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Thread: Consequences of Mixed Blood In the Third Reich?

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    Question Consequences of Mixed Blood In the Third Reich?

    How were people treated in the Third Reich if they were half Germanic, and half Polish? Was that a problem? That has been eating at me for a while. Thanks..

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    There's two things I can think of. First, the Lebensborn Project (excerpt from Wikipedia):

    "Lebensborn (Fount of Life, in antiquated German) was a Nazi organization set up by SS leader Heinrich Himmler, which provided maternity homes and financial assistance to the wives of SS members and to unmarried mothers, and which also ran orphanages and relocation programmes for children.[1]

    Initially set up in Germany in 1935, Lebensborn expanded into occupied countries in western and northern Europe during the Second World War. In line with the racial and eugenic policies of Nazi Germany, the Lebensborn programme was restricted to individuals who were deemed to be "biologically fit" and "racially pure", "Aryans", and to SS members. In occupied countries, thousands of women facing social ostracism because they were in relationships with German soldiers and had become pregnant, had few alternatives other than applying for help with Lebensborn."

    The other thing I can think of has to deal with Lebansraum. Here's another excerpt from Wikipedia:

    "Under Generalplan Ost, a percentage of Slavs in the conquered territories were to be Germanised. Those unfit for Germanisation were to be expelled from the areas marked out for German settlement. In considering the fate of the individual nations, the architects of the Plan decided that it would be possible to Germanise about 50 percent of the Czechs, 35 percent of the Ukrainians and 25 percent of the Belorussians. The remainder would be deported to western Siberia and other regions. In 1941 it was decided that the Polish nation should be completely destroyed; the German leadership decided that in ten to 20 years, the Polish state under German occupation was to be fully cleared of any ethnic Poles and resettled by German colonists."

    So I guess those looking German enough and went along with the program stood a good chance of being treated decently. Those who didn't......well I think you can guess.

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