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Thread: The Children of Nazi Leaders

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    The Children of Nazi Leaders

    In a story that originally aired April 14, 1991, Holocaust Remembrance Day, Morley Safer reports on the children of Nazi leaders, living in the shadow of the sins of their fathers.

    Video: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=2512321n

    Some more information:

    Bettina Goering, whose great-uncle was the Nazi leader Hermann Goering, ran away at 13, lived on a commune in India, fled to the US and was sterilized. All to escape the legacy of her last name. Bettina's journey to cleanse herself of the family's nazi past is revealed in the documentary "Bloodlines" - which shows her emotional encounters with Ruth Rich, a child of Holocaust survivors. Bettina's father Heinz was adopted by Hermann Goering, and like him, Heinz become a Luftwaffe fighter pilot. He was downed over the Soviet Union. Freed in 1952, he traveled back only to find that his two brothers had killed themselves and the family's fortunes were gone.
    Bernd Wollschlaeger, former officer in the Israel Defense Forces, was born the son of a WWII German tank commander: a third-generation warrior who got the Iron Cross - pinned on his uniform by Adolf Hitler. Bernd came to view his father, Arthur, as a drunk whose life had been shattered by the Nazis' defeat. Arthur had been educated at NAPOLA, the elite Nazi training academy. He never joined the Nazi Party, but he embraced vision of making Germany great again. Arthur, wounded 5 times during the war, won the Iron Cross for a tank charge in Poland. Sometimes old army buddies dropped by singing Deutschland üeber alles and Die Fahne hoch, the Nazi Party anthem.
    "I used to feel cursed by my name. Now I feel blessed", said physiotherapist Matthias Goering, a descendant of Hermann Goering. He says he did not have a happy childhood. His great-grandfather and Hermann's grandfather were brothers, and that was enough to ensure problems after the fall of the Third Reich. His father, a military doctor, was a Soviet POW, but returned with his anti-Semitic views intact. "When times were hard our parents would say to us, 'You can't have that, because all our money's gone to the Jews.'" Other descendants of Nazis have trodden the same path. Katrin Himmler, who's uncle was the SS commander Heinrich Himmler, married an Israeli.
    From: http://hitlernews.cloudworth.com/fam...-relatives.php

    What do you think about the attitude of these people?

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    Hmm... undoubtedly parents are part of children's heritage. Even if they did many negative things, I don't think it's alright to reject them. Ultimate judging of parents is up to God. Because ordinary peoples can't send them to hell or heaven. It's difficult to be known as the son of... or daughter of... named Nazi leader. But if that's your identity, you must live with it, good or bad, in my view.

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    This whole article is focused on descendants who are either ashamed or critical of their Nazi connections. There are however, scores of others who were not quite so brainwashed in Post War Europe.

    Wolf Rüdiger Hess, despite cruelly being unable to see his father for almost twenty five years, remained fiercely loyal to him and was also an admirer of Hitler until his dying day. He called his father - a man of peace.

    Gudrun Himmler had many setbacks in life caused by her family name. She struggled to maintain a job because of it. She remains proud of her father and has been active in Far Right Politics and in welfare support for former SS Soldiers and their families.

    Edda Göring is another who holds her father in high regard and has refused to criticise him.

    I am sure there are scores of others out there who suffered in Post War Germany because of their parents but didn't succumb to "re-education".

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    Edda Göring


    Edda Göring (2 June 1938 – 21 December 2018) was the only child of German politician, military leader, and leading member of the Nazi Party Hermann Göring, by his second marriage to the German actress Emmy Sonnemann. The family name is also spelt in English-language sources as Goering.

    Born a year before the outbreak of the Second World War, Edda spent most of her childhood years with her mother at the Göring family estate at Carinhall. As a child she received many historical works of art as gifts, including a painting of the Madonna and Child by Lucas Cranach the Elder.

    In the final stages of the war, she and her mother moved to their mountain home at Obersalzberg, near Berchtesgaden. After the war, she went to a girls-only school, studied at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, and became a law clerk. In the 1950s and 1960s many of the valuable gifts she received as a child, including the Madonna and Child painting, became the subject of long legal battles, most of which she eventually lost in 1968.

    Unlike the children of other high-ranking Nazis, such as Gudrun Himmler and Albert Speer, Jr., Göring did not speak in public about her father's career. However, in 1986 she was interviewed for Swedish television and spoke lovingly of both her parents.


    Early years


    Edda grew up at Carinhall and like other daughters of high-ranking Nazi leaders and officials she was called Kleine Prinzessin ("Little Princess").When she was one year old, the journalist Douglas Reed wrote in Life magazine that she was, "a sort of Crown Princess.


    1945 and after


    During the closing stages of the Second World War in Europe, Göring retreated to his mountain home at Obersalzberg, near Berchtesgaden, taking Emmy and Edda with him. On 8 May 1945, Germany surrendered unconditionally, and on 21 May, a few days before her seventh birthday, Edda was interned with her mother in the U.S.-controlled Palace Hotel, code-named Camp Ashcan, at Mondorf, in Luxembourg. By 1946, the two had been freed and were living at one of their own houses, Burg Veldenstein, in Neuhaus, near Nuremberg. There they were visited by the American officer John E. Dolibois, who described Edda as, "a beautiful child, the image of her father. Bright and perky, polite and well-trained". During the Nuremberg trials, Edda was allowed to visit her father in prison. He was sentenced to death, but on 15 October 1946, the night before his scheduled execution, Göring committed suicide by swallowing a cyanide pill.

    By April 1946, Emmy and Edda Göring were living in a small house at Sackdilling.

    In 1948, while living near Hersbruck with her mother and her aunt Else Sonnemann, Edda entered the St Anna-Mädchenoberrealschule ("Saint Anne's High School for Girls") at Sulzbach-Rosenberg in Bavaria, where she remained until gaining her Abitur. In November 1948, the family moved to Etzelwang to be nearer the school. In 1949, Emmy faced legal problems regarding some valuable possessions and explained many of them as the property of Edda, now aged ten. After leaving school, Edda studied law at the University of Munich and became a law clerk; she later worked for a doctor. A private letter from an unknown relative in 1959 stated that "the baby is now a young lady, slim, fair-haired and pretty. She lives with her mother on the 5th floor of a modern apartment block in the Munich city centre".






    Later life



    In her later years, Edda worked in a hospital laboratory and was hoping to become a medical technician. She was a regular guest of Hitler's patron Winifred Wagner, whose grandson Gottfried Wagner later recalled:

    "My aunt Friedelind was outraged when my grandmother again slowly blossomed as the first lady of right-wing groups and received political friends such as Edda Goering, Ilse Hess, the former National Democratic Party of Germany chairman Adolf von Thadden, Gerdy Troost, the wife of the Nazi architect and friend of Hitler, Paul Ludwig Troost, the British fascist leader Oswald Mosley, the Nazi film director Karl Ritter and the racialist author and former cultural leader of the Reich Hans Severus Ziegler."

    Edda worked in a rehabilitation clinic in Wiesbaden and devoted herself to taking care of her mother, remaining with her until she died on 8 June 1973. After that, for five years in the 1970s, Edda was the companion of the Stern magazine journalist Gerd Heidemann. Heidemann had bought the yacht Carin II, which had been Hermann Göring's, and according to Peter Wyden "He charmed Edda, pretty, not married, and devoted to the memory of her father, the Reichsmarschall, and started an affair with her. Together, they ran social events aboard the boat. Much of the talk was of Hitler and the Nazis, and the guests of honor were weathered eyewitnesses of the hallowed time, two generals, Karl Wolff and Wilhelm Mohnke

    For some years Edda made public appearances, attending memorials for Nazis and taking part in political events, but she later became more withdrawn. Unlike the children of other high-ranking Nazis, such as Gudrun Himmler and Albert Speer, Jr., she never commented publicly on her father's role in the Third Reich . In the 1990s, she said of her father in an interview:

    "I loved him very much, and it was obvious how much he loved me. My only memories of him are such loving ones, I cannot see him any other way. I actually expect that most everybody has a favorable opinion of my father, except maybe in America. He was a good father to me.”

    In 2010, Edda said of her uncle Albert Göring for an article in The Guardian, "He could certainly help people in need himself financially and with his personal influence, but, as soon as it was necessary to involve higher authority or officials, then he had to have the support of my father, which he did get.”

    The governments of West Germany and the reunited Germany denied Edda Göring the pension normally given to the children of government ministers of the old German Reich. As of 2015, she was reported to be still living in Munich. In that year, she unsuccessfully petitioned the Landtag of Bavaria for compensation with respect to the expropriation of her father's legacy. A committee unanimously denied her request.

    She died on 21 December 2018 and was buried at an undisclosed location in the Munich Waldfriedhof.

    Edda Göring - Wikipedia 11 Mar 2019.

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