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Thread: Mitochondrial DNA of Russians and neighbouring people

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    Post Mitochondrial DNA of Russians and neighbouring people

    Mitochondrial DNA variability in Poles and Russians.

    Malyarchuk BA, Grzybowski T, Derenko MV, Czarny J, Wozniak M, Miscicka-Sliwka D.

    Institute of Biological Problems of the North, Russian Academy of Sciences, Portovaya str. 18, 685000 Magadan, Russia. mderenko@mail.ru

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation was examined in Poles (from the Pomerania-Kujawy region; n = 436) and Russians (from three different regions of the European part of Russia; n = 201), for which the two hypervariable segments (HVS I and HVS II) and haplogroup-specific coding region sites were analyzed. The use of mtDNA coding region RFLP analysis made it possible to distinguish parallel mutations that occurred at particular sites in the HVS I and II regions during mtDNA evolution. In total, parallel mutations were identified at 73 nucleotide sites in HVS I (17.8%) and 31 sites in HVS II (7.73%). The classification of mitochondrial haplotypes revealed the presence of all major European haplogroups, which were characterized by similar patterns of distribution in Poles and Russians. An analysis of the distribution of the control region haplotypes did not reveal any specific combinations of unique mtDNA haplotypes and their subclusters that clearly distinguish both Poles and Russians from the neighbouring European populations. The only exception is a novel subcluster U4a within subhaplogroup U4, defined by a diagnostic mutation at nucleotide position 310 in HVS II. This subcluster was found in common predominantly between Poles and Russians (at a frequency of 2.3% and 2.0%, respectively) and may therefore have a central-eastern European origin.

    PMID: 12418968 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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    Post Mitochondrial DNA variability in Russians and Ukrainians

    Mitochondrial DNA variability in Russians and Ukrainians: implication to the origin of the Eastern Slavs.

    Malyarchuk BA, Derenko MV.

    Institute of Biological Problems of the North, Magadan, Russia. ibpn@online.magadan.su

    In order to investigate the origin of the Eastern Slavs, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation was examined in Russians and Ukrainians by hypervariable segment I (HVS I) sequencing and restriction analysis of the haplogroup-specific sites. No significant differences were found for Russians and Ukrainians when compared to other Europeans - in fact, they fall within the range of gene diversity seen throughout Europe and exhibit the unimodal pattern of pairwise sequence differences. Moreover, HVS I sequences in the Russians and Ukrainians are similar or identical to those found in eastern and western European populations. Despite the small genetic distances between Europeans, phylogenetic analysis reveals a considerable heterogeneity of Eastern Slavonic populations - they do not cluster together onto a phylogenetic tree. Analysis of distribution of rare HVS I types shared between populations of Eastern Slavs and other West Eurasians has shown that Russians share rare haplotypes mainly with Germans and Finno-Ugric populations. Of these, subhaplogroup H1 sequence types, which are defined by different combinations of nucleotides 16192T, 16294T, 16304C, 16311C and 16320T, are found predominantly in common between Russians and German-speaking populations. The data obtained allow us to conclude that the Slavonic migrations in early Middle Ages from their putative homeland in central Europe to the east of Europe were accompanied mostly by the same mtDNA types characteristic for the pre-Slavonic populations of eastern Europe.

    PMID: 11415523 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    Last edited by Glenlivet; Wednesday, June 2nd, 2004 at 05:54 PM.

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    Post Mitochondrial DNA sequence diversity in Russians

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence diversity in Russians.

    Orekhov V, Poltoraus A, Zhivotovsky LA, Spitsyn V, Ivanov P, Yankovsky N.

    Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Moscow, Russia.

    The article presents the results of the first regular study of Russian populations by sequencing the control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The sequenced region is the most variable on mtDNA molecule and is commonly used for population and evolutionary studies. Russians form one of the largest ethnic groups (more than 129 million). However, their genetic diversity had only been characterized with RFLP and biochemical markers, although there are already established mtDNA sequence databases for many ethnic groups of the world. We have obtained sequence data from 103 individuals living in three Russian regions: Kostroma, Kursk, and Rjazan. The sequenced fragment analyzed is 360 bp in length (positions from 16024 to 16383). Fifty nine nucleotide positions have been found polymorphic in Russians, among those were 57 transitions and two transversions. One individual is found having two insertions of two cytosines between positions 16184 and 16193. Among 64 different mitotypes identified in the study 52 were unique in these samples. The index of genetic diversity (Nei, 1987) for Russians is 0.96. This value is within the established range for European populations (0.93 to 0.98). Genetic distances calculated from our data show that Russians form a cluster with Germans, Bulgarians, Swedes, Estonians, and Volgo-Finns are more distant from Karelians and Finns, and much more differ from Turks and especially Mongolians.

    PMID: 10069400 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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