This is Christian folklore, of course, and the story is far from fresh - there are also more than four different ways of telling it - I wouldn't have posted it, were it not for a "sign" I received.

When I found this article and saw the English made a docu called "And did those feet..." , my Winamp player - totally randomly - started playing Rukkanor's song 'Jerusalem', the lyric consists of William Blake's famous poem And did those feet in ancient time:

And did those feet in ancient time
Walk upon England’s mountains green?
And was the holy Lamb of God
On England’s pleasant pastures seen?
And did the Countenance Divine
Shine forth upon our clouded hills?
And was Jerusalem builded here
Among these dark Satanic Mills?

Bring me my Bow of burning gold;
Bring me my Arrows of desire;
Bring me my Spear; O clouds unfold!
Bring me my Chariot of fire!
I will not cease from Mental Fight,
Nor shall my Sword sleep in my hand,
Till we have built Jerusalem
In England’s green & pleasant Land.


I got 22.000 mp3s - what are the odds? I didn't even know Rukkanor had a song that makes use of Blake's poem.

The more famous musical interpretation of Hubbert Parry, written in 1916, is also associated with British patriotism, anti-modernism, post-modernism, and socialism - and the BNP uses it as the official party hymn.

Quote Originally Posted by BBC
Jesus 'may have visited England'

Jesus Christ could have come to Britain to further his education, according to a Scottish academic.

Church of Scotland minister Dr Gordon Strachan makes the claim in a new film entitled And Did Those Feet.

The film examines the story of Jesus' supposed visit, which survives in the popular hymn Jerusalem.

Dr Strachan believes it is "plausible" Jesus came to England for his studies, as it was the forefront of learning 2,000 years ago.


"Coming this far wasn't in fact that far in the olden days," Dr Strachan told BBC Radio 4's The World At One. "The Romans came here at the same time and they found it quite easy."

Dr Strachan added that Jesus had "plenty of time" to do the journey, as little was known about his life before the age of 30.

The legend that Jesus Christ came to Britain was popularised in a poem written by William Blake in the early 19th Century and made famous as a hymn 100 years later.

Now the first words of the hymn - "And did those feet" - are the title of a new film based on a book researched by Dr Strachan, who lectures on the history of architecture at Edinburgh University.

"It is generally suggested that he came to the west of England with his uncle, Joseph of Arimathea, who was here for tin," said the academic.

Dr Strachan claimed Jesus Christ could have come to England to further his education.

"He needed to go around to learn bits and pieces about ancient wisdom, and the druids in Britain went back hundreds if not thousands of years. He probably came here to meet the druids, to share his wisdom and gain theirs."

Among the places Jesus is said to have visited are Penzance, Falmouth, St-Just-in-Roseland and Looe, which are all in Cornwall, as well as Glastonbury in Somerset - which has particular legends about Jesus.

"St Augustine wrote to the Pope to say he'd discovered a church in Glastonbury built by followers of Jesus. But St Gildas (a 6th-Century British cleric) said it was built by Jesus himself. It's a very very ancient church which went back perhaps to AD37."

The film And Did Those Feet is being screened on Friday in central London.
Source