View Poll Results: British English or American English, which do you prefer?

Voters
71. You may not vote on this poll
  • British English.

    31 43.66%
  • American English.

    24 33.80%
  • Another kind of English.

    6 8.45%
  • I've no preference.

    10 14.08%
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 46

Thread: British English or American English?

  1. #1
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Siebenbürgerin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    Transylvanian Saxon
    Subrace
    Alpinid/Baltid
    State
    Transylvania Transylvania
    Location
    Hermannstadt
    Gender
    Age
    33
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    Ethno-Cultural
    Religion
    Lutheran
    Posts
    2,736
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    216
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    414
    Thanked in
    204 Posts

    British English or American English?

    Which of them do you prefer? I've to say I like the sound of British English better, the accent seems nicer than the American one in my view.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mvbeleg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last Online
    Tuesday, April 10th, 2018 @ 03:45 AM
    Ethnicity
    American of German descent
    Ancestry
    Kingdom of Hanover, Pennsylvania Deitsch, Austrian Empire (Bohemia), Electorate of Hesse-Kassel
    Subrace
    Faelid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Tennessee Tennessee
    Location
    Great Appalachian Valley
    Gender
    Age
    36
    Politics
    Trumpism
    Religion
    Protestant (Raised)
    Posts
    188
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    You should probably disambiguate between American accents VS. British accents and American English VS. British English as written languages.

    Certain British accents are quite sophisticated sounding and pleasant to the ears. The posh ones sound pretentious. I prefer the American Midland and Philadelphia area accents. To me they have a plain and candid sounding quality.

    Here are some links related to the geography of the major accents divisions in the United States:

    http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atla.../TelsurIN.html

    http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atla...NE/Map1NE.html

    http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atla...psM/Map1M.html

    http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atla...psS/Map1S.html

    http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atla...psW/Map1W.html



    As for the written languages, the rules for American English are much stricter and better standardized. I prefer American English.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Stygian Cellarius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last Online
    Saturday, May 12th, 2012 @ 05:59 PM
    Ethnicity
    Celto-Germanic
    Ancestry
    England, Scotland, Germany, Ireland, Wales
    Subrace
    Sindarin
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Maryland Maryland
    Location
    Nargothrond
    Gender
    Age
    41
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Ontological Cryptanalyst
    Politics
    1011000
    Religion
    Spiritual Agnosticism
    Posts
    218
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    I cannot be 100% sure on this because I have not looked into it myself, but I once learned (From my German language teacher) that American English is closer to the original English language because it went through fewer language reforms than in Britain; Webster being the one and only language reform we've had in America after we split from England.
    So from that I would suspect American English follows the rules closer; being that (from what I've read personally regard old english, middle English etc.) there seems to be a correlation with the greater antiquity of English, the more it follows its rules. For example: just the other day I was reading the Canterbury Tales in Middle English and the few passages I read I noticed that every word with a long vowel had its associated "e" at the end. Something not strictly followed any longer. Granted some words today that were once spoken with a long vowel are spoken with a short vowel and therefore you would expect to see the "e" ending more often in old literature. But regardless, they still followed it, it seems without exception, whereas today there are exceptions.

    I wish we would go back to it and reform it further by limiting the letter "c" to the "ch" sound for example. All it's other sounds can be satisfied with a "k" or "s".

    My German teacher also said that English in itself (American or British) is closer to the original Germanic language that existed when German and English split. Once again due to the fact that German had more reforms than English. Which seems to be the case given that I can fairly easily read, say...Norwegian or Swedish (with zero training) than German (which required training).
    yDNA: R1a1a1
    mtDNA: H4a1
    Ancestry Painting: 100% European
    23andme Global Similarity: Dead center of English Cluster

  4. #4
    Senior Member Papa Koos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Last Online
    Saturday, October 24th, 2009 @ 01:54 AM
    Ethnicity
    German
    Gender
    Posts
    421
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by infratetraskelion View Post
    I cannot be 100% sure on this because I have not looked into it myself, but I once learned (From my German language teacher) that American English is closer to the original English language because it went through fewer language reforms than in Britain; Webster being the one and only language reform we've had in America after we split from England.
    So from that I would suspect American English follows the rules closer; being that (from what I've read personally regard old english, middle English etc.) there seems to be a correlation with the greater antiquity of English, the more it follows its rules. For example: just the other day I was reading the Canterbury Tales in Middle English and the few passages I read I noticed that every word with a long vowel had its associated "e" at the end. Something not strictly followed any longer. Granted some words today that were once spoken with a long vowel are spoken with a short vowel and therefore you would expect to see the "e" ending more often in old literature. But regardless, they still followed it, it seems without exception, whereas today there are exceptions.

    I wish we would go back to it and reform it further by limiting the letter "c" to the "ch" sound for example. All it's other sounds can be satisfied with a "k" or "s".

    My German teacher also said that English in itself (American or British) is closer to the original Germanic language that existed when German and English split. Once again due to the fact that German had more reforms than English. Which seems to be the case given that I can fairly easily read, say...Norwegian or Swedish (with zero training) than German (which required training).
    I wish we would go back to it and reform it further by limiting the letter "c" to the "ch" sound for example. All it's other sounds can be satisfied with a "k" or "s".

    I00% agreement here.

    I like British English more than the most prevalent mid-western American English (flat & boring). I call it "broadcast speak".

    I thoroughly enjoy Southern English as spoken by the folks in northern Mississippi (Good examples would be the writer William Faulkner and the historian Shelby Foote).

  5. #5
    Account Inactive
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Last Online
    Saturday, September 5th, 2009 @ 04:59 PM
    Ethnicity
    Scottish
    Ancestry
    Scottish
    Country
    England England
    State
    Yorkshire Yorkshire
    Gender
    Posts
    35
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    I'm amazed that there even exists a "British English"! I had been brought up to believe that there was English and American English.

  6. #6
    Senior Member triedandtru's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Online
    Wednesday, June 6th, 2012 @ 03:45 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    Germany
    Subrace
    Alpinid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    North Carolina North Carolina
    Location
    Southeastern Coast
    Gender
    Family
    Engaged
    Politics
    Not liberal
    Religion
    Blut und Boden
    Posts
    828
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    I do think it depends upon the accent and dialect. Grammatically correct and proper English sounds absolutely lovely and distinguished. Cockney, slang British hurts my ears more so than even the most incorrect use of grammar and ignorant-sounding Southern droll. Now a Southern accent with decently proper English is quite pleasant. So, again, I would say it greatly depends upon the speaker and which portion of America or Britain they are from.

  7. #7
    Lost in Melancholia
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Thusnelda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Bavarian tribe
    Ancestry
    Bavarian
    Subrace
    Nordid-Borreby
    State
    Bavaria Bavaria
    Location
    Over the hills and far away
    Gender
    Age
    34
    Occupation
    Breathing the forest
    Politics
    Regionalist-conservative
    Religion
    Ásatrú/Forn Siðr
    Posts
    4,380
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    37
    Thanked in
    26 Posts
    No harm intended, but for my German ears British English always sounds a little bit snooty and uppish. I know that there´re some different English dialects within Britain but I´m refering to the "typical" British English here, spoken by the Queen, by the BBC or even Mr. Bean for instance.

    American English hasn´t that "snooty" - some may call it sophisticated - touch. I consider it as more laid back and easygoing. But it´s just a personal and subjective preference, of course.

    "Judge of your natural character by what you do in your dreams" - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  8. #8
    Anachronism "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Huginn ok Muninn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Ancestry
    Germany, Norway, England
    Subrace
    Nordeby
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Texas Texas
    Gender
    Zodiac Sign
    Leo
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Farther right than you.
    Posts
    3,045
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    623
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    753
    Thanked in
    359 Posts
    I like listening to someone like Jeremy Clarkson from Top Gear, but despise listening to the chavvish yakking of thuggish lower class Brits. I guess that goes for thoughtless chatter in any accent or language.

  9. #9
    Account Inactive
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Last Online
    Saturday, September 5th, 2009 @ 04:59 PM
    Ethnicity
    Scottish
    Ancestry
    Scottish
    Country
    England England
    State
    Yorkshire Yorkshire
    Gender
    Posts
    35
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Okay, I've just returned from reading about the evolution of the English language and I can't recall there being a section where British became English and vice versa.

    Could the title of the thread please be changed. It is so offensively ignorant of more than one section of the Germanic world, it is unreal!

  10. #10
    Senior Member triedandtru's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Online
    Wednesday, June 6th, 2012 @ 03:45 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    Germany
    Subrace
    Alpinid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    North Carolina North Carolina
    Location
    Southeastern Coast
    Gender
    Family
    Engaged
    Politics
    Not liberal
    Religion
    Blut und Boden
    Posts
    828
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by BritishWitch View Post
    I'm amazed that there even exists a "British English"! I had been brought up to believe that there was English and American English.
    I think it should make sense that Brit would be brought up to understand that there is English and American English, just as an American would be brought up to believe there to be a British English and American English.

    Quote Originally Posted by Valkyrie View Post
    No harm intended, but for my German ears British English always sounds a little bit snooty and uppish. I know that there´re some different English dialects within Britain but I´m refering to the "typical" British English here, spoken by the Queen, by the BBC or even Mr. Bean for instance.

    American English hasn´t that "snooty" - some may call it sophisticated - touch. I consider it as more laid back and easygoing. But it´s just a personal and subjective preference, of course.
    I have heard another German speaker describe British English this way. Then again, they were not very fond of the English.

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. How Much Are the British (Especially English) Related to Other Germanics?
    By BritishLad in forum Questions About Germanics
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: Saturday, March 18th, 2017, 09:21 PM
  2. The Beatles Were a British Not an English Band
    By Witta in forum Music & Hymns
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Wednesday, November 18th, 2009, 12:21 PM
  3. Did the English/British Circumcise?
    By Frans_Jozef in forum History
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Wednesday, November 16th, 2005, 07:20 PM
  4. Did the English/British Circumcise?
    By Frans_Jozef in forum England
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Friday, October 8th, 2004, 02:49 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •