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Thread: What are the Top 10 Plants in your Garden?

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hersir View Post
    Cool, I'll order some next season. Important not to get overwhelmed when you're starting out, so gonna plan what I'm gonna get.
    Caution, gardening is more addictive than anything I can think of.
    Life is like a fire hydrant- sometimes you help people put out their fires, but most of the time you just get peed on by every dog in the neighborhood.

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    You can make pumpkin pie using regular pumpkins, but it's not as good as using pie pumpkins, which are the small pumpkin-shaped squash.

    Squash in general is a good to grow if you have the land and want to be more self-sufficient. Some store for a considerable amount of time and are nutritious.

    Quote Originally Posted by wallflower View Post
    ?

    How can you make a pumpkin pie out of squash? If you use squash, than it is not a pumpkin pie, but a squash pie.

    But an interesting fact: Most of the "pumpkin" that is sold in cans isn't actually pumpkin, but some kind of squash very similar in taste and colour to pumpkin. I believe I read this somewhere... don't know if it's actually true or not.

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    Potatoes, beets, and carrots are pretty much essential. Tomatoes are probably the most productive (aside from zucchini?) depending on variety but the canning is a pain.

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    My tomatoes didn't turn out good, I think I did something wrong. The tomato plants grew large, but I only get 2-3 small tomatoes. I fertilized and had them in the sun. I guess it wasn't very smart to plant them at fall I will plant at spring next year. The plants I had this year that turned out really good were:

    baby leaf salad
    chives
    chinese chives (tastes like garlic)
    peppermint
    basile
    ruccoula

    All of the, except the salad, still gives yield. I just cut of the leaves and they grew out again, I haven't used so much of the chives, but I wonder if as long as the roots are there it will grow out again.

  5. #45
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    Regarding ‘conventional’ gardens, the last one I planted was two years ago.

    Two gardens, actually. A big one in the back, and a smaller one in the front.

    I planted a whole back garden full of yellow squash and pumpkins. The goram deer ate almost every single blossom as soon as it appeared. Finally ONE survived that would have turned into a pumpkin, but they ate that one too!

    I planted beans, which did well, until the deer started grazing on those as well. Other than constructing a massive fence, there is no way to keep those critters out here.

    But for the most part, they leave the native plants alone.

    For the front garden I planted garlic, onions, carrots, dill, cucumbers, tomatoes, and some spices such as rosemary, parsley and cilantro.

    All of it got obliterated by endless rains that flooded my front garden and drowned out the plants. A half row of onions survived, then something ate them later on.

    This year I did something a bit different.

    What’s in my Garden?

    I’ll list the top 10 things that are in my garden, by virtue of percentage. In other words, the one at the top is the most that is in my garden, and the one at the bottom is the least.

    Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). ALL parts of the plant edible. Makes great greens and soup.

    Dock (Rumex obtusifolius, Rumex crispus.) I use mostly the leaves of this, for soup, but the roots of (most) species, as well as the seeds are edible.

    Plantain (Plantago major & various other species, all edible) The potherb, NOT the banana looking thing! I use the leaves as a potherb and for soup. The seeds are also quite tasty.

    Wild Onion & Wild Garlic (Allium cernuum & Allium canadense). No explanation needed.

    Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carotus.) The ancestor of the modern carrot. Use just like a carrot for flavoring. Dried seed makes an excellent spice as well. In bloom flowering umbels are excellent lightly fried.

    Sow Thistle (Sonchus oleraceus) & Spiny Sow Thistle (Sonchus asper). Great lightly steamed and then fried with some olive oil or bacon, and served over a bed of rice. Delicious.

    Thistle (Circium vulgare & various other species.) Many uses for this once you learn to get around the thorn. If the plant is young enough all the thorns will ‘nerf’ if cooked in soup, so you don’t even need to remove them. Just chop, and throw in soup.

    Cat’s Ear (Hypochaeris radicata) I use the leaves as a potherb.

    Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) This has medicinal use, and as a painkiller.

    Sheep Sorrel (Rumex acetosella) Great in soup, or fresh leaves on a sandwich.

    Also growing wild, around the property are such things as:

    Burdock (Arcticum minus & Arcticum lappa) (Roots are excellent in soup, or stir fried. The Asians call it ‘Gobo’.
    Wood Sorrel (Oxalis stricta) Those sour tasting little shamrock looking things with yellow flowers. Great in a soup, or as a tart garnish on a sandwich.
    Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) Great in soup. As the name suggests, kind of mildly garlic tasting. I love it.
    Blackberries
    Mayapples. (Only eat the fruit when yellow and very ripe. And only the pulp. Not the casing and not the seeds. I can eat handfuls of it and have no issue, but then again, I grew up eating them. Thus, most people would probably have… we’ll just say… ‘gastrointestinal’ issues that I would not.
    And a plethora of wild edible mushrooms. Dryad’s saddle, (Get them young and tender. Old ones are shoe leather.), various forms of boletus (my favorite), oyster mushrooms (fantastic!) and the occasional field mushroom.

    Note that my ‘garden’ is my yard and surrounding property. I don’t dig it, or plow it, or till it. I do nothing other than trim it once in a while, and it provides me almost year round fresh food and greens. I don’t have anything against anyone who prefers a ‘traditional’ garden. I’ve just found that for me, I get healthier food, with much less work, when I let nature take care of the details.

    The vast majority of these plants have been imported from Europe by our ancestors, and naturalized here in America. These are all very useful potherbs. Some with medicinal, as well as culinary uses, but that’s a topic for another thread.


    As to someone mentioning Lambsquarters:

    Lambsquarters are Chenopodium album. It tastes like spinach because it’s a relative of spinach. Also called ‘Wild Spinach’ for a very good reason. And yes, it’s excellent stuff. I have a little one growing in a pot on my windowsill at this very moment. It just happened to grow there in a plug of soil from the yard, so I have a nice green, pretty decorative plant in the middle of winter. I’ve also got some chives and dandelions growing in the same pot. They’re bringing me too much joy to eat at the moment. When all is snowy and cold and frozen outside, that tiny little pot of greenery goes much further towards keeping our spirits nourished, than it ever would in our stomachs.

    Sorry this was windy. But I hope it was somewhat informative.

    Plant lore is one of my favorite hobbies. It’s also what I eat 95% of the year.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Egrestu View Post
    Regarding ‘conventional’ gardens, the last one I planted was two years ago.

    Two gardens, actually. A big one in the back, and a smaller one in the front.

    I planted a whole back garden full of yellow squash and pumpkins. The goram deer ate almost every single blossom as soon as it appeared. Finally ONE survived that would have turned into a pumpkin, but they ate that one too!

    I planted beans, which did well, until the deer started grazing on those as well. Other than constructing a massive fence, there is no way to keep those critters out here.

    But for the most part, they leave the native plants alone.
    Deer eat a lot of the things I plant also. I do two things to control this.

    I have a old dog that barks at them and keeps some of the stupid ones away. The smart ones know he is harmless and keep on eating my veggies.
    The second thing I like deer meat, we get extra tags to thin the herd every year. Most of the meat I take I give away to people that could use it. However we eat about 150 pounds of deer meat a year ourselves. I look at it like this " they eat my veggies and I eat them " one way or another I get my veggies.

    Rabbits are another story. I have a rabbit problems around the house, however there are no rabbits out in the woods or fields because of predators. So I try and scare them out of the gardens and use bone and blood meal to try and keep them away. I don't shoot the rabbits because there just are not enough around.
    Life is like a fire hydrant- sometimes you help people put out their fires, but most of the time you just get peed on by every dog in the neighborhood.

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    Eating the deer is always a possibility. Deer are quite delicious.

    The local deer herd was somewhat suffering for a while from being preyed upon by coyotes of all things. Whatever idiot introduced them and thought they’d somehow not bleed over into other states just needs a few of those things dropped off in their own back yard…

    However the coyotes have been disappearing lately. I think the farmer across the way got tired of them, and decided to ‘thin’ them a bit. He can thin them all the way, as far as I’m concerned. They are not a natural part of this ecosystem, and are destructive here anyway. Also, they have lost their fear of man, and will just show up in your backyard. Which isn’t very good if you have kids playing. They won’t usually attack an adult male. But they’ll attack children with little to no hesitation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hersir View Post
    My tomatoes didn't turn out good, I think I did something wrong. The tomato plants grew large, but I only get 2-3 small tomatoes. I fertilized and had them in the sun. I guess it wasn't very smart to plant them at fall I will plant at spring next year.
    My tomatoes didn't do well this year either. I had a couple that grew to almost 6 foot tall, but didn't produce hardly any tomatoes. I planted 4 different varieties. All the previous years my tomato plants did very, very well. I normally can them, make salsa and sauces with them...though my hens LOVE the cherry tomatoes...it's pretty funny watching them run around chasing them!

    Other veggies/fruits I grow are:

    Potatoes
    Carrots
    Green Beans
    Cucumbers
    Water Melon
    Onion
    Strawberries - planted in 2009 and 2010
    Raspberries - just planted in 2010
    Grapes - just planted in 2010
    Corn - this hasn't done well at all. I think one crop in 5 was worth anything.
    Lavender - which I use in my craft projects.

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    I really enjoy gardening, and is one of my most notable projects I have for this summer. Garden fresh, straight from the garden vegetables and herbs, are a great way to eat healthy and organic, save money, and the environment.

    If I had to pick what my top 10 favorite plants to grow in the garden, in no particular order

    Basil *
    Oregano *
    Spinach
    Arugula
    Kale
    Broccoli
    Beets (I would like to attempt to make pickeled beets one day)
    Tomatoes
    Cabbage (would like to attempt my own homemade sauerkraut-wish I had great gran's recipe!)
    Squash (good in the fall)

    *Herbs are grown in the individual pot, not garden


    But if you seen my garden lately you would probably think my favorite plants are various types of weeds!

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