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Thread: Scandinavians and the "Germanic" Nomenclature

  1. #21
    Senior Member Freigeistige's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ÆinvargR View Post
    Oops, I wasn't clear enough, or quoted too much of Aptrgangr's text. I was speaking of Swedish. I totally see the confusion in English. Regarding English, I liked Hauke Haien's logical suggestion of replacing Dutch with Netherlander and German with Dutch.
    It would certainly be more accurate, but linguistic habits die hard for the English language, so it is unfortunately not really a plausible change.

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    Senior Member Snowman's Avatar
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    Most people do not look down on the words german or similar words.

    Although when you are a public person and want to mention something about a Germanic subject, you gotta always put up something negative about it. Very sensitive through the media and for governmental officals to talk about.

    "Which term is most commonly used in Scandinavia to refer to Germanics as a whole? I know of the existence of words like "nordisk" but I am curious if there is another which includes people like the Germans, English or Dutch."

    Tyskar (Germans) is a word atleast I use and many others use when they want to explain all the people who are in the germanic family tree.

    I bet there is better word for it, but "Tyskar" works fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowman View Post
    Tyskar (Germans) is a word atleast I use and many others use when they want to explain all the people who are in the germanic family tree.

    I bet there is better word for it, but "Tyskar" works fine.
    What? You are the second Swede here to say something that is totally alien to me regarding our vocabulary. I have never heard it used about Germanics, and I can't imagine anyone using or perceiving tysk as meaning anything but specifically German. Possibly within some underground, fanatic, Germany-focused Hitler cult with a handful of members, that's it. Seriously wtf.

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    Senior Member Snowman's Avatar
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    He?

    Diden't you know that all Germanic languages comes from Germany?

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    As far as I know Scandinavians don't use the English term "Germanic" to talk about themselves. They use "Nordic" instead. "Germanic" is frequently understood as "German".

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    Senior Member Freja_se's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowman View Post


    Tyskar (Germans) is a word atleast I use and many others use when they want to explain all the people who are in the germanic family tree.

    I bet there is better word for it, but "Tyskar" works fine.
    I'm sorry but that is not correct. Tyskar means Germans, and only Germans. The Swedish word for Germanics is "GERMANER".

    So, no, "tyskar" does not work fine, and I have never in my life seen the word tyskar refer to anything other than Germans, only.


    Germanic languages is called "Germanska språk" in Swedish.

    The German language is called "tyska språket" in Swedish.


    If you want to refer to Scandinavians you would say "skandinaver" or sometimes "nordbor" in Swedish. The adjectives are "skandinavisk" and "nordisk". Scandinavia, or the Nordic countries, is sometimes referred to as "norden".

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    Senior Member Patrioten's Avatar
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    The word for Germanic in Swedish, Germansk, I would guess has a racist/nazi ring to it to most Swedes (those who first of all know or think that they know what it means), it's not a word that many people use except for maybe occationally in discussions about languages in differentiating between Germanic and Slavic languages etc. I've only heard it being used a few times outside of history classes where Hitler and the Third Reich were discussed.

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    Senior Member Freja_se's Avatar
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    Using the word tyskar incorrectly is not common here. Tyskar instead of germaner is just as wrong as German instead of Germanic. It's the same error, but less frequently made here, and no, actually, most people use the word germaner correctly in Swedish, and know the difference.

    The bit about the third reich seems utter nonsense to me, probably since Germanics don't mean Germans, so Germans/tyskar is the word used when you discuss the third reich.

    Maybe where the educational level is extremely low it happens but I have never heard it - ever. "Germaner" is frequently used and tysk means german, period.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrioten View Post
    The word for Germanic in Swedish, Germansk, I would guess has a racist/nazi ring to it to most Swedes (those who first of all know or think that they know what it means), it's not a word that many people use except for maybe occationally in discussions about languages in differentiating between Germanic and Slavic languages etc. I've only heard it being used a few times outside of history classes where Hitler and the Third Reich were discussed.
    That is interesting. What about "Tyskar", the word for Germans? Does it have the same connotations? Could the negative connotations of "Germansk" be the reason Snowman mentioned "Tyskar" as a widely used word?


    Die Sonne scheint noch.

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    Senior Member Freja_se's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagna View Post
    That is interesting. What about "Tyskar", the word for Germans? Does it have the same connotations? Could the negative connotations of "Germansk" be the reason Snowman mentioned "Tyskar" as a widely used word?
    There IS no negative connotation about the word germansk in Swedish. The most frequent use is "de germanska språken", the Germanic languages.

    Actually, it is the other way around. The word Germans/tyskar has a more negative ring to it since it DOES bring to mind the third reich which was a German concept - not a Germanic concept.

    The word germaner is not frequently used when you discuss the third reich, whereas the word tyskar is always and frequently used.


    The word tyskar is not frequently used to mean other than Germans. It means Germans, only. Sorry. lol

    Those who don't get a good education might not know the difference between germaner and tyskar, but as I said, it is very uncommon and a sign of lack of education.

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