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Thread: Greedy Fat Cats Ruining Our Quality of Life

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    Greedy Fat Cats Ruining Our Quality of Life

    There is no denying immigration brings economic benefits, particularly if there are a high proportion of skilled migrants. Research shows that skilled migration does increase the well being of Australians; that is, boosts GNP per capita.

    But the benefits are surprisingly, and disappointingly, small. This has also been found overseas. Harvard immigration economist George Borjas said the debate over immigration actually shouldn’t be about the economic benefits to a nation, as they "seem much too small". In the UK, a recent House of Lords Select Committee on Economic Affairs report, The Economic Impact of Immigration, found the economic benefits of immigration were 'small or insignificant'.

    According to Borjas, the debate over immigration numbers should be about winners and losers: "In the short run, it transfers wealth from one group (workers) to another (employers)."

    The main mechanism through which the economy benefits from immigration is the lowering of wages by increasing the supply of workers. (While people focus on the impact on low-wage workers, a program with a high proportion of skilled workers will also keep down wages for a nation's existing skilled workforce). Some argue immigration doesn't lower wages, but if wages aren't lowered, then there is probably little economic benefit from immigration.


    So it keeps our wages lower, increases property value making it very tough for first home buyers, ensures future skills shortages as it avoids us spending extra on training our own, places increased burdens on infrastructure (costing the taxpayer for new hospitals, roads etc), increases pollution like carbon emissions (costing the taxpayer to try and reduce it). To me it seems big business is the only ones winning out (namely the fat cats in control of them) while the quality of life is lowered per capita.

    It is primarily big business (the very ones who provide substantial funds to the major parties) who will benefit most from mass immigration, especially as small business is often run by families.

    96% of all business in Australia is small business

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    So, even official sources are now claiming that the economic benefits of immigration are “disppointingly small” (read: negative!) but isn’t it typical of them to focus purely on the financial arguments and totally neglect the cultural issues.

    Perhaps it’s because these one-dimensional “experts” can only play with numbers that we get such important factors being ignored or – more likely – it’s the fact that they don’t have to live amongst the immigrants!

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