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Thread: Mongolia's Nazis on the Rise

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    Grin Mongolia's Nazis on the Rise

    By Kirril Shields, Thursday, December 04, 2008


    Following the July 1 riots a spate of repetitious graffiti began appearing on the walls of Ulaanbaatar’s buildings. Graffiti, either as an art form or used as political slander, is relatively uncommon in Mongolia’s capital city, yet this recent trend was spray-painted across buildings, on bus stations, on the walls of monasteries, over the windows of Chinese restaurants, even on national monuments.

    The graffiti is the work of one of Mongolia’s right-wing organisations, the M.Y.A. (Mongolian National Group). It depicts a swastika accompanied by the party’s acronym, the word ‘Aries’, and at certain sites, the addition of sentences that vary slightly but largely translate to ‘all Chinese must die.’

    This abject racism and open hostility is indicative of the nationalism currently bubbling to the surface within the country. To date, there are three ultra-nationalistic groups registered as NGOs. The most notable of these is Dayar Mongol (All or Whole Mongolia), a group that rose to prominence with the role it played in the July 1 riots; the group marched in front of a central police barracks threatening anyone from entering while attempts were made by rioters to damage and destroy the complex. Their agenda, they claim, was “to help and save people. Many people could have made a big mistake.”

    Just as aggressively as the group barred the entrance to the police headquarters, waiting to expel angry and drunken rioters, so too their open hatred of immigrants, in particular the Chinese. “We hate the Chinese, Koreans and Vietnamese,” the current head of Dayar Mongol calmly states in an interview, “because they do a lot of illegal things such as human trafficking, selling drugs and prostitution […] We are against Chinese influence as it’s dangerous for Mongolia’s national security.” The Asian Gypsy website writes that Dayar Mongol “also sends a warning to Mongolians working with foreigners against national interest, promising the ‘traitors will be dealt with harshly.’” Rhetoric from the M.Y.A. echoes Dayar Mongol: “The Chinese are our main enemies as they contaminate Mongolian blood by getting married to Mongolian women, and intend to assimilate Mongolians to Chinese.”

    To be ‘dealt with harshly’ by one of these groups means anything from being beaten, having your shop windows repetitively smashed, being publicly spat on, to the extremity of being killed. The leader of Blue Mongol (the third of these right-wing groups), B. Enkhbat, was on trial in June of 2008 for “the suspected murder/manslaughter of his daughter’s boyfriend […] whose patriotism was questioned.” He was later found guilty. The former head of Dayar Mongol was executed for a similar crime, a crime the current leader describes as “a passing away. He fought for security and the goodness of the Mongol nation and its people.” Ola Wong from the Far Eastern Economic Review in April of 2008 highlighted another of the trio’s racial intimidations. “[They] shave the heads of women caught sleeping with Chinese men.” G. Damdinsuren, a Dayar Mongol board member, justified the tactics. “It is for their own good […] A small nation can only survive by keeping its blood pure.’’

    Racial hatred –and the perceived “need to keep a nation’s blood pure”- is the obvious backbone to all right-wing groups globally, and though they normally represent an extremity within society, in Mongolia, these right-wing organisations reflect the sentiment of a large percentage of the population. Ask Mongolians what they think of their southern neighbours and at best the response is one of reluctant acceptance. “To say that Mongolian’s feelings towards China borders on racism and hatred would not be an understatement,” writes a Mongolian on the Internet. In an article for the Sydney Morning Herald, John Garnaut discussed similar feelings of resentment. “Amarbayasgalan runs a small trading company that imports all manner of goods from China. He personally knows ‘some good Chinese, some bad,’ but this nuance is not widely shared among his friends.” The closely related rise of right-wing groups, he continues, “is fueling an already toxic concoction of racism, historical grievance, Chinese insensitivity and, above all, a pervading fear of economic annihilation.”

    This nationalistic and anti-Chinese mindset is the reason why pro-Mongolian groups such as Dayar Mongol, Blue Mongolia and the M.Y.A. are beginning to swell in popularity. Membership is on a sharp rise, two of the groups profess, and so are public monetary donations. “We are many,” the head of Dayar Mongol proudly boasts. There is even international support, says Murgun-Erdene, head of the M.Y.A., supplied by other neo-Nazi organisations in Russia and Germany. While financial help for Dayar Mongol has yet to come from international neo-Nazis, the relationship they have formed with their cross-border counterparts is one of “an understanding in philosophy.” The M.Y.A, however, reveals that organizations both national and international “invest in us.”

    Finding funding within the nation is not a farfetched concept, yet receiving funding and support from international bodies outside of Asia seems somewhat ironic. So too does the blatant use of logos and rhetoric from Hitler and the Third Reich’s regime: either a great irony or a huge lack of education on these Mongolian neo-Nazis’ part. The head of M.Y.A. refutes the idea. “We are nationalists,” he says “because we distribute views of nationalism. In other words, we can be called Nazis. Generally, people believe that Nazis are fierce, but this is wrong. In my opinion, every country and every nation has some nationalists.”

    If this nationalism were purely Mongolian in form, it would make Murgun-Erdene’s statement a little easier to understand. As it is, the head of the M.Y.A. arrives at an interview wearing an Iron Cross, a hat with the SS Death’s Head pinned to its front and military fatigues; he has not donned anything that resembles traditional Mongolian attire, nor do the two ‘minders’ who accompany him.

    It becomes clear during the interview that these right-wing groups have neither remorse, nor more importantly, any real idea why they use (even quasi-worship) Third Reich iconography and ideals. While the swastika, as numerous historians and authors note, has its origins in a Buddhist tradition and was bastardised by Germany’s National Socialists in the early twentieth century, the SS icons and the use of various pieces of Nazi uniform are not so easily excused.

    One justification or explanation, states Murgun-Erdene when asked about the correlation between Mongolia and Hitler’s despotic Germany, is that he believes Hitler was, in many ways, a student of Chinggis Khaan. “Historically, when Hitler was reading the history of Chinggis Khaan in prison, he enjoyed the book and chose this sign as his symbol.” He also adds that the way Hitler conquered the world with his blitzkrieg was reminiscent of Chinggis Khaan’s art-of-war. Jack Weatherford, author of the best-selling history Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World, does not agree. “The Secret History of the Mongols was not available in Germany until the 1940s, nearly two decades after Hitler’s imprisonment,” Weatherford said. On the similarity of ethos between the two rulers, he again disputes any similarity. “Chinggis Khaan believed in the unity of all people under heaven and in respect for all religions. In this regard I see no similarity between him and Hitler.”

    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum makes interesting note of just where Mongolians stood in the eyes of the Third Reich. “The Germans carried out systematic mass killings of persons […] and systematically selected from among Soviet prisoners of war persons perceived to have ‘Asian’ or ‘Mongolian’ characteristics in order to shoot them.” In another great irony, Weatherford noted, “the Germans […] considered the Mongols as the opposite to the Germans. They taught that the existence of retarded children among the Germans was a result of the rape of pure German women by Mongols during the invasion of the thirteenth century.”

    Statements such as these highlight a lack of insight into both Germany’s history and the expansion of the Mongol Empire by Mongolian right-wing groups. Propaganda such as: “We tell the young not to have close relationships with foreigners and to contaminate our Mongolian blood. We are also anti-companies and organizations which mediate between foreigners and Mongolians, and do not allow them to marry. Agitating the public is an essential way to gain people’s awareness of our activities,” does not reflect the unity and respect Chinggis Khaan is said to have extolled. “Seemingly, without a sense of what the Nazis actually did, this phenomenon is more about ‘tough guys’ viewing Hitler as a great conqueror, similar to Chinggis Khaan” a Mongolian citizen comments on their blog.

    The skewed view of history voiced by groups such as the M.Y.A. is another of the naiveties that engulfs the nation. While under Soviet rule, Mongolians were taught that the Nazis were “bad” but were not schooled on the Holocaust. More recently, education in many schools has passed over the Second World War altogether. “In my opinion,” writes a man called Tuvshin after a survey he conducted suggested 90 percent of Mongolians believe in the politics of the Nazis, “this reflects the opinion of Mongolians who believe in a history transcribed by poor literature and ineffective secondary schooling. So it’s inevitable that we have racist attackers who call themselves neo-Nazis, yet who believe they support human rights and the nation.”

    A lack of education and the amount of ‘poor historical literature’ also provides explanations for a Nazi themed pub which contains Nazi flags, Third Reich political posters, display cases of mannequins dressed in Nazi uniforms and photos of Goebbels, Himmler and the likes. It accounts for groups of motorcyclists partly dressed in SS uniform, taxis adorned in the red and black flag of the facists, and the abundance of photos of Hitler hanging beside portraits of other famous world leaders found in the nation’s capital. Unfortunately, the irony of believing the rhetoric of the Third Reich is not lost on those Mongolians caught in Russia’s current wave of nationalism. As reported in the RIA Novosti in 2006, “Two Mongolian students were beaten on Saturday in the St. Petersburg subway. Routine attacks by skinheads and youth gangs on foreigners with non-Slavic features have also been reported in other Russian cities.” More recently, Mongolians were victims of Neo-Nazi attacks in Prague and in southern Germany.

    Back in Ulaanbaatar, news such as this does little to deter the enthusiasm of the M.Y.A. They even take on similarities in their aggressive methods to stamp out foreign interest and influence. “All members study the art of fighting including battle sambo and karate and we are in training […] Someone who protests our activity can’t overcome us.”

    In a 2002 address to the United Nations by the Mongolian government’s former representative, P. Gansukh, a correlation between social issues and the rise in right-wing nationalism within his country was noted. “My delegation wishes to single out the fact that racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance are closely linked with the socio-economic factors. Inequitable economic and social conditions can breed and foster racism and racial discrimination, while reduction of poverty and unemployment, overcoming economic backwardness would affect the human rights protection positively.” In another ironic twist, according to Murgun-Erdene, it was on the government’s advice that he registered M.Y.A. as an NGO. The Ministry of Justice suggested a number of smaller parties “with the same goal in mind” unite to strengthen the organisation politically and economically.

    Complicity with government offices and organisations is also evident in an article found on the Montsame news site. It reports that members of Dayar Mongol “joined with the Police Department of Sukhbaatar district” to check that Chinese and Korean shops and companies had removed any signs written in their native tongue and had them replaced with Cyrillic script. The ‘raid’ was initially instigated by Dayar Mongol after sending these companies a three-day written warning.

    Working in close proximity with the government does not mean, for Murgun-Erdene, that the M.Y.A. allies itself to any political party, nor politics at large. “We don’t fiddle with politics. We want to purge and improve current society. Our main goals are to remain Mongolian and to keep Mongolian blood fresh and to establish good order.” While he believes both the ruling MPRP and their opposition, the DP, are “wrong in their ideals,” he does not outline why. Dayar Mongol are not so timid. They believe, the UB Post reported in 2007, that “high ranking officials are corrupt and are giving the land to foreigners.” To tackle the issue not only did they stage a number of protests in Sukhbaatar Square, but members of both Blue Mongolia and Dayar Mongol ran for parliament in the 2008 elections, both failing in their attempt. That was not due to a lack of public support, noted the Asian Gypsy blog, but a lack of campaign experience, a lack of publicity, and a lack of substantial finance.

    “Oddly, most Mongolian neo-Nazis don’t want to promote the death of human beings, which they also think leads to them being able to implement Nazism correctly, which the Germans could not do. In my opinion, though they call themselves Nazis, they don’t understand the concept of being a Nazi,” writes a Mongolian citizen. Yet racial hatred -and a nation’s complicity- is not so far from implementing ‘Nazi concepts.’ Add to that an ignorance that comes with a lack of education, a yearning to better -in some degree- what other great leaders had previously tried, an increase in the divide between rich and poor, and an insidious pattern takes on a dimension reminiscent of 1920s Germany.

    Whether nationalism spreads to the extent it did 80 years ago remains to be seen. Yet even if racial hatred grows to a small percentage of what occurred in Germany under the rule of Hitler, that in–of-itself is a frightening concept. Unfortunately, if the spate of graffiti, the rise in racial attacks, or the general public’s opinion of their southern neighbour is a measure of racial intolerance, the ‘small percentage’ mark has already been surpassed. Slow as the bubbling may seem, if government organisations, the public, international companies and the naivety of those who broadcast the rhetoric, begin to believe their own propaganda, what began as a slow simmer may eventually begin to boil.


    Source: http://ubpost.mongolnews.mn/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&i d=2446&Itemid=42


    The Neo-Nazis of Mongolia: Swastikas Against China


    A current of anti-Chinese xenophobia has fueled the rise of an unlikely neo-Nazi movement. Why swastikas and racist dogma have taken hold in Mongolia.

    In the Mongolian capital Ulan Bator, "Shoot the Chinese" is spray-painted on a brick wall near a movie theater. A pair of swastikas and the words "Killer Boys ...! Danger!" can be read on a fence in an outlying neighborhood of yurt dwellings. Graffiti like this, which can be found all over the city, is the work of Mongolia's neo-Nazis, an admittedly implausible but often intimidating, and occasionally violent, movement.




    Ulan Bator is home to three ultra-nationalist groups claiming a combined membership of several thousand — a not insignificant number in a country of just 3 million people. They have adopted Nazi paraphernalia and dogma, and are vehemently anti-Chinese. One group, Blue Mongolia, has admitted to shaving the heads of local women found sleeping with Chinese men. Its leader was convicted last year of murdering his daughter's Mongolian boyfriend, who had merely studied in China.

    The neo-Nazis may be on society's fringe, but they represent the extreme of a very real current of nationalism. Sandwiched between Russia and China, with foreign powers clamoring for a slice of the country's vast mineral riches, many Mongolians fear economic and ethnic colonization. This has prompted displays of hostility toward outsiders and slowed crucial foreign-investment negotiations.

    Fifty-year-old Zagas Erdenebileg is the leader of Dayar Mongol (All Mongolia), the most prominent of the neo-Nazi groups. "If our blood mixes with foreigners', we'll be destroyed immediately," says Erdenebileg, who has run unsuccessfully for parliament four times. He loathes the Chinese — whom he accuses of involvement in prostitution and drug-trafficking — and reveres Genghis Khan, who he says influenced Adolf Hitler. I ask him if he considers his adoption of the beliefs of a regime that singled out and executed people with Mongol features from among Soviet prisoners of war to be in any way ironic. "It doesn't matter," he shrugs. "We share the same policies."

    If Erdenebileg is the elder statesman of Mongolia's neo-Nazis, Shari Mungun-Erdene, the 23-year-old leader of the roughly 200-strong Mongolian National Union (MNU), is the new kid on the block and sports a swastika tattoo on his chest. The MNU takes vigilante action against law-breaking outsiders, Mungun-Erdene says, mainly Chinese. When I ask what kind of action, he replies, "Whatever it takes so that they don't live here." At other times, though, he comes across as an overzealous adolescent. He opens his laptop to show photos of his neo-Nazi buddies. But beside the folders entitled "Guns" and "Skinheads" are others with names like "My Car" and "Mom in Japan."





    Dagva Enkhtsetseg, program manager for the Open Society Forum, an Ulan Bator-based organization that promotes public participation in civic life, points out that the neo-Nazis don't enjoy broad support. A graduate in Mongolian nationalism, she argues that hard-line nationalism's allure is subsiding as more young Mongolians are exposed to globalization or study abroad. That was evident during the presidential election in May, when bogus accusations that Democratic Party leader and eventual winner Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj was part Chinese fell on deaf ears. "In the past that would have worked," Enkhtsetseg says.

    The neo-Nazis still pose some threats, however. In May, a newsletter of the international development charity Voluntary Service Overseas reported allegations that two Peace Corps volunteers were "severely beaten" outside a pub after a confrontation with Dayar Mongol members. (Erdenebileg denies his group's involvement.) One 25-year-old American living in Ulan Bator, who didn't wish to be named, said he was accosted by neo-Nazis at a nightclub for cavorting with a Mongolian woman. "After they showed a swastika, my initial thought was, This isn't going to be a normal fight," he says. "They wanted to send a message." That message, delivered by spray paint or fists, translates to "get out."


    Source: http://www.mitchmoxley.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=articl e&id=66&Itemid=3&parid=3

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    So, Mongolians are now Aryan too?

    Now, that is news


    On the other hand, I'm not so sure if this is really so bad. Obviously the idea of national socialism is far from being lost, and even theoretical enemies of us can find something valuable in it.
    And even their completely inappropiate misuse of the Third Reich decoration does us maybe a favour. The imagery becomes a common sight in news again. This, on the tons of ever-repeated phrases, will turn people even more deaf to nowaday's propaganda. People simply become tired of it, not least because their reality is far from being the promised 'multikult heaven'. People wake up to the negative sides, one by one and slow, but many feel that there is something really really wrong. When such things make news, one or another will start to think about alternatives to the current flow of things.

    This is not the most negative thing that can happen. After all, when every nation would be ns, there wouldnt be mass immigration, in no direction. Everyone would sweep before his own door, and in the end everyone would be happy. Blut und Boden is an idea that is true for every folk that still does remember its roots and identity.

    Sure, the Mongolians should use their own culture decoration for that and don't steal another's. On the other hand, it is not really unclever. You set a signal that you're really serious about it, and the anti-communism connotation included in the imagery is a strong signal against China's imperialism. Russian neo-nazis do that too, India anyway and many other's too. And after all, it really doesnt matter how you decorate yourself when you claim your nation to your own people, you're labeled nazi regardless.
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    Quote Originally Posted by velvet View Post
    So, Mongolians are now Aryan too?
    At least that'd quench all those discussion over whether Finns are Aryan or Mongols, because if Mongols are Aryan, so are Finns even if they were Mongols. I shall be off to close the respective topics right away.

    On the other hand, I'm not so sure if this is really so bad. Obviously the idea of national socialism is far from being lost, and even theoretical enemies of us can find something valuable in it.
    I'm curious though how the ideology would fit in with the largely nomadic lifestyle which traditionally represents Mongolian culture. Sedentiary lifestyles have only been increasing in the past few decades and most Mongols are still proud to be "nomadic people from the Steppes".

    Surely, since National Socialism is essentially designed to apply to a sedentiary society rather than a nomadic one, this would conflict with their traditional lifestyle? I'd be curious how such would be applied to the circumstances of Mongolian traditional custom?

    This is not the most negative thing that can happen. After all, when every nation would be ns, there wouldnt be mass immigration, in no direction.
    TBH, this is the first time I've heard of mass immigration into Mongolia. I was always of the impression that Mongols lived in some Chinese areas rather than vice-versa. But you always learn anew.

    Blut und Boden is an idea that is true for every folk that still does remember its roots and identity.
    Indeed, but again - where does the question of soil come into a nomadic people that are only bound to a wider soil, that being the steppes. I have however heard that many Mongolians aren't happy about continuing sedentism. I have also heard that many Mongolians are afraid for the loss of identity, few people know to play the traditional Mongolian violin these days - at least so I gathered from a documentary I saw ages ago.

    And after all, it really doesnt matter how you decorate yourself when you claim your nation to your own people, you're labeled nazi regardless.
    Yes, and sadly so. This is a situation where both "standard patriots" and genuine National Socialists aren't entirely happy about. The former aren't happy because they don't connect an ideology to their patriotism and hope for organic development of the folk and its customs. The latter aren't happy because a whole load are lumped with them who don't quite agree with many goals of National Socialism.

    And then as well, neither of them are particularly happy about the negative stereotype of the term "Nazi" and the imagery connected - for different reasons, but both certainly find it insulting and an untrue propagandistic representation of their views.
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd
    I'm curious though how the ideology would fit in with the largely nomadic lifestyle which traditionally represents Mongolian culture. Sedentiary lifestyles have only been increasing in the past few decades and most Mongols are still proud to be "nomadic people from the Steppes".

    Surely, since National Socialism is essentially designed to apply to a sedentiary society rather than a nomadic one, this would conflict with their traditional lifestyle? I'd be curious how such would be applied to the circumstances of Mongolian traditional custom?
    Well, I was just thinking loud, and at one point I lost track of my thoughts because I was interrupted, I dont know anymore what I wanted to say....

    However, I think the Mongolians cant really go on with their nomadic life style anyway. Sure, some do, but they become less. This is part of the current global development, when you have nations around you with borders and all, you're forced to have borders too. Borders limit your nomadic life-style, especially when some of these borders bar you from originally your 'soil'.
    This is a negative side of nomadic life style, and also our own ancient life style which wasnt always fully non-normadic either. Your soil is not defined, you dont claim it your property, still it is your roots, your heritage and your home. This clashes with imperialistic attempts to seize your soil. Our soil was seized by the Roman empire, the Mongolian's soil is seized by Russia and China.

    Might be that the complete Third Reich reality is not applicable to Mongolia, but it wouldnt be applicable to today's Germany either, so we, like them, would need to find new / other ways to apply ns to our nations. For that reason, I dont see a big problem when they find the idea as such (and you made once a nice thread how differently one can interprete ns vs. n s ) attractive for themselves


    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd
    TBH, this is the first time I've heard of mass immigration into Mongolia. I was always of the impression that Mongols lived in some Chinese areas rather than vice-versa. But you always learn anew.
    Well, as far as I know Mongolia lost a lot of land to China and their time under sovjet rule werent good for them either. Just a few month ago I've seen a docu about how negatively globalism impacted on these people. From a european standpoint it might be no problem when Chinese or Vietnam or whatever Asian immigrate into an Asiatic nation, but it is the same, when viewed closely, like here with mass immigration of Austrians f.e. into Iceland. The people might be genetically similar and compatible (although A->I might already be a fringe case), it is still, in a microcosmos, a vast difference, culturally and subracially.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd
    Indeed, but again - where does the question of soil come into a nomadic people that are only bound to a wider soil, that being the steppes. I have however heard that many Mongolians aren't happy about continuing sedentism. I have also heard that many Mongolians are afraid for the loss of identity, few people know to play the traditional Mongolian violin these days - at least so I gathered from a documentary I saw ages ago.
    Well, as said, just because you dont claim the soil your property doesnt mean it is not your soil in the sense of heritage and identity.

    I also dont see why the general idea of national socialism isnt applicable to a nomadic folk. They need the nation's borders to protect them from outside influences, what they do in the inside, on a social basis, strengthening their community sense (which people have regardless of living in steady villages or in traveling tents), depends on their traditional social structures. The wider idea of ns is in my view indeed easily applicable to them as well.

    And remember, on the bottom of ns is the small community, the Gaue, ns is far from being designed for big cities with city people only.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd
    And then as well, neither of them are particularly happy about the negative stereotype of the term "Nazi"
    Yes, and the more the current mainstream stereotype gets diffused, even through weird neo-nazi Mongolians, the better in the end for us.
    The average lefty would go quite far to argue Mongolians, non-whites, who by definition cannot be racist, out of being ns either. They would talk a lot of nonsense in the course, and would wake up in the process some people who still have some working brain cells
    Ein Leben ist nichts, deine Sprosse sind alles
    Aller Sturm nimmt nichts, weil dein Wurzelgriff zu stark ist
    und endet meine Frist, weiss ich dass du noch da bist
    Gefürchtet von der Zeit, mein Baum, mein Stamm in Ewigkeit

    my signature

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    I've noticed for some time now that the Swastika is becoming something of a universal symbol for Nationalist groups. It’s good to see that its legacy lives on and, as many people have sympathy with the Mongolians, it may even be seen in a more favourable light by some (until the Zionist media puts them right, of course! )

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    Racial Assimilation

    Gods! So Racial Assimilation is what the Chinese do to make the universal Ultra-Peasant Class. I read in history at school that they used to invade, take the people and ‘assimilate’ them into their culture. What a scary way to obliterate entire races!

    Considering we fair folk are recessively gened, multiculturalism is the atomic bomb the dirty you know who’s always wanted against our beautiful and kind people. Multiculturalism destroys Nordic traits, culture and ‘brains’!

    To think, all that we as humans have struggled for and evolved into can be erased because of our genetic deficiency. I’m starting to see why Captain H wanted Nordic traits everywhere, to keep us alive! Our human race alive!

    It’s no wonder the scumbag owned media promote the living death out of Multiculural societies, we all lose. Honesty, ethics and compassion are all lost for greed, sleaze, self-obsession and over-breeding. It’s genetic man! Welcome into the devolution of humankind.

    Nationalists are great because they support kind people and support their own. Go Mongolia burn that sociopathic red flag!

    Sorry I’m new here, so am I going to get banned now for stating the obvious?

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    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum makes interesting note of just where Mongolians stood in the eyes of the Third Reich. “The Germans carried out systematic mass killings of persons […] and systematically selected from among Soviet prisoners of war persons perceived to have ‘Asian’ or ‘Mongolian’ characteristics in order to shoot them.” In another great irony, Weatherford noted, “the Germans […] considered the Mongols as the opposite to the Germans. They taught that the existence of retarded children among the Germans was a result of the rape of pure German women by Mongols during the invasion of the thirteenth century.”
    Maybe the German National Socialists of that period weren't too far off huh???

    If they're interested in preserving their peoples integrity why don't they choose a symbol of their own?

    Just seems pretty stupid to me to blindly copy someone else when you have absolutely no connection to that group whatsoever except as an enemy to be executed on sight if captured or shot/bayoneted/blown up in battle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary in TX View Post
    Maybe the German National Socialists of that period weren't too far off huh???

    If they're interested in preserving their peoples integrity why don't they choose a symbol of their own?

    Just seems pretty stupid to me to blindly copy someone else when you have absolutely no connection to that group whatsoever except as an enemy to be executed on sight if captured or shot/bayoneted/blown up in battle.
    Well the swastika is pretty universal, I'm not sure however if the Mongolians have any connection to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Méldmir View Post
    Well the swastika is pretty universal, I'm not sure however if the Mongolians have any connection to it.
    According to this they don't really have any connection to it at all.

    Historical Use Of The Swastika In The East (*Click*)

    So supposedly the Chinese actually have more of a historical connection to it (along with the Hindus, the Buddhists, those of the Bön faith in Tibet as well as the Cao Dai of Vietnam).

    The Mongol people aren't mentioned at all.

    So actually their enemies that they want out of their country have more of a right to use it than they do.

    See what I mean? :

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    This is so funny. How do they even tell other asians apart? I know I can't.

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