View Poll Results: In your view, should voting be compulsory?

Voters
32. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, for all citizens, in all circumstances.

    4 12.50%
  • Only in special situations, if the voting turnout is too low.

    1 3.13%
  • No, because it undermines the idea of democracy and freedom.

    12 37.50%
  • No, because I don't believe in voting.

    5 15.63%
  • No, for other reason. - Please name it.

    7 21.88%
  • I've an other view.

    3 9.38%
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Thread: Should Non-Voters Be Fined? Should Voting Be Compulsory?

  1. #21
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    No, because I'm pretty sure it would make things even worse for us, as the majority of people who don't bother to vote are deadbeats that tend to be liberal anyhow.

  2. #22
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    Some food for thought:

    Vote all you want. The secret government won’t change.

    THE VOTERS WHO put Barack Obama in office expected some big changes. From the NSA’s warrantless wiretapping to Guantanamo Bay to the Patriot Act, candidate Obama was a defender of civil liberties and privacy, promising a dramatically different approach from his predecessor.

    But six years into his administration, the Obama version of national security looks almost indistinguishable from the one he inherited. Guantanamo Bay remains open. The NSA has, if anything, become more aggressive in monitoring Americans. Drone strikes have escalated. Most recently it was reported that the same president who won a Nobel Prize in part for promoting nuclear disarmament is spending up to $1 trillion modernizing and revitalizing America’s nuclear weapons.

    Why did the face in the Oval Office change but the policies remain the same? Critics tend to focus on Obama himself, a leader who perhaps has shifted with politics to take a harder line. But Tufts University political scientist Michael J. Glennon has a more pessimistic answer: Obama couldn’t have changed policies much even if he tried.

    Though it’s a bedrock American principle that citizens can steer their own government by electing new officials, Glennon suggests that in practice, much of our government no longer works that way. In a new book, “National Security and Double Government,” he catalogs the ways that the defense and national security apparatus is effectively self-governing, with virtually no accountability, transparency, or checks and balances of any kind. He uses the term “double government”: There’s the one we elect, and then there’s the one behind it, steering huge swaths of policy almost unchecked. Elected officials end up serving as mere cover for the real decisions made by the bureaucracy.

    Glennon cites the example of Obama and his team being shocked and angry to discover upon taking office that the military gave them only two options for the war in Afghanistan: The United States could add more troops, or the United States could add a lot more troops. Hemmed in, Obama added 30,000 more troops.
    More: https://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/20...9sL/story.html

  3. #23
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    I oppose compulsory voting. If a person can't be bothered to vote on his own, his vote will be an uninformed one and likely won't be in the best interests of the country. For societies valuing freedom, it's also contradictory. If the citizenry cannot be trusted to decide whether or not to vote, why should they be trusted with their own governance at all?

    Of course, this is not to advocate abstention from voting. It is our most fundamental tool to influence our government, and a responsible populace will use it to its fullest. But one that doesn't is already well on its way to losing that right anyway, and forcing them to do so will not affect the underlying apathy and ignorance at fault.

  4. #24
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    I believe only INTJs and ENTJs with an IQ over 120 should be allowed to vote.

    That would still be a few tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands voters, depending on the countries.

    This is how some ancient democracies functioned, by selecting a college of voters among the general population. Giving the right to vote to every Tom, Dick and Harry like we do now doesn't make sense at all.

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