Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Whiteness in Latin America

  1. #1
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Æmeric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Ancestry
    Britain, Ulster, Germany, America
    Subrace
    Dalofaelid+Baltid/Borreby
    Y-DNA
    R-Z19
    mtDNA
    U5a2c
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Indiana Indiana
    Gender
    Age
    57
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    Anti-Obama
    Religion
    Conservative Protestantism
    Posts
    6,269
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    571
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    519
    Thanked in
    227 Posts

    Whiteness in Latin America

    What is considered White in Latin America is very differnt from the historical Anglo-American norm. This is an issue in the US because of the growing Hispanic population (now 15%, primarily because of immgration) & the way it skews official government statistics. For example, 74% of the Us population is "White" but when you realize that this includes Mestizos & persons with significant African heritage you know this is not a reliable figure. When trying to figure out actually US demographic numbers you have to look at the non-Hispanic White numbers to gage the actual racial situation. Non-Hispanic Whites make up 66% of the population in America. What complicates matters is that Hispanic is not a racial catagory but a meta-ethnicity created by the US Census Bureau back in the 1970s.

    Puerto Ricans are a good example of the deluting of American Whiteness. 80% of Puerto Ricans claim to White racially. But Y chromosome & MtDNA testing disputes those facts:

    Thus the results of the genetic survey were surprising. While modern Puerto Ricans are genetically African to the tune of 27% of mtDNAs, only about 12% of mtDNA was derived from Europeans. Hence the authors concluded that the dominant population element in Puerto Rico (around 61%) was derived from Amerinds.Since the colonial history of the Caribbean and Puerto Rico in particular is fairly well known, the further conclusion was that the Amerind genes were TAINO in origin, since that is the name of the Indians who occupied Puerto Rico in early colonial times.

    Y chromosome & MtDNA can only trace 2 ancestoral lines, which double every generation further back in each persons pedigree, but it is useful in determining the racial component of a particular group, in this case Puerto Ricans. Overall Puerto Ricans would seem to be 41% Caucasian (mainly Iberian & North African, 70% paternal & 12% maternal), 41% Amerindian (probably Taino) & 18% African (27% maternal & only 10 paternal).

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    Saturday, August 3rd, 2019 @ 04:05 AM
    Ethnicity
    Danish
    Subrace
    Don't know
    Country
    Australia Australia
    State
    Western Australia Western Australia
    Gender
    Age
    31
    Family
    Single
    Politics
    NS
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    90
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    This seems to be true throughout Latin America. I wonder if the US will move in this direction. People who are half-white and half-Asian or half-Hispanic often marry whites- are their children going to consider themselves white,* or be considered white by most people? In many, if not most, cases, yes- like it or not.
    100 years ago the US was the opposite- it had the "one-drop rule" for African ancestry, and a clear preference for Northwestern European "Nordics" over Mediterranean Europeans.

    *These folks will probably consider themselves white out of convenience/indifference more than out of wanting to be white or being proud of their white ancestry.

  3. #3
    Senior Member rainman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Last Online
    Sunday, February 28th, 2010 @ 05:34 PM
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Ancestry
    Scotch-Irish, Welsh, English, Dutch, German, French
    Subrace
    Alpine-Nordic mix
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Ohio Ohio
    Location
    ohio
    Gender
    Family
    Single, looking
    Politics
    Libertarian/Tribalist
    Religion
    Asatru
    Posts
    1,310
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts
    The only real whites in south america are nazi racists. All the rest interbred with the melting pot. I see this as the future racial make up of America. Of course they live seperately from the rest of society in their own communities.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    Saturday, August 3rd, 2019 @ 04:05 AM
    Ethnicity
    Danish
    Subrace
    Don't know
    Country
    Australia Australia
    State
    Western Australia Western Australia
    Gender
    Age
    31
    Family
    Single
    Politics
    NS
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    90
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Fair number of people of entirely European descent in Latin America are members of religious minorities that only marry within themselves (e.g. Mennonites and Russian Old Believers). Others are people whose families are recent arrivals- 2 or 3 generations in the region, and/or living in urban areas such as Buenos Aires and Montevideo since arrival.
    I think some German descendants in Brazil and Argentina look down on whites of Italian or Portuguese descent.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    Friday, April 19th, 2019 @ 06:24 PM
    Ethnicity
    American
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Massachusetts Massachusetts
    Location
    Boston
    Gender
    Age
    43
    Family
    Having a longtime compani
    Occupation
    bartender
    Politics
    conservative
    Religion
    agnostic
    Posts
    190
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    When I lived in the New York and New Jersey area, I was told by a Chilean woman that most of the people in her country were a mixture of Spanish, Italian, and German. According to a Brazilian lady I once knew, people in the southern part of Brazil are either Portugese, or German. She told me there are towns down there that are entirely German. There's a Brazilian celebrity by the name of Xhu Xha who is quite Nordic in appearance who once dated J.F.K. Jr.
    Remember that Latin Americans are currently much more racist, as our society defines the term, than Anglo-American society is. If you tune in to Latin American television, most of their actresses are quite Nordish looking. A natural blonde European or American wife is supposed to be a status symbol in those countries. They're referred to as "plant wives" since all they have to do is sit around like house plants, and be natural blondes; nothing more.
    I think what we're seeing in Latin America, and to a certain degree in South Africa will eventually occur in North America and perhaps Europe. You're going to see tiny, isolated, White enclaves. Who knows what will happen from there?

  6. #6
    A.K.A. Autobahn
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    frippardthree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Last Online
    Thursday, April 12th, 2012 @ 09:59 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    Germany, Gaul, England, Austria, Canada
    Subrace
    Paleo-Atlantid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Ohio Ohio
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Religion
    Christianity
    Posts
    1,662
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts
    I had always assumed that "Latinos" were all a mixture of Asian, Black, Native American, Jewish, and Caucasian. Here are excerpts of some "Web-Articles" which may or may not be of interest. I will also put my two cents in, and warn you that the article from "Source Watch.Com" seems to be very liberally biased!

    Black denial
    By Frances Robles


    Nearly all Dominican women straighten their hair, which experts say is a direct result of a historical learned rejection of all things black

    SANTO DOMINGO -- Yara Matos sat still while long, shiny locks from China were fastened, bit by bit, to her coarse hair.

    Not that Matos has anything against her natural curls, even though Dominicans call that pelo malo -- bad hair.

    But a professional Dominican woman just should not have bad hair, she said. "If you're working in a bank, you don't want some barrio-looking hair. Straight hair looks elegant," the bank teller said. "It's not that as a person of color I want to look white. I want to look pretty."

    And to many in the Dominican Republic, to look pretty is to look less black.

    Dominican hairdressers are internationally known for the best hair-straightening techniques. Store shelves are lined with rows of skin whiteners, hair relaxers and extensions.

    Racial identification here is thorny and complex, defined not so much by skin color but by the texture of your hair, the width of your nose and even the depth of your pocket. The richer, the "whiter." And, experts say, it is fueled by a rejection of anything black.

    "I always associated black with ugly. I was too dark and didn't have nice hair," said Catherine de la Rosa, a dark-skinned Dominican-American college student spending a semester here. "With time passing, I see I'm not black. I'm Latina.

    "At home in New York everyone speaks of color of skin. Here, it's not about skin color. It's culture."
    Full Article:http://www.latinamericanpost.com/ind...c=39&conn=4969

    History of Japanese Latin American oppression
    From December 1941 to February 1948, the U.S. government orchestrated and financed the mass abduction and forcible deportation of 2,264 men, women, and children of Japanese ancestry from 13 Latin American countries to be used as hostages in exchange for Americans held by Japan. Over 800 Japanese Latin Americans were included in two prisoner of war exchanges between the U.S. and Japan. The remaining Japanese Latin Americans were imprisoned without due process of law in U.S. Department of Justice internment camps until after the end of the war.

    Stripped of their passports en route to the U.S. and declared “illegal aliens”, most of the incarcerated Japanese Latin Americans were forced to leave the U.S. after their release from camp. However, since many were barred from returning to their home countries, more than 900 Japanese Latin Americans were deported to war devastated Japan. Over 350 Japanese Latin Americans remained in the U.S. and fought deportation in the courts. Eventually, about 100 were able to return to Latin America. It was not until 1952 that those who stayed were allowed to begin the process of becoming U.S. permanent residents. Many later became U.S. citizens.
    Full Article:http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php...S._legislation

    Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Latin Americans of Japanese Descent Act of 2007

    Although the internment experience itself took place over sixty years ago, the issue of redress for Japanese Latin Americans still gets attention today. The unwillingness of the Japanese Latin American people to accept historical silencing can be seen in their current activities in the political sphere.

    Members of Congress have put together a bill "to establish a fact-finding Commission to extend the study of a prior Commission to investigate and determine facts and circumstances surrounding the relocation, internment, and deportation to Axis countries of Latin Americans of Japanese descent from December 1941 through February 1948, and the impact of those actions by the United States, and to recommend appropriate remedies, and for other purposes." [2]

    A coalition of senators, both Republican and Democrat, are currently urging Congress to create a bill reinvigorating the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians previously set up by Congress in 1980. The commission would have the power to hold public hearings, receive evidence and give testimony or be able to recommend remedies based on its findings. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii) has introduced a bill in the 110th Congress that would establish a commission that would determine the facts and circumstances involving the relocation, internment and deportation of Japanese Latin Americans.[3] The bill, the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Latin Americans of Japanese Descent Act (S.381) is cosponsored by Sens. Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii), Robert Bennett (R-Utah), Joseph Biden (D-Del.), Thomas Carper (D-Del.), Russ Feingold (D-Wisc.), Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Carl Levin (D-Mich.), Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.), Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Ted Stevens (R-Alaska). [4
    Full Article:http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php...S._legislation

    New Study Published in CANCER Supports Use of BRACAnalysis Testing Across Broad Ethnic Populations

    Women of Asian, African and Latin American Ancestry Had Similar Risk of Carrying BRCA Mutations as Those With Western European Ancestry

    SALT LAKE CITY, UT, Apr 30, 2009 (MARKET WIRE via COMTEX News Network) -- Myriad Genetics, Inc. (NASDAQ: MYGN) announced today that an article entitled "BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Women of Different Ethnicities Undergoing Testing for Hereditary Breast-Ovarian Cancer" will appear in the May 15, 2009 issue of the journal CANCER. The study demonstrates that BRACAnalysis(R) testing of at-risk women across diverse ethnicities helps identify individuals who may benefit from improved surveillance, medical and surgical strategies to reduce their hereditary cancer risks.

    "This study, the largest of its kind, shows convincingly that strong family or personal history of breast or ovarian cancer is associated with a high prevalence of BRCA mutations -- irrespective of one's ethnic heritage," stated Gregory C. Critchfield, M.D., M.S., President of Myriad Genetic Laboratories.

    The association between ethnicity and the risk of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations has not been well understood in women of non-European ancestry. This study provides important information for women of Asian, African, Latin American and Native American ancestry that may impact breast cancer prevention and treatment efforts among women in these populations. The study, performed by researchers at Philadelphia's Fox Chase Cancer Center and Myriad Genetics, Inc., analyzed the prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutations in patients of different ethnicities at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. The study included test results of 46,276 women during the ten-year period from 1996 to 2006. Study subjects encompassed a broad, diverse ethnic group, including individuals of European, Latin American, African, Asian and Native American ancestries. To date, this work represents the largest group of patients tested for BRCA mutations reported in the literature. All testing was performed at Myriad Genetics, Inc.

    Results of the study showed that BRCA disease-causing mutations were identified in 5,780 women tested (12.5%) across all ethnic populations. Importantly, the study demonstrated that individuals of African and Latin American ancestry had as great a risk in having BRCA mutations as women with western European ancestry, when controlled for the level of personal and family history of breast and ovarian cancer.

    Professional medical society guidelines, such as the American Society of Clinical Oncologists (ASCO), the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO), and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), articulate risk factors for BRCA gene mutations, which include, among others, breast cancer occurring before age 50, personal or family history of ovarian cancer at any age, personal or family history of male breast cancer, Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry with breast cancer at any age, or the presence of a known BRCA mutation in the family.
    Full Article:http://investor.myriad.com/releasede...leaseID=381016

    Terms used within Latin America which pertain to black heritage include mulato (black - white mixture), and zambo (indigenous - black mixture) and moreno. Mestizo refers to an indigenous - white mixture. The term mestizaje refers to the intermixing or fusing of races, whether by mere custom or deliberate policy. In Latin America this happened extensively between all the racial groups and cultures, but usually involved European men and indigenous and African women. Unions of white females and non-white males were almost taboo.

    These distinctive terms were used in part to distinguish between different social strata in which the Europeans and criollos (people of pure European heritage born in the Americas) who generally were the ruling and administrative parties were at the top, and the African and Indian races who were the laboring class were at the bottom. The offspring of mixed marriages generally occupied a status closer to that of the father's, thereby putting children with a black or Indian father at a disadvantage.
    Retrieved From:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afro-La...c_distinctions

    The 1861 census recorded 541 Latin Americans resident in the UK. This increased to 778 in 1871 but had fallen to 638 by 1901.[2] The current size of the Latin American population in the UK is highly debatable. According to the 2001 UK Census, 76,412 UK residents were born in South America and 8,827 in 'Other North America',[3] which includes Central America (but also Greenland),[4] bringing the Latin American-born population in 2001 to around 85,000.

    Recent estimates suggest that there may now be in excess of 1,000,000 Latin American Britons, although these are described as "guesstimates" and rely largely on embassy estimates.[5] These estimates state that there may be some 200,000 Brazilians in the UK (with others suggesting that there are around 60,000 Brazilians in London alone).[6] However, recent Office for National Statistics estimates are lower, suggesting that there were 56,000 Brazilian-born people living in the UK in 2008. No other Latin American-born group features in the top 60 foreign countries of birth, meaning that they each have fewer than 20,000 members.
    Retrieved From:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_American_Briton

    So, who has said that: "Puerto Rico has sometimes been said to have a "White" majority, an extinct Amerindian population, persons of mixed ancestry, Africans and a small Asian minority"

    I remember in school always talking about us puerto ricans been all of mixed ancestry, spanish, african and taino. Any comments? It is true that many puerto ricans see themselves as whites, but if you ask them they will also accept their mixed ancestry, and when the say white they just mean the color of their skin.

    Cjrs 79 03:43, August 16, 2005 (UTC)

    I agree that most Puerto Ricans consider themselves of mixed ancestry and studies have supported this belief [1]. The reason Puerto Ricans are said to have a white majority is because the answers for question #6 of the 2000 Census [2] ("What is this person's race"?) did not include Puerto Rican or even Latin. Since the right answer for the question was not found Puerto Ricans answered they were white beacuse the other options where really far from the truth. --Joelito 13:06, 16 August 2005 (UTC)

    Most Puerto Ricans are white, due to the constant spanish immgration long after the colony was turned over the the US , people who live on the Island will say the same also. the whole mixture thing is debated but many have said that Puerto Rican people living on the island still are of white or mostly white decent. —Preceding unsigned comment added by XXGustaXX (talk • contribs) 20 Sep 2005

    white (mostly Spanish origin) 80.5%, black 8%, Amerindian 0.4%, Asian 0.2%, mixed and other 10.9%
    Retrieved From:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talkuerto_Rico/Archive_01#Demographics

    Mexico Genealogy 101
    Tracing Your Family Tree in Mexico
    By Kimberly Powell, About.com

    Due to hundreds of years of meticulous record-keeping, Mexico offers a wealth of church and civil records for the genealogical and historical researcher. It is also the homeland of one in every 10 Americans. Learn more about your Mexican heritage, with these steps for tracing your family tree in Mexico.
    Mexico has a rich history stretching back to ancient times. Archaeology sites around the country speak of ancient civilizations flourishing in what is present-day Mexico thousands of years before the arrival of the first Europeans, such as the Olmec, thought by some to be the mother culture of Mesoamerican civilization, who lived around 1200 to 800 BC, and the Maya of the Yucatan Peninsula who flourished from about 250 BC.

    Spanish Rule
    During the early 15th century the fierce Aztecs rose to power, maintaining dominance over the region until they were defeated in 1519 by Hernan Cortes and his group of just over 900 Spanish explorers. Called "New Spain," the territory then came under control of the Spanish Crown.
    Spanish kings encouraged the exploration of new lands by granting conquistadors the right to establish settlements in exchange for one-fifth (el quinto real, the royal fifth) of any treasure discovered.
    The colony of New Spain rapidly outgrew the initial borders of the Aztec Empire, encompassing all of present-day Mexico, as well as Central America (as far south as Costa Rica), and much of the present-day southwest United States, including all or parts of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Utah and Wyoming.

    Spanish Society
    The Spanish continued to rule over most of Mexico until 1821 when Mexico achieved status as an independent country. During that time, the availability of inexpensive land attracted other Spanish immigrants who sought the social status afforded to land owners by Spanish society at that time. These permanent settlers gave rise to four distinct social classes:
    Peninsulars, or the ruling class, were people born in Spain or Portugal. To maintain the line, some men sent their wives back to Spain to give birth, to ensure that their children also achieved "peninsular" status.

    Peninsulars, or the ruling class, were people born in Spain or Portugal. To maintain the line, some men sent their wives back to Spain to give birth, to ensure that their children also achieved "peninsular" status.

    Criollos were people of pure Spanish descent who were born in New Spain. It was this group, with the support of mestizos and other lower classes, that initiated the 11 years of rebellion to claim independence for Mexico in 1821, in response to increasing taxes and regulations by the Crown.

    Mestizos were people of mixed blood (generally used to identify Spanish/Indian ancestry) who ranked lower than the criollos in New Spain’s social hierarchy. Most Mexicans today (more than 65%) are descended from this group.

    Indigenas are the native Indians of Mexico. Prior to Mexican independence, several classifications were commonly used by the Spanish to identify people with Indian ancestry, including: indio (Indian), mestizo (half Indian/half white), zambo (half-Indian/half African) and lobo (three-quarters African/one-quarter Indian).

    While Mexico has welcomed many other immigrants to its shores, the majority of its population descends from the Spanish, the Indians, or are of mixed Spanish and Indian heritage (mestizos). Blacks and some Asians are also part of the Mexican population.
    Full Article:http://genealogy.about.com/od/mexico/a/records.htm


  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    Saturday, August 3rd, 2019 @ 04:05 AM
    Ethnicity
    Danish
    Subrace
    Don't know
    Country
    Australia Australia
    State
    Western Australia Western Australia
    Gender
    Age
    31
    Family
    Single
    Politics
    NS
    Religion
    Heathen
    Posts
    90
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by flemish View Post
    When I lived in the New York and New Jersey area, I was told by a Chilean woman that most of the people in her country were a mixture of Spanish, Italian, and German. According to a Brazilian lady I once knew, people in the southern part of Brazil are either Portugese, or German. She told me there are towns down there that are entirely German. There's a Brazilian celebrity by the name of Xhu Xha who is quite Nordic in appearance who once dated J.F.K. Jr.
    Remember that Latin Americans are currently much more racist, as our society defines the term, than Anglo-American society is. If you tune in to Latin American television, most of their actresses are quite Nordish looking. A natural blonde European or American wife is supposed to be a status symbol in those countries. They're referred to as "plant wives" since all they have to do is sit around like house plants, and be natural blondes; nothing more.
    I think what we're seeing in Latin America, and to a certain degree in South Africa will eventually occur in North America and perhaps Europe. You're going to see tiny, isolated, White enclaves. Who knows what will happen from there?
    Most Chileans, at least poor and middle-class ones, have some Amerindian ancestry as well as European ancestry. Like Argentina and Uruguay, most Chileans have ancestors who immigrated after independence.
    As for Latin American TV, sounds different from US TV- you do not see blondes playing Latinas because no one would believe it. Most of the Latina actresses and entertainers we see in the US are Mediterranean-type Caucasians (e.g. Cote de Pablo, Shakira) or light-skinned Mestizo types (e.g. Eva Longoria).

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 1 Day Ago, 05:22 AM
  2. German Immigration and Adaptation to Latin America
    By Siebenbürgerin in forum Germanic Diaspora, Enclaves, & Influences
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sunday, June 19th, 2016, 11:08 AM
  3. Replies: 6
    Last Post: Tuesday, July 27th, 2010, 04:13 AM
  4. Racial classifications in Latin America
    By Mercator in forum Physical Anthropology
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: Tuesday, August 8th, 2006, 06:46 PM
  5. Racial Composition of Latin America
    By Conquistador in forum Physical Anthropology
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Monday, February 10th, 2003, 02:07 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •