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Thread: Eye Fatigue

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    Eye Fatigue

    For the past few weeks I have been having trouble with my eyes.
    Has anyone else here experienced the following symptoms?:

    Redness of the eyes
    Trouble focusing
    Slight rainbow halos around light sources
    Lights seem abnormally bright
    Extreme dryness of the eyes
    Persistent feeling of tiredness

    I have only used a computer for a few years now so I am not experienced enough to understand how personal health relates to its usage.
    Does anybody here use computer glasses? I have seriously considered wearing sunshades!
    If someone has thoughts on this I would greatly appreciate any advice.

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    Nobody has experienced any of the above?
    For those who were too shy to answer, I have compiled here some information that I hope you will find useful.

    According to what I found a few of the symptoms mentioned in my first post may be a sign of glaucoma, particularly rainbow halos.
    Excessive computer use can make this condition even worse.
    I recently had my eyes checked and the doctor could find no indication that I have this disease.

    At school I am pretty much in front of a computer all day, then I go home and repeat the same pattern for an additional few hours. To help alleviate these symptoms my doctor prescribed for me a pair of reading/computer glasses. These are not for long distance viewing, such as driving a car, but more for focusing in on closer objects, like a book or computer screen.
    To further help give my eyes some relief I opted to have them tinted as well as covered with an anti-reflective coating. I have also lowered the brightness level on my computer screen. Remember to have a light source at your back while using, and never sit in a completely darkened room.

    Even with all of the above precautions the one thing I found out that was most important was that I teach myself to blink while using a computer.

    It is estimated that people blink 22 times a minute.

    Thus, it can be calculated that people blink 960 times in one hour; 15,360 times in a 16-hour day (because we sleep, of course); 108,220 times in a week; 460,800 times in a 30-day month; and therefore about 8,000,000 times in a year spanning 365 days (give or take a few thousand blinks because I'm sure you won't be awake for exactly the same amount of time every day of the year).
    Many people sit staring at a computer screen and will blink their eyes only a few times per hour! It is almost as if they are in some kind of trance.
    Blinking keeps the eyes lubricated. If you fail to do so then you risk such things as strained, red, dry, tired eyes, as well as seeing halos.
    I have resolved to teach myself to blink while using a computer at least once every five seconds. Perhaps through repetition I will eventually not have to think about doing it at all.

    I have been giving myself five minute breaks on the hour. I turn the chair away from the computer and close my eyes and rest them. If needed I have also bought a bottle of very good eye-drops. (I use Systane)
    Also, if I have to stop and think about something before I type or draw it then I will also close my eyes for the duration, since I found that I continued to just stare at the screen while deep in thought. After about three hours I will get up and go outside for a walk, and give my eyes a chance to work other ways. Here is an interesting article I found on this:

    On the third of January, 1907, at the early age of 49, there passed away an optician by the name of Aristide Antoine Marie Fournet. This man of genius was the first to grasp the consequences of our modern age - that primitive man, before he became a farmer, used his eyes mainly for distant seeing, using his eyes for near seeing only occasionally and for short periods. The mode and requirements of seeing for mankind have changed since men became farmers, weavers, tool makers and readers of books. Man now uses his eyes more and more for prolonged near seeing and little or not at all for distant seeing.

    Our eyes do not just see, they work to see. Seeing is to our eyes as walking is to our legs. A proper amount of walking is necessary and will do us good. A small proportion of fast walking or running will do us no harm. But too much fast walking or running will tire not only our legs but our whole body. The same is true for our eyes. Distant seeing, where our eyes are relaxed, is like walking. Nearer seeing is like fast walking. Very close seeing is like running; it will tire and affect not only our eyes but our entire body. Prolonged and intensive near seeing is eyestrain; it is not good for our eyes and it is not good for our health.

    Conventional optometric care has totally ignored eyestrain and has sought only the correction of visual defects, that being the prescription of glasses for the attainment of good distance vision and the assumption that eyes with good distance vision are perfect and that perfect eyes need no assistance for prolonged and intensive near seeing. They would give eyestrain the credit for no more than the occasional "red eye". This is a very harmful and wide-spread fallacy. It is this eyestrain which wears out our eyes, causes blindness, nervous disorders, headaches, learning disabilities and general bodily malaise.
    ADDITIONAL
    If you are planning to have you eyes dilated in future then you may want to read this article first:

    TOXIC DILATING DRUGS

    Cycloplegics such as atropine are drugs that paralyze the ciliary muscle temporarily and also cause the pupil to dilate. Mydriatics are drugs that just dilate the pupil. The use of both drugs has become commonplace even in routine eye examinations. You are then expected to wear sunglasses for several hours after the examination in order to protect the eyes from sunlight damage. At one time, only ophthalmologists used these drugs, claiming that a more accurate determination of the actual refraction could be obtained. The drugs were greatly overused, because in so doing the doctor could convince the customer that a more thorough examination was being performed and a higher price could be charged. This was done even though optometrists, who could not use the drugs, got along quite well without drugging the customer. A second reason was that this appeared to set them on a higher level than optometrists. Since then, the optometrists have fought a state-by-state battle, against the furious opposition of the MDs, to be allowed to use the drugs, so that now even optometrists are playing doctor by using them unnecessarily.

    The truth of the matter is that an eye in a drugged condition is an abnormal eye bearing little resemblance to the normal eye. It is difficult to find any benefit to be derived in prescribing glasses based on the examination of an abnormal eye. These drugs often cause irritation or a burning sensation to the eyes and can cause systemic poisoning and even death. In addition, the drugs have a tendency to raise the intraocular pressure in some individuals and can precipitate an attack of glaucoma. Numerous children develop flushed faces when these drugs are used - a sure sign that the body is being poisoned. The only legitimate use of these drugs is to get a better view of the interior of the eye when eye disease is suspected. And now, even that is no longer necessary, since a device called a scanning laser ophthalmoscope is available to examine the retina without dilating the pupil. Ask your eye doctor about it.

    The doctors, of course, would have us believe that these drugs are harmless. Yet, when it serves their own interest, they tell another story. When House Bill 63 in the state of Delaware was being discussed, organized ophthalmology placed an advertisement in a Delaware newspaper that said, "If passed, HB 63 will permit optometrists to use potentially dangerous drugs to diagnose eye disease. Optometrists are not properly trained in the use of drugs nor in the treatment of their side effects. Serious side effects of these drugs include convulsions, high blood pressure, shock, asthma, retinal detachment, cataracts, glaucoma, and more."

    On February 7, 2000, the following message was posted to the Ophthalmology Discussion Group of the allexperts.com website: "My grandmother went blind about five years ago, she simply went to bed one night and the next morning had no vision. Before this event she had never had any problems with her eyesight other than having to wear glasses. Her doctors have told her that the nerves in her eyes are still alive. If it helps, the day before she went blind she had her eyes dilated by her eye doctor. My question is, is there a medical procedure that might help her get any part of her vision back? Also, do you recommend any doctor or vision center she could go to that might help her further?" Having read this tragic message, do you really want to risk using these drugs?

    One person who worked for an eye doctor has stated:

    Dilation drops cause the eyes to not be able to accommodate naturally. That is why many doctors use them. It always results in a higher prescription. I actually got to prescribe eyeglasses and know this for a fact. Most patients reported headaches when they received a prescription that was written while their eyes were dilated. They would return and the result was always a weaker prescription.

    Studies have relealed that refraction with cycloplegia is LESS accurate than without, and that you are just as likely to get an overcorrection as an undercorrection. When an overcorrection results, it may be due to the "reverse pinhole effect." That is, the dilation of the pupil brings into play the periphery of the lens. That area may have a greater myopic refraction than the central part of the lens, although it is little used during normal life. Basing the prescription on that reading results in an overcorrection during normal use of the eyes. And the result of that is rampant myopia.

    First Article:

    Roy H. Rengstorff, "Observed effects of cycloplegia on refractive findings", Journal of the American Optometric Association, Vol. 37, vol. 4, p. 360 (1966).

    The function of accommodation is not completely suspended by a cycloplegic agent, and varying degrees of residual accommodation through a cycloplegic examination has often led to a conclusion that cycloplegics decrease the effective dioptric power of the crystalline lens and consequently reveal increased hypermetropia. Although this is true when one uncovers a latent hypermetropic patient, there is little evidence to suport this occurrence with other types of ametropia, particlularly myopia. This has prompted a study to determine, "Does a cycloplegic consistently reveal increased hypermetropia or less myopia?"

    Summary: the results failed to show cycloplegics consistently revealing increased hypermetropia or less myopia. The mean effect was approximately no change; one-third increasing -0.36 D., one third exhibiting no significant change, and one third increasing +0.37 D.

    Second article:

    William M. Ludlam, Stephen S. Weinberg, Chester J. Twarowski, and Diana P. Ludlam, "Comparison of cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic ocular component measurement in children," American Journal of Optometry and Archives of American Academy of Optometry, Vol. 49, no. 10 (October, 1972). College of Optometry, State University of New York, New York, New York.

    A comparison of five independent measurements of the ocular dioptric components utilizing both ultrasonic and photographic phakometric techniques was made on both eyes of twenty children under the first non-cycloplegic and then one hour later, cycloplegic conditions. the variances for both the phakometric and ultrasonic measurements made under cycloplegia were not significantly different from those made in the undrugged state. Thus, the hypothesized improvement in reliability accomplished through the use of cycloplegia was not found experimentally. Both right and left eye ocular component values determined in the non-cycloplegic state were shown to have significantly higher validity than those for the cycloplegic state.

    Therefore, the use of dangerous dilating drugs has no place in a routine eye exam. During their education, eye doctors are indoctrinated in the overuse of these drugs due to the influence of the industries they serve, the drug companies and optical companies that produce and sell the drugs. Putting drugs in everyone's eyes is like putting toxic fluoride in everyone's drinking water. It's great for business but harmful to the public. If you do not want drugs used in a routine eye examination, look your doctor in the eye and say so. It's your money and your health.

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    Yeah, I've had most of those symptoms. My eye problems were cause by graft versus host disease, though. I have/did have extreme dryness of the eyes, halos around light sources (at night), trouble focusing in dim/dull environments. Prior to that I had a series of haemorrhages in my retina that caused a number of small blind spots, some of which healed, some of which didn't. However, that was caused by a blood deficiency and not GVH disease.

    One thing that originally resulted from extreme dryness of the eyes was double vision, even triple vision. The eyeball was so dry that its surface became rough and refracted light.

    My doc's solution was to prescribe me special eye drops actually made from my own blood. It actually helps a lot. In fact, it helped so much I rarely even need to use it anymore. On a sunny day, my vision is 20/20. On a dull day, my visions slightly worse, presumably because my eyes need to be stimulated by light to work at their full potential.

    But I doubt GVHD is the cause of your problems (unless you've had a transplant). Maybe you should get your doctor to prescribe eye-drops/ointment for a while.

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    Is there no one else here who can relate to ANY of the symptoms described here?
    I would be very interested to know of the various ways that other people deal with such things as extremely dry eyes.
    I use an expensive brand of eye lubricant (Systane, and now also, Optive, both recommended by my eye doctor) but neither seem to work very well.
    Six rep points to the first person that can provide helpful information.

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    I have a deformed lens and according to optometrist this can lead to eyestrain, I should use prescription glasses but as I don't suffer any effect from long-term PC use I don't.

    You can consider looking into your monitors resolution, brightness, vividness etc. even glare on the monitor can cause your eyes to strain. I am no doctor but that is what I would look into first if medical consultation has had no effect.

    Irritated eyes may be for some other environmental reason and it could be that it effects you more acutely while using your PC.
    Although the word "Commando" was wrongly used to describe all Boer soldiers, a commando was a unit formed from a particular district. None of the units was organized in regular companies, battalions or squadrons. The Boer commandos were individualists who were difficult to control, resented formal discipline or orders, and earned a British jibe that"every Boer was his own general".

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    Maybe this program will help, it worked for me: http://www.stereopsis.com/flux/

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    Info about f.lux if anyone is interested:

    Ever notice how people texting at night have that eerie blue glow?

    Or wake up ready to write down the Next Great Idea, and get blinded by your computer screen?

    During the day, computer screens look good—they're designed to look like the sun. But, at 9PM, 10PM, or 3AM, you probably shouldn't be looking at the sun.
    f.lux

    F.lux fixes this: it makes the color of your computer's display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day.

    It's even possible that you're staying up too late because of your computer. You could use f.lux because it makes you sleep better, or you could just use it just because it makes your computer look better.

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    Staring At Computers May Cause Glaucoma

    By Charles Arthur Technology Editor

    Tuesday, 16 November 2004

    Spending hours staring at a computer screen may raise the risk of glaucoma, a progressive eye disease that can lead to blindness, scientists believe.

    Spending hours staring at a computer screen may raise the risk of glaucoma, a progressive eye disease that can lead to blindness, scientists believe.

    The dramatic discovery contradicts years of advice which suggested that gazing at computers did not damage the optic nerve. Researchers aim to replicate the study to confirm the findings.

    The results emerged from a study in Japan of 10,000 workers with an average age of 43. It found a statistical link between heavy computer use and eye problems that presage glaucoma. The problems were more common among staff with existing vision defects such as short-sight or long-sight.

    The team warned that there could be a dramatic rise in the number of glaucoma cases, or patients showing the early signs, if action was not taken to check people who spend long time in front of screens and have existing eye conditions.

    "Computer stress is reaching higher levels than have ever been experienced before," the team from the Toho University School of Medicine in Tokyo said. "In the next decade, therefore, it might be important for public health professionals to show more concern about myopia [short-sightedness] and visual field abnormalities in heavy computer users." Visual field abnormalities are distortions or gaps in the field of view.

    "Myopic workers with a history of long-term computer using might have an increased risk of visual field abnormalities, possibly related to glaucoma," said Dr Masayuki Tatemichi, who led the team. The work was reported in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

    Glaucoma is more common in old age, and happens when the optic nerve in the eye is damaged, possibly by high pressure inside the eye. The causes are unknown, but potential risk factors include smoking and high blood pressure.

    Opticians had discounted the possibility that computer use could be linked to glaucoma and several studies had suggested that there was no connection between intensive computer use and glaucoma. Although poor computer screens can cause eye strain, that was not believed to be a precursor to the problem.

    For male office workers, the work is a second alarm bell over glaucoma; last year a study suggested wearing a tie too tightly could also lead to the disorder.

    The investigation by the Toho University researchers found that 522, or 5.1 per cent, of the workers had "visual field abnormalities", which can be a precursor to the full-blown condition - which normally affects 0.74 per cent of the population. Further tests on the 522 subjects found that 165 (32 per cent) had suspected glaucoma.

    The researchers also found a significant statistical link with heavy computer use among short-sighted workers. They suggested that the optic nerve in short-sighted people might have a structural condition that renders it more susceptible to computer stress than non-myopic eyes.
    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...ma-533366.html

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    I have eye problems, sometimes the pain is so intense I can't sleep. I have had to change my job to one which doesn't require looking at a screen too much.

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    You could have extreme photosensitivity. How is the fatigue when you are in the dark?

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