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Thread: Scandinavians and the "Germanic" Nomenclature

  1. #41
    Senior Member Patrioten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freja_se View Post
    The term Aryan/arisk is used, but not germansk/Germanic, since it has no link to the Nazis. They didn't speak of Germanics/germaner, they spoke of the Germans and of the Aryan race, and the German people.

    I think this is simply a case of not realizing that the word "germaner"/Germanics doesn't mean tyskar/Germans. lol

    It seems a few Swedes don't know the difference.


    The word germaner/Germanics has never had any racially loaded meaning in Swedish, and I have never heard the term "Germanic/germanska race used in school , but instead the term Aryan race. The word Aryan was very important and the one used, so there you would have a case since it indeed has negative "third reich" connotations.

    Germaner:

    http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germaner

    Aryan:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aryan
    Not that it is possible to do but if one were to do a survey of what comes to mind when a Swede hears the word germansk, do you think that you would get value neutral answers?

  2. #42
    Senior Member Snowman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hauke Haien View Post
    Do you believe in some form of Paleolithic Continuity Theory or do you posit a proto-Germanic Urheimat in Germany within a wider Indo-Europeanisation process?

    The expansion of the Germanic tribes is usually imagined in a North-South direction like this:

    I have to admit that I'm a bit splitted in this question. But I find PIE theory more realistic then PCT at the moment.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Liemannen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagna View Post
    This is a qustion for Scandinavians on this forum, but others can answer as well if they are knowledgeable on the topic.

    Do Scandinavians look down on the term "Germanic"? Do they identify as "Germanic" or do they avoid this term because it reminds them of Germans? Which term is most commonly used in Scandinavia to refer to Germanics as a whole? I know of the existence of words like "nordisk" but I am curious if there is another which includes people like the Germans, English or Dutch.
    The Swedish word for Germanic is as far as I know only used in linguistics and for ancient tribes in today's Germany.

    I don't believe Swedes in general are even aware of the notion of a Germanic people. I know for sure that I've never heard of Germanic culture or the Germanic people before I joined Skadi.

    Swedes often talk about Scandinavia and the Nordic peoples. Yes, peoples, to a Swede there's a big difference between Swedes, Danes, Finns, Icelanders and Norwegians. Not that we believe the others to be inferior (even if they don't manufacture cars and speak funny), just different. Germans, Frisians and Brits are just to strange and to far away to be regarded as anything else than neighbors, good neighbors no doubt, but still just neighbors.
    The strange thing is that though Swedes don't think of themselves as part of a Scandinavian or Germanic people, a lot of them have no problem identifying themselves as part of a European community. However, I believe this to be a rather recent development and I blame it on media and the government funded pro-EU propaganda that's constantly flooding us.

    Before WWII Sweden was a pro-German society because of trade and close relations in the areas of culture and education. German was the foreign language of choice. (As late as when I went to secondary school I was recommended to take German, as all engineering textbooks were written in German. Turned out they were not.)

    Unfortunately the German invasion of Denmark and Norway in 1940 gave Germany a lot of bad-will in Sweden too, and that still sticks. And insidious Jewish propaganda about gas chambers have of course also tainted the reputation of the Germans.

    As the term "Germanic" is not familiar to ordinary Swedes they will inadvertently associate it with the English word "Germany". Therefore I'm afraid that any discussion in Sweden about a common Germanic culture or a united Germanic people could easily be dismissed as Nazi propaganda, effectively ending the discussion.

    Sad but true.

  4. #44
    Senior Member Balder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hauke Haien View Post
    Do you believe in some form of Paleolithic Continuity Theory or do you posit a proto-Germanic Urheimat in Germany within a wider Indo-Europeanisation process?

    The expansion of the Germanic tribes is usually imagined in a North-South direction like this:


    True, and to better understand this is necessary to understand the period of the Nordic Bronze age culture which preceded the early urheimat of Germanic culture or proto-germanic culture.


    Map of the Nordic Bronze Age culture, ca 1200 BC


    Skåne and Jutland are considered by many scholars as the germanic urheimat, meaning that all germanics have originated there, that's why both were the epicenter of the Nordic Bronze age.

    There is an interesting Swedish documentary about the Nordic bronze age and periods that preceded it also as the settlement of Scandinavia after the ice age, the documentary is called Stenristarna

    This video is a clip from the documentary Stenristarna. In this clip Professor Kristian Kristiansen of University of Götenborg explains why he thinks the Nordic Bronze Age started in Skåne and also the its spread to the region in red as shown in map above.

    The King's Grave

  5. #45
    Senior Member Freja_se's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrioten View Post
    Not that it is possible to do but if one were to do a survey of what comes to mind when a Swede hears the word germansk, do you think that you would get value neutral answers?
    Well, according to some here many Swedes don't even know what germansk/germaner means and confuse it with German/s, so I suppose they will think of German, then, which I have already said has some negative connotations as it could bring to mind the war.

    Those who are educated on the meaning of the word germansk/germaner will not think of the third reich but of Germanic languages and culture. It is vey seldom used in a racially charged context, unlike for example the word Aryan, which was often used during the third reich era, and which is often used just as a racial description (Aryan race).

    Most people who know the meaning of the word germanska/ germaner will think of the Germanic languages and culture.

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    Scandinavians would rarely say that they are Germanic. Of course, mostly it is because of the current state of society where germanic still equals to nazi, and you can't be proud of your nation. Since a majority of people still buy that, it should be of no surprise that few people would say they they are Germanic.

    But in their hearts, or in their subconcious if you like, I still think everyone do identify as a germanic, even if they are not aware of it. Even the most PC or "antiracist" people, because they know that the Germans, Dutch, English etc are closer to the Scandinavians than other people. And not only because of geographical closeness, because I think most Swedes would idenitfy more with a German than a Pole, since the language and the mindset would be closer. That is my belief. PC people like to bash their own culture and nation before other nations, and to me this is a sign that they personally are close to it. So a Swedish PC person first will talk negatively about Swedish culture, but he will also be negative against Dutch culture and traditions before he bashes lets say Spanish culture. Do you understand what I mean? To me this is a sign that even the most PC person identify as a Germanic, and we see this as they dislike more what they feel more home with. This is just a theory I have, and nothing scientific...

  7. #47
    Moderator "Friend of Germanics"
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    Scandinavians will rarely say we're Germanic,
    but as Méldmir said we identify with it subconsciously.
    First of course we identify with our most immediate kin,
    the other Scandinavian countries,
    and with Iceland.
    Also with parts of North Germany.
    Then other Germanic countries.

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    The lost identification.

    From the 1870s until the WW! Berlin was the cultural metropole of most scandinavians, and the Germanic identification among them was strong. Finland even considered a German king, after Germany had trained the Finnish Jaeger troups. which played an important role in the War of Liberation 1918, against the social democrat Red guards and their Bolshevik backers. Germany even intervenated in this war and German troups liberated Helsingfors/Helsinki in April 1918. But after the German capitulation, Finland decided to become a republic. Even the other Nordic peoples lost much of their feeling of pan-Germanism, after the german defeat and the chaotic times that followed. Berlin in the 1920s was more known as a decadent metropolis than as a cultural one. and after the founding of the Third Reich there never was time for any kind of re-identification with Germania for most Scandinavians before WW2 broke out.
    The only Nordic country which allied itself with Germany in this war was Finland, during the so called Continuation War against the Soviet Union, 1941-44.

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    I have noticed that people who have little insight into ethnic awareness do not refer to themselves as "germanic". The average Scandinavian probably identifies as a "nordbo", freely translated "inhabitant of the North". That, or "nordisk", "nordic". The word "germanic" is usually used only in the context of germanic languages in language studies.

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    Senior Member Einarr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gryning View Post
    I have noticed that people who have little insight into ethnic awareness do not refer to themselves as "germanic". The average Scandinavian probably identifies as a "nordbo", freely translated "inhabitant of the North". That, or "nordisk", "nordic". The word "germanic" is usually used only in the context of germanic languages in language studies.
    I agree, I have always thought of the term "germanic" as having more of a broad language or cultural meaning, not so much an ethnic or ancestral meaning. I don't mean German or Germany when I say germanic, but rather all regions which fall into a similar category of either language, culture, or ethnic type (any of those). I realize that Scandinavia is not the same as Germany, but they are at least similar to Northern Germany (ethnically/ancestrally speaking), and also fall into the language or cultural category of germanic.

    I use the term nordic to refer to Scandinavians, and nordid as a term for general Northern Europeans (including British Isles/Ireland etc). Would that be incorrect (anyone)?

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