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Thread: What is in a Name? Should Germanics Have Germanic Names?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rothhammer View Post
    My first name is Jesse. I've always hate it. Finding ot it originated in the old testament didn't help at all, even before I left Christianity.

    My middle name is Alonzo. I've only known Spanish and Italians to have the name, and only Italians to spell it with a "z". My Grandpa Alonzo, who I got the name from, died in 1968, so I never got to ask him why we have the name, especially since my dad's side of the family kept track of our geneology and we've got no traces of Spanish or Italian anywhere. Anywhere, at all. No one else named Alonzo either. I've looked up the origins of Alonzo online, and it says the earliest known forms of the name were Gothic though, and all future forms, to include Alonzo, came from that, so I don't mind it so much.

    My wife and I agree that whenever we have a child, if it's a boy, we'll name him "Wolfgang". It was my great great great grandfather's name. I know that's a ways back, but it's a name that there's no easy way out with. No simplified nickname that makes it sound less Germanic. Whenever I have a kid, I want them to constantly be aware of their heritage. To wake up every morning and the first time someone calls their name, they remember their ancestors came from Germany. Well, if having the last name "Rothhammer" doesn't already do that.

    My son's name is from my great-great-great grandfather too, it's a good thing...some believe that by giving your kids an ancestor's name it reincarnates your ancestor in your child, keeping the family spirit alive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by renownedwolf View Post
    Germanics should have Germanic names, especially when one names ones child.

    Names have power and meaning.

    I actually had an argument with the missus over this a few days ago, (The stupid names she wanted gah! I WILL name them what I choose.) she reckoned it didn't matter but I explained that the child would grow up with a non-Germanic name and research it and say 'oh! that's OK' because it's my name, or my best friends name, why didn't my parents name me something else etc, thereby creating a false sense of normalcy with outsiders and an alienation to their own blood.

    It's little things like that that accumulate and rot our society. Every Jamahl, Jacob or Laquitia is another nail in the soul of our people.
    I agree. Names are very important.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rothhammer View Post
    My first name is Jesse. I've always hate it. Finding ot it originated in the old testament didn't help at all, even before I left Christianity.

    My middle name is Alonzo. I've only known Spanish and Italians to have the name, and only Italians to spell it with a "z". My Grandpa Alonzo, who I got the name from, died in 1968, so I never got to ask him why we have the name, especially since my dad's side of the family kept track of our geneology and we've got no traces of Spanish or Italian anywhere. Anywhere, at all. No one else named Alonzo either. I've looked up the origins of Alonzo online, and it says the earliest known forms of the name were Gothic though, and all future forms, to include Alonzo, came from that, so I don't mind it so much.

    My wife and I agree that whenever we have a child, if it's a boy, we'll name him "Wolfgang". It was my great great great grandfather's name. I know that's a ways back, but it's a name that there's no easy way out with. No simplified nickname that makes it sound less Germanic. Whenever I have a kid, I want them to constantly be aware of their heritage. To wake up every morning and the first time someone calls their name, they remember their ancestors came from Germany. Well, if having the last name "Rothhammer" doesn't already do that.
    On Alonzo, the way it is spelled is Italian-based, but other countries have other spellings for it, even ancient Germanic:

    Hildefons, Hadufuns, Adalfuns, Alfons (Ancient Germanic), Alfons (Dutch), Alphonse (French), Afonso (Galician), Alfons (German), Alphonsus (History), Alfons (Polish), Afonso (Portuguese), Alfonz (Slovene), Ildefonso (Spanish)

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    I think names should fit in with the person's ethnicity. My married last name is Austrian and my own ethnicity is German and English. My given name, my first name, is actually Scottish, so I think really I'd be happier with something else. My husband usually calls me Liesl as a nickname and that is quite fitting!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scario View Post
    On Alonzo, the way it is spelled is Italian-based, but other countries have other spellings for it, even ancient Germanic:

    Hildefons, Hadufuns, Adalfuns, Alfons (Ancient Germanic), Alfons (Dutch), Alphonse (French), Afonso (Galician), Alfons (German), Alphonsus (History), Alfons (Polish), Afonso (Portuguese), Alfonz (Slovene), Ildefonso (Spanish)
    Actually, these are variants of three different names.

    • Adalfuns, Alfons (Ancient Germanic), Alfons (Dutch), Alphonse (French), Afonso (Galician), Alfons (German), Alphonsus (History), Alfons (Polish), Afonso (Portuguese), Alfonz (Slovene)
    • Hildefons, Ildefonso (Spanish)
    • Hadufuns

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    Surnames are the greatest part of our heritage ...
    In the Frysk language, my surnames translate in English to mean Strong & Northman. I can't ask for more than that !!!

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    My first name is a nickname form of a name from the Bible, but I was named after a non-blood ancestor. I looked up the meaning of the entire name, and my nickname form means "My father." Yeah, that makes total sense. Also my father is a d* If it weren't for my "ancestor" I'd hate it. Also it's a fairly common name for dogs, which I find amusing. I have a Hebrew/Biblical name and I'm neither Jewish nor a Christian.
    My middle name is Michelle, so common I have no problem blurting it out on here. My father's name is Michael, so it's just the feminine version of that. Also I was born in New Orleans and my mom wanted something French. Once, years ago I asked her about my name and she wanted it to be spelled Myshelly. The nurse who told her she couldn't do that is a hero of mine. Granted I think my mom may have been confusing Mi Cherie with a name. I'm actually a descendant of the Huguenots, so ... yay!
    My last name is Scottish, and while I am part Scottish, my father's father was adopted and I have no real blood-ties to it.

    If my mom had known that I have the same birthday as my great-grandfather, I could have been named after him. James - Jamie.

    Hmm... just curious, would any name or consider naming their child after an ancestor if the child happened to be born on the same day as that ancestor?
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    I have two Christian names, and it bugs the hell out of me, I cannot hear them without thinking I am named after not one, but two jews... My calling name or in Afrikaans Noem naam is not that uncommon amongst Germans as I share it with a certain gentleman in the Redbull Air race...

    If ever I decide to have children I will not give them Christian names but rather a healthy dose of Germanic names...

    My surname is from the most successful Afrikaner family, well when measured in offspring that is, however I have never been able to determine exactly where It originates from however it is certainly Dutch, If any of our Dutch users think they might be able to assist please PM me. Anyhow my grandmother’s maiden name is Paulsen, which as far as I know is a Danish and Norwegian patronymic surname. I must say that my fathers entire family looks very much Borreby to me, My mother’s surname is Hanekom and as far as I can gather originated from parts of lower Saxony, My mother family especialy the eyes look very Faelid again, well atleast to me.
    Although the word "Commando" was wrongly used to describe all Boer soldiers, a commando was a unit formed from a particular district. None of the units was organized in regular companies, battalions or squadrons. The Boer commandos were individualists who were difficult to control, resented formal discipline or orders, and earned a British jibe that"every Boer was his own general".

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    My first name is based on a very old Roman male name and is very common and boring... same with my middle name. My surname is more common in Germany than it is here and I have been picked on for it my whole life (I guess it sounds weird to most Americans), but I am very proud of it When I have kids I am going to give them Germanic names. I've actually already thought of a few that I really like/ are family names.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Heinrich Harrer View Post
    I think my first name has a greek origin. For my children I would probably pick germanic names, but I'm not that annoyed by names traditionally used in our countries which have roman or greek roots.

    I'm much more annoyed by this new trend of picking cheap sounding anglo names like Cindy, Justin, Dennis, Marvin, Jaquelin, Kevin, etc.

    Usually parents who choose these names have a low education and most of their knowledge about the world comes from trashy TV shows.

    I remember actually having read an article about name-based discrimination a while ago (it's only available in German):
    http://www.spiegel.de/schulspiegel/w...649421,00.html
    Shoddy machine translation by Google Translate:
    On a thread and forum dedicated for Germanic culture, as a proud German you uphold Greece and Rome before denigrating Anglo-Saxons as 'cheap'... In America, it's because of the snobbery and resistance of Germans playing "White Ethnics" in solidarity with non-Germanics (Sicilian Mafiosos and IRA fanatics) against Anglo-Saxons why America is no longer a bastion of Germanic culture. Can you square that circle?! Ask Æmeric all about it; this is no bullshit to say the truth.

    Idiotic rhetoric shall not go unanswered. You know, this is the same mentality of those who have apologetics for a Roman Axis inclusive of Tokyo whilst dogging Germanic Anglo-American Allies despite the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact. Oh, we're the 'trashy' Germanics, unlike the hypocrites who haven't any guts to take a stand and draw the line in the sand, if anybody put their money where their mouth is, because they cannot realistically do so at the cultural crossroads of the Continent and still be arbeiter of Mitteleuropa, thus justifying why they should take on the Mediterranean mantle of other peoples' religious and political legacies for their own, even as Anglo-Saxons cry "Brexit!"

    It's unwarranted that you should first praise your own folk for something you then deplore in our folk, just projecting your negativity onto fellow Germanics. After all, this thread, like the forum itself, are supposed to be drawing upon a common Germanic heritage and if, as you are fine with Germans plastering your kids with foreign names, why the vitriol aimed at Anglo-Saxons doing the same and from the same selection as your own kin?

    It's not Anglo-Saxons apart from our German aristocracy who went by the name Augustus in common with their countrymen like the French using Auguste. Why is it that Latin Caesar is somehow German Kaiser, but that Slavs use Karol from Karl to denote kingship? As it is, most of those names you mentioned aren't even Anglo-Saxon, but you delight passing the buck to us for hypocritical straw man bashing. I can see most of those names in Alsace-Lorraine, save Marvin would be Martin and Kevin would be held by Irish Catholics in exile from Anglo-Saxon Protestant rule. Not so 'Anglo' as insinuated, eh?!

    Cindy: Greek from Hyacinth via French
    Justin: Greek from Justinian
    Dennis: Greek from Dionysius via French
    Marvin: English, Norse or Welsh*
    Jaquelin: Hebrew from Jacob (a favourite "German name", due to Yids?!) via French
    Kevin: Irish from Caoimhín

    https://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=marvin

    Marvin Name Meaning
    from the Middle English personal name Merewine (Old English Maerwin, from mær ‘fame’ + win ‘friend’). from the Old English personal name Merefinn, derived from Old Norse Mora-Finnr. from the Old English personal name M?rwynn, composed of the elements m?r ‘famous’, ‘renowned’ + wynn ‘joy’. from the Welsh personal name Merfyn, Mervyn, composed of the Old Welsh elements mer, which probably means ‘marrow’, + myn ‘eminent’.

    Source: Dictionary of American Family Names ©2013, Oxford University Press
    Quote Originally Posted by Þoreiðar View Post
    My first name is of Jewish origins. I'm thinking about changing it to one of my grandfathers' name; either 'Thor Olav' or 'Reidar'. I've also considered a combination of the two, but it wouldn't sound very natural.
    Explanation for your screen name is very cool. I could have similarly been named Archie Howard or Howard Archie, both of Germanic origin. As it is, I do have both first and second of Celtic origin, but firstly common where Norwegians settled among the Scots and secondly in Northern England where the Bretons set up Norman yoke.

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