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Thread: The Great Native-Americans Were Here First Hoax

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    The Great Native-Americans Were Here First Hoax

    The Smithsonian was founded in 1836 by the bequest of one James Smithson, a wealthy English scientist who left a princely sum of $500,000 "to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.



    Statue of James Smithson, surrounded by Smithsonian Scholars and behind them the Smithsonian Castle.


    Though the institution initially fulfilled Smithson's mandate, after a few decades of growth and sound management, creeping bureaucracy set in, and the museum's lofty goals began to outstrip its ability to properly manage its assets. Furthermore, the decision of one man, Smithsonian executive John Wesley Powell, set in motion a series of events that led to a historical and archaeological disaster of a magnitude so great that it is difficult to fully comprehend.

    Powell had lived among the Native Americans, and had become sensitive to their plight. As a result, when the time came for the museum to organize its strategy for systematically analyzing and cataloging all of the information that was to be found in the New World, the decision was made to take an isolationist approach, rather than a cultural diffusionist approach. The isolationist approach posited that the ethnically Asiatic Native Americans that met Columbus and the Pilgrims were the same peoples who had populated the continent since the beginning of human history, and that there had been no other contact between them and any other non-Asiatic peoples whatsoever, period. However, though it appears that the Asiatics had indeed dominated the Americas for thousands of years, new evidence, previously suppressed, appears to show that there was indeed interaction with other cultures that had immigrated to the New World in prehistoric times. This approach, the "cultural diffusionist" approach, is the new paradigm in ancient historical studies, and helps explains the existence of giant, blond and red-headed skeletons throughout the Americas.

    As a result of Powell's decision to reject any and all evidence that might contradict his prefabricated theory that early America had not been visited by any European, African, Middle-Eastern, or any other non-Asiatic, non-Native peoples, voluminous amounts of irreplaceable historical data were lost, miscategorized, or "misplaced". As Hamilton explains, "Armed with a self-created doctrine powered by ample funding, and with a little help later from the one-way door to the Smithsonian's inaccessible catacombs, the years that followed saw Powell and his underling nearly succeed in the obliteration of the last notions of the legendary, mysterious, and antique class of mound building people, and for that matter, any people that didn't fit into the mold of his theory. Did Powell intentionally overlook some of the archaeology so as to focus on his own special agenda?"

    This poor decision then led to a wholesale plunder of mounds, caves, and anything else Powell and his cronies could get their hands on. And in the process, anything that fit into their narrow paradigm of American history was kept, while everything that did not, met an ignominious end. So much devastation was wrought by this man's poor decision and concomitant mismanagement, overloading Smithsonian storage with an impossibly large amount of miscategorized artifacts, that even today the Smithsonian has not fully cataloged everything. Worse, as a result of this decision, our understanding of America's ancient history in general has been woefully inadequate at best, and at worst, just plain wrong. Powell and Co. likely did not purposely destroy data, though some of the precious evidence of America's gigantic past may have been lost or destroyed in transit. The real problem lay in the fact that these countless crates of precious truth are lost in the massive, almost legendary "Smithsonian Warehouse", guarded by both security guards and security by obscurity. And as the multiplicity of filing systems in use in the Smithsonian can best be described as byzantine, it is likely that they will stay there for some time. As Cooke explains:

    • Rumored to be beneath the Vatican lie many levels of secret, impregnable vaults that make up the legendary Vatican Archives. Supposedly containing the plunder of millennia and the secrets of the ages, their contents have filled the imaginations of countless generations. Perhaps not equal in quality, but certainly rivaling in quantity, are the archives of the Smithsonian Institution. And in those archives, open only to government officials, lie the bones of many thousands of corpses dug up, described and stored without study, many for over a century and a half. Scores, if not hundreds, of these skeletons are considered giants and yet, they lie deteriorating, not finding the slightest interest from anthropologists. Wanting no part in rocking the neatly defined, religiously correct American prehistory model, the researchers ignore them now and there is no sign this will ever change. Hidden in dark, inaccessible storage is a sad example of scientific domination over social understanding and cultural history. Not to be found in the history books, the science references or the classroom is undeniable evidence that a race of giants had a prominent presence on the North American continent. Also hidden from public understanding is the fact that giants were among the native people who fell before the colonial eradication crusade. Only the fortunate cultural conscience of amateur historians, writing about the prominent events of their individual communities, preserved easily accessible evidence of giants in our North American past. Though there is much evidence in the written record of the Smithsonian it is an overwhelming and disorganized system typical of a rapid and misguided mass internment project.... All evidence, showing anything not fitting a Stone Age culture better eliminated than trifled with or indicating anything that might warrant serious study, was quietly filed away and warehoused in obscurity.


    Though most of the ancient tombs of the giants have been plundered and effectively lost, much historical data still exists regarding the existence of giants, due to the numerous written accounts left behind by our pioneer ancestors. These stories paint a picture of ancient America that is very different than that told in the standard history books. First, however, let us go over in detail the specific characteristics of the giants as evidenced by the North American finds, combine them with parallel references to giants of the ancient Near East and related regions, and then attempt to formulate a theory as to how they came to the Americas.

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    There has been some speculation, that contrary to popular belief, that the North & South American continents had been populated by a very large number of different ethnic groups long before Columbus.

    Native American History
    Pre-European Period

    Everything was water except a very small piece of ground. On this were the eagle and the coyote. Then the turtle swam to them. They sent it to dive for the earth at the bottom of the water. The turtle barely succeeded in reaching the bottom and touching it with its foot. When it came up again, all the earth seemed washed out. Coyote looked closely at its nails. At last he found a grain of earth. Then he and the eagle took this and laid it down. From it they made the earth as large as it is. From the earth they also made six men and six women. They sent these out in pairs in different directions and the people separated. After a time the eagle sent the coyote to see what the people were doing. Coyote came back and said: "They are doing something bad. They are eating the earth. One side is already gone." The eagle said: " That is bad. Let us make something for them to eat. Let us send the dove to find something." The dove went out. It found a single grain of meal. The eagle and coyote put this down on the ground. Then the earth became covered with seeds and fruit. Now they told the people to eat these. When the seeds were dry and ripe the people gathered them. Then the people increased and spread all over. But the water is still under the world.


    All humans are interested in their origins and try to account for their existence through creation stories, like the one quoted above which is told by the Yaudanchi (a Yokut-speaking Nation living in the south-central San Joaquin Valley of California). Every native North American society has such stories recounting the actions and deeds of "power" in the past. They commonly explain how people came to live where they do, how they acquired tools and customs, and why one should act, or not act, in certain ways. Most commonly they contain fundamental conceptions of nature, society, and how people ought to relate to the world and to one another.

    Like North America's Native People, anthropologists and archaeologists also have creation stories which explain how America's native peoples came to be, though their stories differ markedly from those of most of the Native People. It's not a better story, just a different one. The short, and until a few years ago the standard textbook, version goes like this (for a longer version, click herehttp://www.cabrillo.edu/~crsmith/ant...1.html#periods).

    Like North America's Native People, anthropologists and archaeologists also have creation stories which explain how America's native peoples came to be, though their stories differ markedly from those of most of the Native People. It's not a better story, just a different one. The short, and until a few years ago the standard textbook, version goes like this (for a longer version, click here):

    Humans first evolved in Africa some 4 - 5 million years ago. Over the next 4 million years, through the interplay of evolution and adaptation, survival and extinction, many species of humans evolved. By about 100,000 - 120,000 years ago, people physically like modern humans had evolved in Africa and sometime around 100,000 years ago some of them migrated out into the rest of the world, reaching central and eastern Asia by at least 40,000 to 50,000 years ago. And it was from these "out-of-Africa" populations that the first immigrants into the Americans came, reaching North America about 12,000 years ago by means of a "land bridge" between Asia and North America.

    The "land bridge" existed because at various times during the Pleistocene (Ice Ages), vast continental glaciers (in places up to two miles thick) formed over much of the northern half of North America. Each time the glacial masses reached their maximum extent (drawing massive amounts of water out of the ocean and causing a consequent lowering of sea levels worldwide), Alaska and northeastern Siberia were joined by a broad "land bridge" which formed part of a province geologists call Beringia. This land bridge appeared (and disappeared) several times during the Pleistocene (Ice Ages): from about 75,000 to 45,000 years ago, and again from about 25,000 to around 14,000 years ago, when the land bridge was exposed for the last time. And it was during this last emergence that high latitude living nomadic big-game hunters in Northeast Asia crossed into the Americas by way of the "land bridge." These pioneers lived in small bands, hunting large and medium sized game animals such as mammoth, musk ox, and bison which provided them with food, their hides a source of shelter and clothing, and their dung perhaps used in place of firewood.
    This map is a looping GIF animation depicting the retreat of glaciers in North America - beginning about 18,000 years ago. If your browser supports animated images, you will see the glacial extent changing on the map. If your browser doesn't support animation, you can view the animation by clicking here.



    NOTE: This looping GIF animation was created by the Illinois State Museum and can be found on their website


    However, once in Alaska, these big game hunters were blocked from going south or east by the presence of the glaciers, in some places up to two miles thick and stretching from the Atlantic coast to the mountain ranges of Alaska and British Columbia (but not quite all the way to the Pacific coast), and from the southern shores of the Great Lakes to the north polar regions. Then around 12,000 years ago the glaciers began to disappear and an "ice- free" corridor appeared between the receding glaciers of Alaska and British Columbia and those lying eastward in Canada, and opening the door to the Americas for the very first time (so the story went) in human history. And it was by means of this corridor that the hardy Siberian-cum-American pioneers made their way to the south, reaching the Great Plains of North America some 11,400 years ago.

    Once the pioneers had traversed the "ice-free" corridor, they fanned out in many directions: some groups moved into the Eastern U.S.; others contined southward into northern Mexcio; while still other groups moved into the Great Basin and Southwestern regions of the U.S. In so doing they became the First Americans, or as the archaeologists call them, the Paleo-Indians, and have been regarded as THE ancestral populations to all of today's Native Americans.

    The earliest, and best-known, of these "founders" are called the Clovis people, named after a site in New Mexico where, in the 1930s, large, bifacially flaked stone spear points were found in direct association with mammoth bones (in some instances actually embedded in the rib bones on the mammoths). Clovis hunters left their stone points and butchered animal bones at kill sites scattered across much of North America. When radiocarbon dating was introduced in the 1950s, Clovis sites were shown to range in age from about 11,000 to 11,400 years old - several thousands of years older than any other sites in the Americas (at least that was the thought then), just shortly after the corridor had opened up.

    Everything seemed to fit quite nicely: no people in the Americas before 12,000 years ago (because of the ice sheets), the opening of an ice-free corridor beginning around 12,000 years ago, and the "sudden" appearance of Clovis at about 11,400 years ago, and their seemingly rapid spread over much of North America. Thus Clovis were the First Americans.

    A simple, persuasive, once might even say seductive, story - several small bands of nomadic big-game hunters from Siberia colonizing a virgin land and over thousands of years their descendants would spread to every corner of the Americas and give rise to most of the native people in the Americas today. This was (and for many archaeologists it still IS) the gospel of American archaeology.

    BUT .... it now seems that this scenario is much too simple. All across the Americas, archaeologists and anthropologists, along with geneticists, linguists, geologists, and some of America's native peoples, are assembling new data, reassessing older data, and generating new models that call into question both the single genetic and cultural origin model as well as the Clovis First model. And the answers now emerging to the questions of who were the First Americans, from where did they come, how did they get to the Americas, when did they arrive in the Americas, and what were their lifeways during initial colonization are very different from those of just a few years ago and suggest a picture very different from the standard textbook story of Who the First Americans were.

    WHO were the FIRST Americans?

    The accumulating skeletal and genetic evidence suggests that the earliest populations to move into the Americas were not Asians whose primary genetic background was that of residents of northeastern Asia and eastern Mongolia (the old view). At the end of 1999 scientists meet in California and New Mexico to mull over the implications of recently discovered or restudied ancient American skeletons, most of which date between 8,600 and 11,000 years ago. And what they discovered has shaken the foundations of the anthropological communities. Instead of resembling the historically known American Indians, the wide range of skull shapes which have come to light so far display affinities with populations as diverse as the Ainu of Japan, peoples of central Asia, Australasia, India, southwest Asia, even the Neandertals of Europe (see Ancestors of the New World Had Multiple Origins for more information about the possible Neandertal connection). Genetic evidence also supports the idea of multiple migrations of people coming from distinctly different genetic poplations: perhaps as many as four or five different genetic populations. For an idea of what some of these earliest Americans may have looked like, go here.

    HOW did they GET TO the Americas?
    While some populations, perhaps the genetic and cultural forbears of the Clovis people, walked across the "land bridge" and down the ice-free corridor in western Canada, some theorists are beginning to consider the possibility that people migrated to the Americas by walking or boating along the now submerged Beringia and the continental shelves of North, Central, and South America. While older ideas stressed that the late Ice-Age glaciers extended down and into the Pacific ocean, newer studies have shown that this was not the case. Indeed, even our ideas about the environment of the entire "land bridge" have changed markedly in the last several decades. Perhaps the "ice-free" corridor was along the Pacific coast of the Americas, which would help explain why some of the oldest sites in the Americas are in South, not North America. Other scientists have proposed a migration of boat people from Europe, basing their hypothesis on what they perceive as shared technologies and tool types between Clovis and Solutrean people who lived in France around 18,000 years ago. Presumably, European boat people would have used much the same route that the Norse (Vikings) did thousands or years later (around 1,100 years ago), when they settled in Iceland, Greenland, Newfoundland, and the northeastern U.S.
    WHEN did they ARRIVE?
    Archaeological evidence suggests that people were already living in the Americas well before the initial appearance of Clovis. For example, people were living at a site called Monte Verde (in Chile) at least 12,500 years ago (and perhaps as much as 30,000-plus years ago). AT some point after the inhabitants left the site, rising creek waters covered the site, laying down a deposit of peat which preserved a wide range of items: animal bones, wood planks, stakes, and animals used to cover rectangular shaped living structures, fireplace ash, a human footprint, and the remains of over 70 kinds of edible plants. At Meadowcroft Rock Shelter, in western Pennsylvannia, there is evidence of nearly continuous human occupation from the Iroquoian Seneca of the early centuries of English and American occupation all the way back to Clovis and beyond. The site's excavator, Dr. James Adovasio, claims he has human-made fire pits dating to more than 14,000 years ago, with indications of some being as old as 17,000 years.A battery of radiocarbon dates puts people at this creekside campsite in south-central Chile around 12,500 years ago.

    WHAT were their LIFEWAYS.
    Varied and diverse subsistence practices (and by extension, varied and diverse technologies and tools). If the Clovis people (and their immediate genetic and cultural ancestors) came through an "ice-free corridor" and emerged onto the great plains of North America, their subsistence in all probability centered on the taking of mega-fauna, supplimented by familiar plant foods. For those folks who entered the Americas along the Pacific coast, either on foot or by coastal boating, food resources would have run the gamut from shellfish to fish to birds and birds' eggs to sea mammals, plus those plant species which were widely distributed along the coast and with which the pioneering people were well familiar.

    Subdivisions of Native American History - the Pre-European Period

    Archaeologists divide North America's past into a number of time periods, both to emphasize features share by cultures at one time as well as highlight their differences from cultures of other times. Unfortunately, there's little agreement on how best to divide the past that is useful and/or consistent across native North America. The one used here divides the period before the coming of the Europeans and Ameropeans (American born descendants of European settlers) into three major time periods: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, and the Formative.

    The Paleo-Indian period covers that span of time during which people first came into the Americas. Since there is great controversy surrounding exactly when the first people came to the Americas, no fixed starting point for the Paleo-Indian periods be can be given. Some scientists say humans came into the Americas no earlier than 13,000 years ago, while other scientists believe that people were living in the Americas long before 13,000 years ago. Also, the origin tales of many of the Native American societies state that they were created in essentially those geographical locations where they were when first encountered by Europeans; thus, the Indians have always been in the Americas. The Paleo-Indian period ends with the major climatic changes (and accompaning flora and faunal changes) brought about by the end of the Pleistocene (Ice Ages), some 10,000 years ago.

    The Archaic period is an outgrowth of the Paleo-Indian period and spans the time from the end of the Pleistocene until about 4,000 to 5,000 years ago. It was during this time that the Paleo-Indians spread out across the Americas, moving into every habitable portion of the continents, adjusting and adapting to regional extremes of temperature and climate, to the mountains and valleys, lush woodlands and dry deserts, verdant prairies and arid tundra, coastal marshlands and inland lakes. Over time, increasingly varied Indian cultures evolved so that by the end of the Archaic, North America was a veritable patchwork of differing cultures, languages, and societies.

    The end of the Archaic is difficult to fix. As early as 4,000 to 5,000 years ago, societies in many places in North America began to do things differently: moving away from mainly egalitarian social systems to extremely complex, often highly stratified, soci-political systems; shifting from nomadic to sedendtary settlement patterns and living in large, permanent villages and towns; experimenting with a variety of indigenous North American plants, some of which would be domesticated in the following period; engaging in a wide range of environmental management practices, including the use of fire; manufacturing pottery; engaging in long distance trade. On the other hand, many archaic period societies maintained an archaic way of life until less than 100 years ago.

    Complete Article:http://www.cabrillo.edu/~crsmith/anth7_hist1.html
    The legend of Prince Madoc and the Welsh Indians is a remarkable story of a brave, resourceful and intelligent people and the footprints they left in the New World - a story that can grip the beholder with intrigue and emotion. Archaeological finds in the Southern states as well as in the Ohio Valley include the remains of highly engineered stone forts, metal implements and other artifacts impossible to explain in the context of the savage tribes encountered by the Europeans and Americans who eventually settled the region. Did the Welsh leave them?

    In 12th century Wales, the terror and turmoil brought about by the contention for the throne caused an exodus of the frightened and disillusioned populace. The songs of medieval bards suggest that Prince Madoc, drawing on the seafaring knowledge of his Viking forebears, led some three expeditions westward, across the seas, to seek a new life in a land that could hardly be less hospitable than home. Legends of the Toltecs and Aztecs relate that ships full of tall blond men visited the Americas in this time period; needless to say, they were taken to be gods of the seas.

    After visiting Mexico, Madoc is believed to have sailed to the north side of the Gulf, where he founded a colony in Mobile Bay in 1170, and another at the mouth of the Mississippi. Over time, both groups were forced by warring Indians to move on, with the first group traversing Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. Wars with the Cherokee forced them out of Tennessee in about 1500, and in a great migration they found their way to the banks of the Upper Missouri River, where they became known as the Mandan Indians. The second group travelled up the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers to the Falls of the Ohio, where they established a well-defended colony; but wars with the Shawnee and Iroquois tribes eventually spelled their downfall.

    Complete Article:http://www.algora.com/88/book/details.html
    1929: French Claim Discovery
    Claims that French fishermen discovered American a century before Columbus landed in the West Indies were made in New York April 29, 1929 by Meade Minnigerode, author of "Certain Rich Men" and other historical books containing original research material, who returned from France after several months of delving into old documents. "In the course of research," Mr. Minnigerode said, "I encountered indubitable evidence that French fishermen hunted whale and netted cod off Newfoundland as early as 1392, just a century before Columbus discovered America. The French may have been earlier even than that, but as far as documentary evidence is concerned they were on the fringe of the United States before the end of the 14th century." The author explaining that he found his records in the church tax lists of a little village on the coast of Brittany, which revealed further that there was great rivalry over the possession of the new fishing ground. The Bretons apparently successfully kept their secret, but the records showed that the fish wherewith the money was obtained to pay taxes, were caught off Newfoundland.

    Complete Article:http://www.algora.com/88/book/details.html

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    The Hoax of the 19th Century.

    Rassenhygieniker/frippardthree: Anyone who has bothered to visit the various, so-called "native american" tribes or groups in person and actually
    observe them first hand will quickly realize that nether "Isolationism" nor
    the "Land Bridge" Theory can be true.
    The different groups scattered across the Americas, east to west, north
    to south, vary radically in body habitus, facial structure, hight, culture,
    technology, and intelligence among other things. There is no way in hell
    that they all could be from a common genetic lineage.

    Of course, the proof of Diffusionism was discovered years ago and is still
    "hanging in plain sight" so to speak. In the Mayan ruins in Central
    America are a number of murals on the walls clearly showing "white"
    people dressed in middle eastern style clothes.

    I mean, what do the bloody "mainstream" archeologists need, a photograph?
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