Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: "Black Invention" Myths

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Peeps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Last Online
    Saturday, February 11th, 2006 @ 05:57 PM
    Location
    Vinland
    Posts
    74
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post

    Post "Black Invention" Myths

    http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inventions/


    Black Invention Myths


    Perhaps you've heard the claims: Were it not for the genius and energy of African-American inventors, we might find ourselves in a world without traffic lights, peanut butter, blood banks, light bulb filaments, and a vast number of other things we now take for granted but could hardly imagine life without.

    Such beliefs usually originate in books or articles about black history. Since many of the authors have little interest in the history of technology outside of advertising black contributions to it, their stories tend to be fraught with misunderstandings, wishful thinking, or fanciful embellishments with no historical basis. The lack of historical perspective leads to extravagant overestimations of originality and importance: sometimes a slightly modified version of a pre-existing piece of technology is mistaken for the first invention of its type; sometimes a patent or innovation with little or no lasting value is portrayed as a major advance, even if there's no real evidence it was ever used.

    Unfortunately, some of the errors and exaggerations have acquired an illusion of credibility by repetition in mainstream outlets, especially during Black History Month (see examples for the traffic light and ironing board). When myths go unchallenged for too long, they begin to eclipse the truth. Thus I decided to put some records straight. Although this page does not cover every dubious invention claim floating around out there, it should at least serve as a warning never to take any such claim for granted.

    Each item below is listed with its supposed black originator beneath it along with the year it was supposedly invented, followed by something about the real origin of the invention or at least an earlier instance of it.

    http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inventions/
    Why They Hate Us by Joseph Sobran: Western man towers over the rest of the world in ways so large as to be almost inexpressible. It's Western exploration, science, and conquest that have revealed the world to itself. Other races feel like subjects of Western power long after colonialism, imperialism, and slavery have disappeared. The charge of racism puzzles whites who feel not hostility, but only baffled good will, because they don't grasp what it really means: humiliation. The white man presents an image of superiority even when he isn't conscious of it. And superiority excites envy. Destroying white civilization is the inmost desire of the league of designated victims we call 'minorities.' From Sobran's Newsletter, April 1997

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Wulfram's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last Online
    37 Minutes Ago @ 04:02 PM
    Ethnicity
    Mostly German/Some English/Some Irish
    Subrace
    Nordid
    State
    Texas Texas
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Occupation
    Demolition
    Politics
    Far Right
    Religion
    Anti-Christian
    Posts
    2,909
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    73
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    98
    Thanked in
    77 Posts

    Black Invention Myths

    These lies have been imposed on the Germanic people in America as well as Europe for too long. I will post the rest of them later on today (or tomorrow).
    Links are provided where further explanation is needed.


    Traffic Signal

    Invented by negro Garrett A. Morgan in 1924?

    The first known traffic signal appeared in London in 1868 near the Houses of Parliament. Designed by JP Knight, it featured two semaphore arms and two gas lamps. The earliest electric traffic lights include Lester Wire's two-color version set up in Salt Lake City circa 1912, James Hoge's system (US patent #1,251,666) installed in Cleveland by the American Traffic Signal Company in 1914, and William Potts' 4-way red-yellow-green lights introduced in Detroit beginning in 1920. New York City traffic towers began flashing three-color signals also in 1920.

    Garrett Morgan's cross-shaped, crank-operated semaphore was not among the first half-hundred patented traffic signals, nor was it "automatic" as is sometimes claimed, nor did it play any part in the evolution of the modern traffic light.

    http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/gasmask/page.html
    Gas Mask

    Garrett Morgan in 1914?

    The invention of the gas mask predates Morgan's breathing device by several decades. Early versions were constructed by the Scottish chemist John Stenhouse in 1854 and the physicist John Tyndall in the 1870s, among many other inventors prior to World War I.

    http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/gasmask/page.html
    Peanut Butter

    George Washington Carver (who began his peanut research in 1903)?

    Peanuts, which are native to the New World tropics, were mashed into paste by Aztecs hundreds of years ago. Evidence of modern peanut butter comes from US patent #306727 issued to Marcellus Gilmore Edson of Montreal, Quebec in 1884, for a process of milling roasted peanuts between heated surfaces until the peanuts reached "a fluid or semi-fluid state." As the product cooled, it set into what Edson described as "a consistency like that of butter, lard, or ointment." In 1890, George A. Bayle Jr., owner of a food business in St. Louis, manufactured peanut butter and sold it out of barrels. J.H. Kellogg, of cereal fame, secured US patent #580787 in 1897 for his "Process of Preparing Nutmeal," which produced a "pasty adhesive substance" that Kellogg called "nut-butter."
    George Washington Carver

    "Discovered" hundreds of new and important uses for the peanut? Fathered the peanut industry? Revolutionized southern US agriculture?

    Research by Barry Mackintosh, who served as bureau historian for the National Park Service (which manages the G.W. Carver National Monument), demonstrated the following:

    * Most of Carver's peanut and sweet potato creations were either unoriginal, impractical, or of uncertain effectiveness. No product born in his laboratory was widely adopted.

    * The boom years for Southern peanut production came prior to, and not as a result of, Carver's promotion of the crop.

    * Carver's work to improve regional farming practices was not of pioneering scientific importance and had little demonstrable impact.

    To see how Carver gained "a popular reputation far transcending the significance of his accomplishments," read Mackintosh's excellent article George Washington Carver: The Making of a Myth:

    http://www.network54.com/Forum/25624...king+of+a+Myth
    Automatic Lubricator, "Real McCoy"

    Elijah McCoy revolutionized industry in 1872 by inventing the first device to automatically oil machinery? The phrase "Real McCoy" arose to distinguish Elijah's inventions from cheap imitations?

    The oil cup, which automatically delivers a steady trickle of lubricant to machine parts while the machine is running, predates McCoy's career; a description of one appears in the May 6, 1848 issue of Scientific American. The automatic "displacement lubricator" for steam engines was developed in 1860 by John Ramsbottom of England, and notably improved in 1862 by James Roscoe of the same country. The "hydrostatic" lubricator originated no later than 1871.

    Variants of the phrase Real McCoy appear in Scottish literature dating back to at least 1856 — well before Elijah McCoy could have been involved.

    Detailed evidence: http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/mccoy/
    Also see: http://www.textbookleague.org/35fake.htm
    As well as: http://www.textbookleague.org/102mcd.htm
    Blood Bank

    Dr. Charles Drew in 1940?

    During World War I, Dr. Oswald H. Robertson of the US army preserved blood in a citrate-glucose solution and stored it in cooled containers for later transfusion. This was the first use of "banked" blood. By the mid-1930s the Russians had set up a national network (http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inv...dbank-ussr.asp) of facilities for the collection, typing, and storage of blood. Bernard Fantus, influenced by the Russian program, established the first hospital blood bank in the United States at Chicago's Cook County Hospital in 1937. It was Fantus who coined the term "blood bank."

    http://www.aabb.org/all_about_blood/...abb_faqs.htm#8
    Blood Plasma

    Did Charles Drew "discover" (in about 1940) that plasma could be separated and stored apart from the rest of the blood, thereby revolutionizing transfusion medicine?

    The possibility of using blood plasma for transfusion purposes was known at least since 1918, when English physician Gordon R. Ward suggested it in a medical journal. In the mid-1930s, John Elliott advanced the idea, emphasizing plasma's advantages in shelf life and donor-recipient compatibility, and in 1939 he and two colleagues reported having used stored plasma in 191 transfusions. (http://history.amedd.army.mil/booksd.../chapter11.htm) Charles Drew was not responsible for any breakthrough scientific or medical discovery; his main career achievement lay in supervising or co-supervising major programs for the collection and shipment of blood and plasma.

    More: http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inventions/drew.asp
    Washington DC city plan

    Benjamin Banneker?

    Pierre-Charles L'Enfant created the layout of Washington DC. Banneker assisted Andrew Ellicott in the survey of the federal territory, but played no direct role in the actual planning of the city. The story of Banneker reconstructing the city design from memory after L'Enfant ran away with the plans (with the implication that the project would have failed if not for Banneker) has been debunked by historians:

    http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inv...s/banneker.asp
    Heart Surgery (first successful)

    Dr. Daniel Hale Williams in 1893?

    Dr. Williams repaired a wound not in the heart muscle itself, but in the sac surrounding it, the pericardium. This operation was not the first of its type: Henry Dalton (http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inv...ery.asp#dalton) of St. Louis performed a nearly identical operation two years earlier, with the patient fully recovering. Decades before that, the Spaniard Francisco Romero (http://ats.ctsnetjournals.org/cgi/co...tract/64/3/870) carried out the first successful pericardial surgery of any type, incising the pericardium to drain fluid compressing the heart.

    Surgery on the actual human heart muscle, and not just the pericardium, was first successfully accomplished by Ludwig Rehn (http://ats.ctsnetjournals.org/cgi/co...tract/39/5/492) of Germany when he repaired a wounded right ventricle in 1896. More than 50 years later came surgery on the open heart, pioneered by John Lewis, C. Walton Lillehei (often called the "father of open heart surgery") and John Gibbon (who invented the heart-lung machine).

    What medical historians say:

    http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inv...artsurgery.asp
    "Third Rail"

    Granville Woods in 1901?

    Werner von Siemens pioneered the use of an electrified third rail as a means for powering railway vehicles when he demonstrated an experimental electric train at the 1879 Berlin Industrial Exhibition. In the US, English-born Leo Daft used a third-rail system to electrify the Baltimore & Hampden lines in 1885. The first electrically powered subway trains, which debuted in London in the autumn of 1890, likewise drew power from a third rail.

    http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inventions/3rdrail.asp
    Railway Telegraph

    Granville Woods prevented railway accidents and saved countless lives by inventing the train telegraph (patented in 1887), which allowed communication to and from moving trains?

    The earliest patents for train telegraphs go back to at least 1873(http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inventions/rrtel1.asp). Lucius Phelps was the first inventor in the field to attract widespread notice, and the telegrams he exchanged on the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad in January 1885 were hailed in the Feb. 21, 1885 issue of Scientific American as "perhaps the first ever sent to and from a moving train." Phelps remained at the forefront in developing the technology and by the end of 1887 already held 14 US patents(http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inventions/phelps.asp) on his system. He joined a team led by Thomas Edison, who had been working on his "grasshopper telegraph" for trains, and together they constructed on the Lehigh Valley Railroad one of the only induction telegraph systems ever put to commercial use. Although this telegraph was a technical success, it fulfilled no public need, and the market for on-board train telegraphy never took off. There is no evidence that any commercial railway telegraph based on Granville Woods's patents was ever built.

    About the patent interference case:
    http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inventions/rrtel2.asp
    Refrigerated Truck

    Frederick Jones (with Joseph Numero) in 1938? Did Jones change America's eating habits by making possible the long-distance shipment of perishable foods?

    Refrigerated ships and railcars had been moving perishables across oceans and continents even before Jones was born (http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inv...nstimeline.asp). Trucks with mechanically refrigerated cargo spaces appeared on the roads at least as early as the late 1920s (http://www33.brinkster.com/iiiii/inv...s/reftruck.asp). Further development of truck refrigeration was more a process of gradual evolution than radical change.
    Air Brake / Automatic Air Brake

    Granville Woods in 1904?

    In 1869, a 22-year-old George Westinghouse received US patent #88929 for a brake device operated by compressed air, and in the same year organized the Westinghouse Air Brake Company. Many of the 361 patents he accumulated during his career were for air brake variations and improvements, including his first "automatic" version in 1872 (US #124404).
    Air Conditioner

    Frederick Jones in 1949?

    Dr. Willis Carrier built the first machine to control both the temperature and humidity of indoor air. He received the first of many patents in 1906 (US patent #808897, for the "Apparatus for Treating Air"). In 1911 he published the formulae that became the scientific basis for air conditioning design, and four years later formed the Carrier Engineering Corporation to develop and manufacture AC systems.
    Airship

    J.F. Pickering in 1900?

    French engineer Henri Giffard successfully flew a powered navigable airship in 1852. The La France airship built by Charles Renard and Arthur Krebs in 1884 featured an electric motor and improved steering capabilities. In 1900 Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin's first rigid-framed dirigible took to the air. Of the hundreds of inventors granted patents for early airship designs and modifications, few succeeded in building or flying their craft. There doesn't appear to be any record of a "Pickering Airship" ever getting off the ground.

    US Aviation Patent Database, 1799-1909
    http://invention.psychology.msstate....tDatabase.html
    Automatic Railroad Car Coupler

    Andrew Beard invented the "Jenny [sic] coupler" in 1897?

    The Janney coupler is named for US Civil War veteran Eli H. Janney, who in 1873 invented a device (US patent #138405) which automatically linked together two railroad cars upon their being brought into contact. Also known as the "knuckle coupler," Janney's invention superseded the dangerous link-and-pin coupler and became the basis for standard coupler design through the remainder of the millennium. Andrew Beard's modified knuckle coupler was just one of approximately eight thousand coupler variations patented by 1900.

    http://laws.lp.findlaw.com/getcase/us/516/400.html#t2
    http://www.narhf.org/nar01/NAR01awards_coupler.html

  3. #3
    Account Inactive
    shannon kathleen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Last Online
    Saturday, February 25th, 2012 @ 12:44 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Irish
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Colorado Colorado
    Gender
    Age
    33
    Posts
    6
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    There is also the myth that white people are solely and directly responsible for the creation and spread of AIDS, especially among African populations. They claim we did this as a form of biological warfare against black populations. I think these myths stem from black people feeling frustrated over their own racial inadequacies. Thus to excuse or make up for it, they deny having any responsibility in it. In order to redeme themselves from these very obvious flaws, they paint a picture that explains why they are unable to make positive contributions to society, or why their race carries the highest rate of STDs and the like. The basis for such arguments are; contrary to the way things seem, we are actually pretty awesome, but unfortunately whitey destroys that reality for us.

Similar Threads

  1. "Judeo-Christianity": A Modernist Invention
    By Elessar in forum Comparative Religion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Monday, March 5th, 2012, 06:39 AM
  2. No Simple Victory - The Myths of the "Good War" (Norman Davies)
    By CordeliaforLear in forum Modern Age & Contemporary History
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sunday, December 21st, 2008, 08:24 PM
  3. Replies: 17
    Last Post: Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008, 09:27 PM
  4. "Aryan Sun-Myths - The Origin Of Religion"
    By Wuotans Krieger in forum Indo-Germanic Spirituality
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Tuesday, October 26th, 2004, 11:30 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •