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Thread: The 100 Most Common Surnames in England

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    The 100 Most Common Surnames in England

    The 100 most common surnames in England, though the source describes them as the most common English surnames. But Patel (24), Khan (64), Singh (70), Begum (71), Ali (80) & Hussain (82), aren't even European let alone English. The following names appear to be Welsh: Jones (2), Williams (3), Davies (6), Evans (7), Morgan (39), Davis (45), Price (47), Griffiths (50), Powell (75), Owen (85), Lloyd (91). Kelly (52) & Murphy (60) are Irish. Campbell (83) & Murray (98) are Scottish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Æmeric View Post
    The 100 most common surnames in England, though the source describes them as the most common English surnames. But Patel (24), Khan (64), Singh (70), Begum (71), Ali (80) & Hussain (82), aren't even European let alone English. The following names appear to be Welsh: Jones (2), Williams (3), Davies (6), Evans (7), Morgan (39), Davis (45), Price (47), Griffiths (50), Powell (75), Owen (85), Lloyd (91). Kelly (52) & Murphy (60) are Irish. Campbell (83) & Murray (98) are Scottish.
    That merely signifies that the English have traditionally depended on others economically, rather than themselves. The cost for this is necessarily approximated in future representative population.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Æmeric View Post
    The 100 most common surnames in England, though the source describes them as the most common English surnames. But Patel (24), Khan (64), Singh (70), Begum (71), Ali (80) & Hussain (82), aren't even European let alone English. The following names appear to be Welsh: Jones (2), Williams (3), Davies (6), Evans (7), Morgan (39), Davis (45), Price (47), Griffiths (50), Powell (75), Owen (85), Lloyd (91). Kelly (52) & Murphy (60) are Irish. Campbell (83) & Murray (98) are Scottish.
    The problem with British names is that many of them have more than one origin. Davis and Williams aren't even predominantly, much less exclusively Welsh. Jones, Davies and Price, though more common in Wales, also have English origins in many cases.

    The main reason Muslim/Indian and Welsh names rank so high is that both groups simply have less variety in their names than the English. Probably 50% of Welsh are called Jones, Evans or Morgan, which explains why Welsh names are higher than Irish, even though Irish heritage is more common in England.

    Most English are realistically going to have small amounts of other British nationalities in their ancestry. In some places (London and Lancashire) it's significantly more than the national average. But elsewhere, it's not overwhelmingly high.

    Here are all the names in my ancestry:

    Allen -- English
    Barber -- English
    Bates -- English
    Boothroide -- English, Yorkshire
    Borrett -- English, Norfolk
    Bramah -- English, Yorkshire
    Brooke -- English, Yorkshire
    Brotherton -- English, Yorkshire
    Bucktrout -- English, Yorkshire
    Butler -- English
    Clayton -- English, Yorkshire
    Davis -- English
    Day -- English
    Denton -- English
    Dibb -- English, Yorkshire
    Fox -- English
    Ganly -- Irish
    Gledhill -- English, Yorkshire
    Grave -- English
    Griffiths -- Welsh
    Hall -- English
    Handley -- English
    Hardy -- English
    Hart -- English
    Holmes -- English
    Hopwood -- English, Lancashire
    Illingsworth -- English, Yorkshire
    Keighley -- English, Yorkshire
    Lancaster -- English, Lancashire
    Langster -- English
    Leach -- English
    Long -- English
    Lyon -- English
    Marsden -- English, Yorkshire
    Peace -- English, Yorkshire
    Potter -- English
    Prince -- English
    Pryer -- English
    Sutton -- English
    Ray -- English
    Renor -- English
    Reynolds -- English
    Robinson -- English, Yorkshire
    Sanderson -- English
    Saville -- English, Yorkshire
    Simpson -- English
    Scott -- Northern English/Scottish
    Shooter -- English, Yorkshire
    Smith -- English
    Spivey -- English, Yorkshire
    Spurling -- English, Norfolk
    Stephenson -- English
    Stoddart -- English, Northumbria
    Stones -- English
    Terry -- English
    Tiernan -- Irish
    Tingle -- English, Yorkshire
    Trever -- Not sure, maybe Welsh
    Turner -- English
    Wild -- English
    Willis -- English


    *The two Irish names came by way of my Irish great-grandmother. The two Welsh names just popped up, but their bearers weren't Welsh-born.

    I don't think I'm unrepresentative. I'd say foreign ancestry is lower in the English than most other european nations, and when it exists, it's almost always from other Britons and therefore no big deal.

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    I read that Davis is English and Davies is Welsh. It seems odd that so many people in England would have Welsh surnames, considering the massive difference of the two nations' populations. Or maybe most Welsh moved to England at some point?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Méldmir View Post
    I read that Davis is English and Davies is Welsh. It seems odd that so many people in England would have Welsh surnames, considering the massive difference of the two nations' populations. Or maybe most Welsh moved to England at some point?
    Yup, I think you're right on the Davis/Davies split.

    Indeed a lot of Welsh people migrated to England. Many families who have been in England several generations but can trace their ancestry back to Wales tend to dislike the English sadly. This can be particularly prevalent during rugby games...

    The Welsh rugby team tends to have a lot of players with the surnames - Thomas, Roberts, Edwards, Hughes, Lewis, Ellis, Jenkins.

    So I'm not sure if those are English names either. It's uncertain where some of these names have originated though.

    I'm surprised there's no McDonald, McAllister McSomething type name.

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    That merely signifies that the English have traditionally depended on others economically, rather than themselves.
    It signifies the opposite doesn't it, that immigrants have come to England for financial reasons.

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    Wikipedia

    List of most common surnames in:

    England

    Wales

    Scotland

    Northern Ireland

    Europe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Way of Deception View Post

    The Welsh rugby team tends to have a lot of players with the surnames - Thomas, Roberts, Edwards, Hughes, Lewis, Ellis, Jenkins.

    I can't access the site I used to use as a point of reference anymore, but when I could, it allowed me to view the geographical distribution of surnames in 1891 (generally, the older the census you use, the closer the name clusters around its point of origin), and also view the place of birth of each person with that name for each county.

    Roberts is definitely English. I found Roberts was more common in England than in Wales in 1891, and the vast majority of people with that name in Yorkshire (which is the only county I researched in detail) were Yorkshire-born, whereas the vast majority of Evans's, for example, were Welsh-born. If both were Welsh names, there should be roughly equal ratios of Welsh to English bearers within a given county for each name. Also, Roberts was one of the most common names in my school, even rivaling bona fide Yorkshire names like Firth and Whittaker. Jones was nowhere near.

    More Hughes in Yorkshire were Irish-born than Welsh-born, according to the 1891 census, despite its being a Welsh name. Collins is Irish. I'm fairly sure I remember Ellis being English. Thomas is definitely Welsh. Lewis, Edwards, Richards, Charles etc. I think can be either. If those names are unusual in your county, then you're probably as likely to trace them to a Welsh ancestor as to an English ancestor from a county where the name is more common.

    When researching names, it's important to put your own work in too. Most genealogical sites (at least the free ones) are generally very lazy and often inaccurately report the origin of a name, or only partially report it. Most sites will tell you, for example, that Simpson is a Scottish name, when the fact is it's both a Scottish AND Northern English name, and most Northern English Simpsons aren't of direct Scottish descent at all. They'll also usually tell you a name is from X if it fits a common pattern common to X (like 'given name' + 's' naturally being assumed to be Welsh) even if it's not necessarily true.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamar Fox View Post
    The problem with British names is that many of them have more than one origin. Davis and Williams aren't even predominantly, much less exclusively Welsh. Jones, Davies and Price, though more common in Wales, also have English origins in many cases.

    The main reason Muslim/Indian and Welsh names rank so high is that both groups simply have less variety in their names than the English. Probably 50% of Welsh are called Jones, Evans or Morgan, which explains why Welsh names are higher than Irish, even though Irish heritage is more common in England.

    Most English are realistically going to have small amounts of other British nationalities in their ancestry. In some places (London and Lancashire) it's significantly more than the national average. But elsewhere, it's not overwhelmingly high.

    Here are all the names in my ancestry:

    Allen -- English
    Barber -- English
    Bates -- English
    Boothroide -- English, Yorkshire
    Borrett -- English, Norfolk
    Bramah -- English, Yorkshire
    Brooke -- English, Yorkshire
    Brotherton -- English, Yorkshire
    Bucktrout -- English, Yorkshire
    Butler -- English
    Clayton -- English, Yorkshire
    Davis -- English
    Day -- English
    Denton -- English
    Dibb -- English, Yorkshire
    Fox -- English
    Ganly -- Irish
    Gledhill -- English, Yorkshire
    Grave -- English
    Griffiths -- Welsh
    Hall -- English
    Handley -- English
    Hardy -- English
    Hart -- English
    Holmes -- English
    Hopwood -- English, Lancashire
    Illingsworth -- English, Yorkshire
    Keighley -- English, Yorkshire
    Lancaster -- English, Lancashire
    Langster -- English
    Leach -- English
    Long -- English
    Lyon -- English
    Marsden -- English, Yorkshire
    Peace -- English, Yorkshire
    Potter -- English
    Prince -- English
    Pryer -- English
    Sutton -- English
    Ray -- English
    Renor -- English
    Reynolds -- English
    Robinson -- English, Yorkshire
    Sanderson -- English
    Saville -- English, Yorkshire
    Simpson -- English
    Scott -- Northern English/Scottish
    Shooter -- English, Yorkshire
    Smith -- English
    Spivey -- English, Yorkshire
    Spurling -- English, Norfolk
    Stephenson -- English
    Stoddart -- English, Northumbria
    Stones -- English
    Terry -- English
    Tiernan -- Irish
    Tingle -- English, Yorkshire
    Trever -- Not sure, maybe Welsh
    Turner -- English
    Wild -- English
    Willis -- English


    *The two Irish names came by way of my Irish great-grandmother. The two Welsh names just popped up, but their bearers weren't Welsh-born.

    I don't think I'm unrepresentative. I'd say foreign ancestry is lower in the English than most other european nations, and when it exists, it's almost always from other Britons and therefore no big deal.
    This source believes the surname "Trever" is either Cornish or Welsh therefore you are pretty much correct: http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?name=Trever

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