View Poll Results: How Do You Pronounce "th" in the English Language?

Voters
33. You may not vote on this poll
  • Like the "s" in "sat".

    4 12.12%
  • Like the "z" in "zen".

    0 0%
  • Like the "d" in "dam".

    7 21.21%
  • Another way. (specify it please!)

    22 66.67%
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Thread: How Do You Pronounce "th" in the English Language?

  1. #1
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    How Do You Pronounce "th" in the English Language?

    Based on this post here (http://forums.skadi.net/showpost.php...3&postcount=16), I'm curious how the foreign speakers of the English language pronounce the "th" in the word "that", for example. I pronounce it like the "s" in "sat", but I've heard peoples pronouncing it differently, like the "z" in "zen" or like the "d" in "dam".

    PS. A little funny video on German pronunciation.

    German pronunciation video

  2. #2
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    I pronounce it like the "s" in "sat". One of my former English teachers has always criticized that I can´t pronounce the "th" ("tie häitsch"? ) properly. Well whatever, my oral English skills were and are always influenced by my German-Bavarian accent...

    "Judge of your natural character by what you do in your dreams" - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    I pronounce them the way they are meant to be pronounced. Pronounced as a ţ when it calls for its harder usage such as "through", "thorough", "heath" and potentially "meth" (though TBH I never use the latter word ) and pronouned as a đ when it calls for its softer usage such as in "that", "bathe", "lather", "rather", "scathe", "Heathen".

    I don't really have that strong an accent, usually it's unplaceable though because essentially it has influences from Scotland (duh), England (associated with many English, my stepfather's mother, a former English flatmates etc.), South Africa (inevitably made it into my stepfather's accent)

    My accent can also vary on who I talk to, funnily enough, when I'm drunk I speak with less of an accent than if I just tell a story ... and here: You never hear your own accent, so the English have said I bring some Scottish in and the Scots have said I bring some English in.

    In some occasions, I supposedly do have a distinctively German note, especially when I have a dry mouth. When I converse with Scots, I always fall into a bit of a Scots-approaching accent, as a result of it being a dry language like German, I bring in some "German accent"; speaking with the English it is oft not as obvious.

    However, even then I never have a problem with "th pronounciation". I do bring some "sing-sang" into the language though, that's something from my home dialect which I've not been able to discard, and don't wish to discard either.

    PS: One thing I'm absolutely unable to do though is to roll my Rs like many Scots for example do, like grrrrrrreat" ... whenever I try to do that, I sorta roll it at the back of my throat as we do in Tyrol, rather than at the front like the Scots, the Finns or the Swedes do it.
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
    -Die alte Seele trauernd und verlassen / Verblassend in einer erklärbaren Welt / Schwebend in einem Dunst der Wehmut / Ein Schrei der nur unmerklich gellt-
    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    I pronounce them the way they are meant to be pronounced. Pronounced as a ţ when it calls for its harder usage such as "through", "thorough", "heath" and potentially "meth" (though TBH I never use the latter word ) and pronouned as a đ when it calls for its softer usage such as in "that", "bathe", "lather", "rather", "scathe", "Heathen".

    I don't really have that strong an accent, usually it's unplaceable though because essentially it has influences from Scotland (duh), England (associated with many English, my stepfather's mother, a former English flatmates etc.), South Africa (inevitably made it into my stepfather's accent)

    My accent can also vary on who I talk to, funnily enough, when I'm drunk I speak with less of an accent than if I just tell a story ... and here: You never hear your own accent, so the English have said I bring some Scottish in and the Scots have said I bring some English in.

    In some occasions, I supposedly do have a distinctively German note, especially when I have a dry mouth. When I converse with Scots, I always fall into a bit of a Scots-approaching accent, as a result of it being a dry language like German, I bring in some "German accent"; speaking with the English it is oft not as obvious.

    However, even then I never have a problem with "th pronounciation". I do bring some "sing-sang" into the language though, that's something from my home dialect which I've not been able to discard, and don't wish to discard either.

    PS: One thing I'm absolutely unable to do though is to roll my Rs like many Scots for example do, like grrrrrrreat" ... whenever I try to do that, I sorta roll it at the back of my throat as we do in Tyrol, rather than at the front like the Scots, the Finns or the Swedes do it.
    Uhhh, we don't pronounce the "th" in that like the "th" in meth.
    Say the word "the". You say the "th" in that like you do in the "th" in the.
    I hope that makes sense.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thorsdottir View Post
    Uhhh, we don't pronounce the "th" in that like the "th" in meth.
    Say the word "the". You say the "th" in that like you do in the "th" in the.
    I hope that makes sense.
    I say the th in meth with a Ţ (or, voiceless th sound, what is that called, voiceless interdental fricative or something) but I obviously don't speak with any sort of Scottish dialect or accent being from Canada. Never heard it said like that before I must admit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thorsdottir View Post
    Uhhh, we don't pronounce the "th" in that like the "th" in meth.
    Say the word "the". You say the "th" in that like you do in the "th" in the.
    I hope that makes sense.
    Scottish pecularities. Queen's English essentially has it down as very different sounds. The one in "the" or "breathe" is remarkably soft, the one in "thorough" remarkably hard. The one in "meth" or "bath" is essentially an intermediate form, with leaning towards the harder "th" (Ţ) rather than the softer "th" (đ).

    The Scots language (I maintain that it is a language in its own right, making this poll non-applicable to it ) does not know the über-soft transcription. It uses an "intermediate version" for the middle đ and starting Đ and a hard version for the starting and final ţ. I still wouldn't get your point though, as there's still a remarkable difference, which I hear every day regardless.

    Within those Germanic languages/dialects that have mainting the đ and ţ
    affrictionate, Scots undoubtedly has the hardest rendering of these. Faroese has the softest rendering thereof, essentially its đ has almost become like the way the "silent h" is used in German.

    Unless I misunderstood you and you just talked about "that" ... I never said it was pronounced immediately like "meth", instead the th in "that" sounds like the th in "breathe" and yes, like the th in "the" but, I claimed no different, did I?
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
    -Die alte Seele trauernd und verlassen / Verblassend in einer erklärbaren Welt / Schwebend in einem Dunst der Wehmut / Ein Schrei der nur unmerklich gellt-
    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

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    All these native English speakers are skewing the results :p. Unless they're from a particular dialect group such as Newfoundlanders who pronounce Ţ as t and đ as d, I think generally native-English speaking people know how to make the voiced and unvoiced dental fricatives.

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    I think I pronounce it the way it should be pronounced. I started to learn English from the age of 8, and my father managed to make me pronounce both versions of "th" correctly. Even my English teacher from the general school pronounced it as "d" or "s", depending on the context, and she used to put me bad marks because I didn't want to pronounce like her. Hehe, my father did a great job

    Anyway, I find it difficult to pronounce "ch" in Ich or in Milch, in German... I am not even sure how should I pronounce it... (I started to learn German recently)

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    I voted for "d" but in the end it depends on the word in question, because I dont say "dink" to "think"

    This = "dis"
    Thought = "thsout"


    However, my pronunciation is not that good anyway, just be glad you dont hear me speaking in English and have just to cope with what I write on the Computer
    Magna Europa est patria nostra
    STOP GATS! STOP LIBERALISM!

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    Well, Agrippa, I suppose there is a good reason why for the "Greater Bavarian Empire" you are the scholar, Valky is the executioner whilst I am the king and diplomat ... seems like I am after all the only one able to pronounce English correctly...
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
    -Die alte Seele trauernd und verlassen / Verblassend in einer erklärbaren Welt / Schwebend in einem Dunst der Wehmut / Ein Schrei der nur unmerklich gellt-
    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

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