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Thread: Who is Monitoring You?

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    Who is Monitoring You?

    Are you concerned about machine surveillance? Your movements and activities are tracked on-line in your home and everywhere you go. We're told this is essentially benign or for advertising and marketing purposes. Monitoring of individuals and group behaviour is increasingly being used by political parties and organisations to target individuals and groups to influence them or to attack them. It doesn't take a huge leap of imagination to understand the malignant use this technology could be put to.

    The UK government Spends £16bn a year on databases, and plans to spend £105bn on data collection projects over the next five years. The number of systems it operates runs into the thousands.

    Google Owns more than 50 applications that collect users’ information, and has multimillion-dollar licensing deals with several news agencies, to help newspapers make money through “interest-based ads”.

    Tesco Two hundred million purchases a week are recorded on Tesco loyalty cards. This data is used to build personality profiles of shoppers including their travel habits, donations to charity and concern for the environment. The data is sold to companies such as Sky, Orange and Gillette.
    Those concerned about privacy can erase cookies or even instruct their computer not to accept them. In doing so, they are opting to be treated not as a known person. For decades, that is what millions of us have been in shopping centres and supermarkets, and on the pavements of big cities: virtually indistinguishable from everyone else. Many of us associate this anonymity with privacy.
    However, not everyone shares that view, not by a long shot. Sitting in the same audiences where some fret about privacy and vow to go “off the grid” are others who publish the most intimate details of their lives on Facebook, MySpace and Twitter. Many of these people take the time to answer surveys which pop up on book, movie and online dating sites. They want automatic systems to know them better so that they can get customised service.

    There is a fundamental divide between those who want machines to be informed and those who’d rather that they stay in the dark. The privacy divide is not between the numerati and the rest of us; it exists, and is widening, among ourselves. We’ve not yet made up our minds about the machines that increasingly manage our lives.
    One thing is clear. The amount of digital data that we produce will continue to grow exponentially. Those concerned about behavioural advertising are getting just the slightest whiff of what is ahead. Consider Sense Networks. A New York-based start-up, the company studies the paths we follow as we move around with mobile phones. In Sense’s computers, each of the millions of mobile-phone users simply show up as an anonymous blinking dot on a map. But by studying those dots, Sense’s scientists can derive all sorts of insights about what they signify
    With this trove of information, Intel researchers are developing what they call “behavioural baselines” for each household. Any deviation from these norms is a signal that something might be amiss. Research is at an early stage, but in time, Intel hopes the computers will be able to recognise the patterns of certain diseases, from the early stages of Parkinson’s to Alzheimer’s. Eventually, the thinking goes, expensive home help and hospital care will be replaced by ever cheaper surveillance gizmos.
    If surveillance of the young and the old makes sense, it will not be long until we all surround ourselves with it. We will be spying on ourselves and sending in digital reports. In fact, the process is well under way: think of all those security cameras. As far as the numerati are concerned, we are already delivering our lives into their laboratories, each day in greater detail.
    Source: http://www.newstatesman.com/scitech/...i-company-dots
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    That's not surprising. Computer surveillance software is becoming increasingly sophisticated and it is not a doubt that many PCs across the globe are being monitored. Of course the practice of surveillance monitoring on people in the U.S. is a breach of our constitutional rights, but the government and it's private corporations don't give a damn. Even a person who is computer-savvy and with the right RAT software could monitor another system without anyone knowing.
    "Life; it kills 100% of those who experience it."

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    When I lived on campus I stopped visiting sites such as Stormfront and Skadi. Boy were those days boring...

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    I'm posting this from my university's campus through their wifi. In fact I've looked at this site in the student union in plain view of other students.

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