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Thread: Are There Any Buddhists on Skadi?

  1. #21
    Senior Member Sarajevo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Méldmir View Post
    Yes



    You didn't answer why you were against minarets. Minarets are just like church towers, Muslims are not likely to become more extreme just because their Mosque has a minaret, do they? Alot of "nationalists" just oppose minarets because they "don't fit in the landscape" (as opposed to church towers). But still they welcome mosques being built :S What is your opinion?

    And what is your opinion on Christian immigrants from the Middle-east, such as the Assyrians in Södertälje? Should they be allowed to build churches (with towers), even though there is lots of crime in Södertälje just as in Malmö?
    I don't welcome mosques, nor temples being built, I'm also against the building of churchs. I hope that answers your question. And no, I don't think people get extreme or criminal because of the building of those.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ćdiruc View Post
    Even when Buddhism reached the Middle-East in Jesus' time and to an extent into Europe it was much too late then. Buddhism failed to make any appeal to even the Greco-Romans.
    Christianity was forced on to the germanic people, with the change of some elements to fit the germanic societies. You are right on that. But I think you are taking the wrong perspective of the matter of buddhism in the western society...Buddhism didn't appeal to the germanic societies of that time. Great. But christianity did, partially. But most of us are not living in a society nowadays where we consider us belonging to eg. asatrú, most of us would consider ourself christian, and maybe buddhism might have a future nowadays anyway, if it don't, no problem, people survive even without religion

    Buddhism is a philosophy and when "Buddhism reached the Middle-East in Jesus' time", buddhism ideas already existed, to a great extent in the ideas of christianity, but Buddha also founded this philosophy at the same time as Western Philosophy was developed by the Greeks. Pythagoras was also introducing a doctrine of reincarnation. If Buddhism maked any appeal or not, I don't know, but it didn't stay.

    That's one of the reasons why buddhism never was "needed" or "could apply" on to the germanic society. Today alot of people are christians, and don't define themself as "germanic" as might you and I, but for that matter, they still could convert buddhism (if they like) cause it can be adjusted to our society of today.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarajevo View Post
    Buddhism is a philosophy and when "Buddhism reached the Middle-East in Jesus' time", buddhism ideas already existed, to a great extent in the ideas of christianity, but Buddha also founded this philosophy at the same time as Western Philosophy was developed by the Greeks. Pythagoras was also introducing a doctrine of reincarnation. If Buddhism maked any appeal or not, I don't know, but it didn't stay.
    Do you want to say that the reincarnation doctrine has its origins in Buddhism? I've read a while ago that the early Christians believed in reincarnation, belief which was 'banned' later by the Church. Do you mean that this reincarnation belief that Christianity had at the beginning was of Buddhist influence?
    Die Farben duften frisch und grün... Lieblich haucht der Wind um mich.

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    I actually think reincarnation came from old religions in India, and then was a part of Hinduism. It followed into Buddhism, but was also rejected by some Buddhists later on, like Zen Buddhists in Japan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Méldmir View Post
    I actually think reincarnation came from old religions in India, and then was a part of Hinduism. It followed into Buddhism, but was also rejected by some Buddhists later on, like Zen Buddhists in Japan.
    Any religion a Japanese person might follow, should be taken with a grain of salt to base an argument upon. This counts doubly for a religion which is in itself more of a philosophy that can technically co-exist with several religious beliefs, such as is the case with Buddhism, Confucianism, or indeed a few others.

    What the Westerner doesn't see is that the Japanese are happy to have "several faiths at once", depending on the situation, since basically the Japanese are collectively still Shinto, which is their Folkish, ancestral concept within which faith takes place. That they might define themselves also as let's say a Christian, might depend on the setting, or could be due to agreeing with the philosophy, but has no bearing to their religious life, really, you don't see the Japanese "Christian" go to church much.

    The Japanese who vouches to be a Buddhist does so due to following/accepting its philosophy, where it compliments but not supersedes his idea of life. Buddhists in Japan are thus a bad example to base any type of argument upon, something that both "Japanophiles" () and "Misonipponists" () generally forget, they're judging the implications of a foreign culture by their own standards.
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
    -Die alte Seele trauernd und verlassen / Verblassend in einer erklärbaren Welt / Schwebend in einem Dunst der Wehmut / Ein Schrei der nur unmerklich gellt-
    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    Any religion a Japanese person might follow, should be taken with a grain of salt to base an argument upon. This counts doubly for a religion which is in itself more of a philosophy that can technically co-exist with several religious beliefs, such as is the case with Buddhism, Confucianism, or indeed a few others.

    What the Westerner doesn't see is that the Japanese are happy to have "several faiths at once", depending on the situation, since basically the Japanese are collectively still Shinto, which is their Folkish, ancestral concept within which faith takes place. That they might define themselves also as let's say a Christian, might depend on the setting, or could be due to agreeing with the philosophy, but has no bearing to their religious life, really, you don't see the Japanese "Christian" go to church much.

    The Japanese who vouches to be a Buddhist does so due to following/accepting its philosophy, where it compliments but not supersedes his idea of life. Buddhists in Japan are thus a bad example to base any type of argument upon, something that both "Japanophiles" () and "Misonipponists" () generally forget, they're judging the implications of a foreign culture by their own standards.
    Surely, Buddhist monks in Japan must take Buddhism seriously

    I doubt every Japanese person follows "the mix religion" even though a majority might.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Sarajevo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Víđálfr View Post
    Do you want to say that the reincarnation doctrine has its origins in Buddhism? I've read a while ago that the early Christians believed in reincarnation, belief which was 'banned' later by the Church. Do you mean that this reincarnation belief that Christianity had at the beginning was of Buddhist influence?
    Absolutely not.
    These ideas probably existed long before buddhism, hinduism and christianity, in the mind of mankind. Probably even before someone spoke about something like religion.

    What I'm saying is just that this particular idea, together with alot of other ideas were important to humans during that time, and arose even more in Europe with philosophers like eg. Sokrates. We were talking about why it can't be adopted to a germanic society, not what influences from buddhism that can have been coming into christianity or vice versa.

    Quote Originally Posted by Méldmir View Post
    I actually think reincarnation came from old religions in India, and then was a part of Hinduism. It followed into Buddhism, but was also rejected by some Buddhists later on, like Zen Buddhists in Japan.
    It's true that reincarnation both take place in hinduism and buddhism, but buddhism reminds (in other aspects) more of the religion that was in India before hinduism and is something like a revolution towards hinduism....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarajevo View Post
    It's true that reincarnation both take place in hinduism and buddhism, but buddhism reminds (in other aspects) more of the religion that was in India before hinduism and is something like a revolution towards hinduism....
    Certainly reincarnation would be a Hindu influence rather than a pre-Hindu influence, considering that reincarnation was known widely amongst Indo-Europeans, including the Westernmost branches, which had little to no further contact with their Easternmost spiritual cousin, Hinduism, at the point at which Hinduism in turn made contact with the respective religions in the area.
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
    -Die alte Seele trauernd und verlassen / Verblassend in einer erklärbaren Welt / Schwebend in einem Dunst der Wehmut / Ein Schrei der nur unmerklich gellt-
    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    Certainly reincarnation would be a Hindu influence rather than a pre-Hindu influence, considering that reincarnation was known widely amongst Indo-Europeans, including the Westernmost branches, which had little to no further contact with their Easternmost spiritual cousin, Hinduism, at the point at which Hinduism in turn made contact with the respective religions in the area.
    Hinduism wasn't the oldest I-E Religion in the area, there were the Vedic religions that was its predecessor. He probably meant them by "pre-Hindu".

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    Senior Member IvyLeaguer's Avatar
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    !

    I'm probably the weirdest person on this entire forum, but if I'm to answer the original question, then yes, I'm well versed in "Tibetan" Buddhist literature and try to live like one, every single day, to achieve enlightenment, i.e. Nirvana.

    With that said, I also consider myself a GNOSTIC Christian, an Ariosophist, and I believe in reincarnation. I don't see a conflict here with this since, as mentioned before, Buddhism is a philosophy more than it is a religion. No one "worships" the Buddha. One emulates him.

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    When it comes to reďncarnation and reaching Nirvana, I see no need to resort to Buddhism. These concepts can be found, in a somewhat different way, in the religion of our ancient ancestors as well.

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