence daily life. And though every Heathen should be engaged with the Unseen, it is the Seiðu alone that leads the way, the sole voyager into the Between, the singular strategist and negotiator in all dealings with Otherkin.

    Clearly then, this is not a task left to new age sojourns and externally influenced cultural intrusions. As such, the guarantee of Heathenry’s future is the due diligence of those who would bear the Stang and Stone, of Wyrd and Weave.
    Source: http://vinlands-volva.blogspot.com/2...-and-what.html


    Die Sonne scheint noch.

  9. #79
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    As one can divide into the everyday world and the hidden spiritual world (I know both is interwoven, but for the sake of argument I keep the distinction).

    Cultural in this case is an element of the everyday world. Thus cultural most likely then means the technique to get into the spiritual world. When successful mist everyone deals with a strange world, no matter how you got there.

    Therefore I wouldn't dismiss 'core-shamanism' as it shows a way to get there.

    The way to get there has elements which are at least similar in different cultures.

    What might be the big difference is the entities you are attracting/approaching. A heathen would be naturally tending to his/her own folk spirits.

    It is also a question of your interest. What do you try to get from 'shamanism'?

    Insight, foresight, power, healing, methods to help people, fight enemies of your folk, be a support for 'Gods' etc pp.

    Sooner or later you will find a group of entities you 'resonate' with and which support you with your and most likely their aims.

    So, for me the cultural aspect is interesting but not that crucial, the bigger and more important part is the spiritual world.

    For me to be Aryan is not so much the physical existence as the spiritual existence, as it transcendents time and location. It is the spirit, or better my spirit, which makes me who I am. (To use your 'ego'/'God' comparison.)

    As humans are tripartite there is a temporary aspect, the physical existence, and a timeless existence the duo soul and spirit. (Compare the atoms of a neutron/positron ((positive and neutral)) and the temporary electron ((negative)). It is actually one of the highe laws belonging to the 3).

    To the physical belongs the culture, which are emanations from other souls/spirits and thus worthy to uphold for refinement and nourishment for the soul.

    To connect to your soul/spirit and use it to get to their level is entering the spiritual world. The technique may differ but the end result should be the same.

    As everyone is connected to everyone and everything through very refined (Feinstoffliche) 'energies' or emanations, one is able to connect and communicate with everyone and everything. That is part of shamanism.

    That is why remote healing works as well as curses, or manipulations.

    Therefore it is necessary to have a sound set of ethics and morals. Otherwise you are consumed/enslaved by certain spirits.

    And therefore I am more interested in what our ancestors have to teach about this aspect, not so much about cultural elements.
    weel nich will dieken dej mot wieken

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ocko View Post
    That is why remote healing works as well as curses, or manipulations.
    You have really no idea, you truly can't imagine how many people I have already cursed in my life -- and how many more I would like to -- yet them idiots are still alive n kickin, and grinning into my face.

    And no, remote healing does not work. I have seen my one grandfather, my one grandmother, my mother and my father dying, and I could not heal them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nigel Pennick View Post
    Shamanry gives direct access to other-worldly states of being that cannot be reached in normal consciousness. To gain access to this otherworld, shamans undergo self-destructive processes.
    Yeah, and this is what drugs do, and what our "white" junkies do.

    If someone wants to destroy his own body by himself, "shamanism" seems to be a fast & effective way.

    But you know: it is not needed anymore, because we are already flooded by drugs.

    Our bodies get destroyed by the alien flood from without, and by the drug flood from within.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nigel Pennick View Post
    The word “shaman” comes from the Tungus of Siberia, and means “exalted” or “excited.”
    The Tungus are the ancestors of the Huns. The Huns did great harm to Germanic people, destroying and removing their Lebensraum, and almost exterminating them, forcing them to "migrate" west, and so on.

    The Huns/Tungus did the same to the Gemanics in the 4th century, as what the Mongols did in the 13th, and the bolsheviks in the 20th.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nigel Pennick View Post
    In the Norse pantheon, Odin is the god of magic, poetry, divination, and inspiration, qualities that, in ancient societies, were possessed by shamans.
    In the "Norse" pantheon, but not in the Germanic. Odin/Wotan was originally not the highest God, which was instead Tyr/Tiwaz.

    Tiwaz was the God of law & order, not of the junkies, rowdies and rascals.

    Significantly, Wotan/Odin only became the highest Germanic god during the "age of migration", that it to say: after the Germanics came in direct contact, that is, after they came in close combat with the "Tungus", and were heavily alterated, and deeply traumatized by that "experience".
    Quote Originally Posted by Nigel Pennick View Post
    Neurophysiologists have discovered what they call “phosphenes,” geometrical shapes and images in the brain’s visual cortex and neural system.
    Yeah, and an acquaintance of mine, a nurse working in a mental hospital, recently told me -- I did not know that -- that the intake of drugs cause holes in the brain. The junkies get repeatedly x-rayed, and on the x-ray photograph series one can see the brain holes getting bigger.

    Before I was told this, I always believed that drugs somehow "disturb" the brain, maybe "damage" the "structure" of the brain. But it's not like that. Nay, the drugs literally dissolve the brain, turn it into thin air, until the skull of the yeah so cool, so "experienced" trip-goer is HOLLOW.

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