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Thread: The Germans in Peru / A Germanic Colony in the Andes

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    The Germans in Peru / A Germanic Colony in the Andes

    A Germanic Colony in the Andes

    The name Pozuzo derives from the Amuesha and pozuza, meaning "Salt water rivers" The Germano–Austrian colony of Pozuzo (Pasco Department) has developed for more than a hundred years on the margin of historical events in Peru.

    The overland trip to Pozuzo, if done by the Carretera Central from Lima to La Oroya, has the unique attraction of passing through diverse climatic regions of Peru. The aridity of the coast gradually gives way to more verdant vegetation until you eventually reach the heights of the Andean Cordillera at an altitude of 4,800m (15,750 ft) at the Ticlio Pass.

    Depending on the season, great snowy expanses can be seen covering nearby summits. Once La Oroya is reached follow the turnoff towards Tarma. Further along the way lies San Ramón and La Merced. The last section of road to Oxapampa is unpaved and can be washed out during rainy season.

    The road to Pozuzo winds along steep cliffs and deep canyons over the Huancabamba River. It is surrounded by vibrant ferns and leafy trees, the banks are dotted with delicate orchids, and frothing cascades beckon the weary traveller to bathe in their fresh waters. Yanachaga–Chemillén National Park also lies on this route. Covering an area of 122,000 hectares, it extends into the Pozuzo, Villa Rica, and Palcazú districts (this last in the Oxapampa Province) and is a park with one of the largest varieties of flora and fauna in the world

    History

    In 1849, president Ramón Castilla, passed an immigration law and the first influx of Germans arrived under its protection, along with the help of businessman Antolín Rodulfo. Unfortunately the immigrants were never able to establish themselves. Having had to travel on foot to Tarapoto, no family arrived untouched by tragedy. Many died when crossing the high mountains, descending through the cliffs of the Montane forests, and from trecherous weather conditions. Because of this experience, Peru gained a poor reputation, with outright opposition to immigration in Germany.

    It was German traveller Baron Cosme Damián Schütz von Holzhausen, who, after visiting German colonies in Texas, had the idea of creating other colonies in South America.

    After a trip to the Alto Marañon area, he began to encourage immigration towards the Montane forests of Peru. On this trip in 1852 he established a friendship, and a small community with Manuel Ijurria, a miner from Cerro de Pasco.

    Finally, the Peruvian government accepted a Schütz–Ijurria proposal allowing the introduction of some 13,000 German colonists into the Amazonas region. Nevertheless, President Echenique scrapped the Immigration Law in 1953 and this contract was nullified. During the second term of Castilla, another Schütz–Ijurria contract was formed with the idea of bringing 10,000 Austrian and German immigrants. This document stipulated that the settlers would descend the Andean Cordillera to establish themselves at the meeting point of the Delfín and Huancabamba rivers. Instead of 500 settlers, in reality only 300 left the port of Amberes towards the Andes. Their march lasted two years and was extremely arduous. They arrived at Pozuzo on July 25, 1859.

    In total Some 150 colonists managed to establish themselves, and thus remained totally isolated from their home land and the rest of Peru. Nothing was heard of them for more than 120 years. During this time, the colony was totally self–sufficient, raising livestock, weaving, even making their own shoes. The population grew as its members married among each other and with natives of the region.

    In 1970 the first road to reach Pozuzo was built, an unreliable link due to washouts and landslides. It nonetheless allowed modernising advances and commerce to reach the colony. This access road also permitted many young members to leave town in search of higher education or simply to live in the capital.

    Today Pozuzo is a town marked by its roots. Typical tyrolese dress is worn on festival days, both German and Spanish are spoken and

    families still conserve names such as Schmidt, Heidinger, Müller, and Köhel. You can also see the natural and necessary growth of mestizaje in the town, the fruit the harmonious coexistence between colonist and native. This can be seen in family names native to the region combined with Tyrolese first and last names, giving way to a totally new generation of Peruvians.

    These latest generations have cultivated a new territory in the last thirty years a plan called ‘the conquest of the Codo de Pozuzo’. The development of the area locally known as the ‘elbow of Pozuzo’ was realised after many expeditions, where different crops were experimented with. Today the Municipality of Codo del Pozuzo stands with well–earned pride.

    Pozuzo City

    The settlers’ homes are a clear display of German architecture as adapted to the conditions and materials of the area. Buildings are characterised by their high peaked roofs (originally covered with wooden tiles and now with sheets of zinc) and exterior passages connecting rooms. In general, stables occupied the first floor, leaving the second, third, and even a fourth floor as living quarters. Nearby stood a mill for grinding sugar cane; an excellent example is the four–story home of Hernan Egg at Palmira.

    In the centre of town you can visit the churches of San José de Pozuzo and Sagrado Corazón de Jesus, along with other manifestations of typical architecture of the region. The Francisco Schafferer Museum is also found here, displaying remains of ceramics dating from between 6,000 to 1,800 B.C., a period in which Pozuzo was inhabited by native tribes. There is also a display of numerous weapons, utensils, and other memorabilia that belonged to the first settlers. Another place to visit is the first hanging bridge (known as Emperor Wilhelm II, and which has been recently restored) that was used by the colonists to cross the Huancabamba river.

    As for economic activity, Pozuzo is a colony dedicated primarily to the breeding of livestock (and to a lesser degree, dairy production), as well as growing coffee, rice, and fruit. On a tour of the outskirts of town one passes several handsome farms, their green fields highlighting the jungle which surrounds them, as well as beautiful wooden homes. These characteristics create a very particular ambience, difficult to find in other parts of Peru.

    Evidently, Pozuzo is a great attraction for its character, the beauty of its countryside and its festivals. The most important festival is celebrated every July 25th—the day of the town’s foundation—and lasts until the 30th. This colourful commemoration boasts an array of with typical costumes and customs. Austrian and German music is played and sang, torneos de cinta or ‘ribbon tournaments’ are held, where dextrous riders, in an act of gallantry, capture rings and coloured ribbons to offer them to the local young ladies. Also worth seeing is the float parade and cockfights (for the strong stomached). Afterwards, typical dishes are served, with recipes original to Pozuzo, Austria, and Germany, among which stand out semola soup (Griesnockerlsuppe), beef and vegetable stew (Fleischtrudel mit gemuse), sausages and smoked hams.

    The area surrounding Pozuzo, apart from being excellent for camping, is also apt for adventure sports such as rafting, parapente, hang gliding, trekking, and motorcycle tours; these activities, along with the hospitality of its inhabitants, will make your visit an experience difficult to forget.

    http://www.rumbosonline.com/articles/14-74-destinationspozuzo.htm









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    The Living conditions seem to be fairly grim. I think see a few mestizo faces as well. What good is it to maintain a culture without maintaining the ethnic identity that goes with it?

    I think this particular group would have been better off if their ancestors had stayed in Austria.

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    As The Horned God stated, the German culture may have been preserved, but not the ethnicity. Every one of those girls appears to be the product of inter-breeding with Amerindians and/or Spaniards. Some look to be pure-bred indigenous Peruvians (the girl on the far right of the second picture, in the red dirndl, for example). If this community is being highlighted to represent the preservation of ethnic Germans abroad, then I must say, our cause is in deep trouble.

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    This girl in the article also looks mixed:



    But I don't think this community is a good representation of Germanic enclaves.

    Here some pictures of Aussiedler from Russia for example:




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    I can imagine BRD eagerly writing a law to accept these mestizos, just like they take in the Russkie-"Germans". And continue to forbid an unmixed German-American or German-Canadian or German-Australian, etc.


    Quote Originally Posted by Siebenbürgerin View Post
    I don't think this community is a good representation of Germanic enclaves.

    Here some pictures of Aussiedler from Russia for example:


    Those links to the Russians photos do not work. Does anyone know how to find the true address of the .jpg image of an attachment? The attachment url is bizarre and does not allow [img] to work.

    Those attachments can be seen in this post: http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.p...3574#post53574

    Some appear German, but the blonde one in image #1 looks highly Slavic.

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    The guy in the back left of the 1st pic doesn't look Germanic, the others from Russia look fine.

    The Peruvians look mainly to be indians in German costumes
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    Quote Originally Posted by Siebenbürgerin View Post
    This girl in the article also looks mixed:



    But I don't think this community is a good representation of Germanic enclaves.

    Here some pictures of Aussiedler from Russia for example:




    No, they are probably just as mixed as the so called 'Germanic' mestizos in the former pictures. The difference is, however, the race with whom they mixed isn't quite as noticeably different from German (though it is still very, very noticeable).

    It is sad, but Germanic colonists are for the most part all mixed, be it with Mongoloids, Celts (particularly Brits) or Slavs. Now which of these are salvageable and which are not is quite evident.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagna View Post
    ...after visiting German colonies in Texas...
    These towns still exist. I have several friends whose families still practice aspects of their German culture.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geribeetus View Post
    No, they are probably just as mixed as the so called 'Germanic' mestizos in the former pictures. The difference is, however, the race with whom they mixed isn't quite as noticeably different from German (though it is still very, very noticeable).

    It is sad, but Germanic colonists are for the most part all mixed, be it with Mongoloids, Celts (particularly Brits) or Slavs. Now which of these are salvageable and which are not is quite evident.
    What nonsense, the Russia Germans in the pictures don't look foreign except for the guy in the back like SwordOfTheVistula said. There are Germans here who look similar to them, they must be Baltid mixes which is one of the German subraces. There are Aussiedler like Siebenbürgerin and Hrodnand who look even typical for Germany.

    As for the mestizo "Germans", it's clear they're mixed with non-Europeans. They're perfect examples why ethnic preservation matters too, not just culture and language like some former members used to say.

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    Those children from South America are obviously mixed with a bit of Amerindian (Castiza)

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