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Thread: Against the Immoralists

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    Against the Immoralists

    Nietzsche’s “Will to Power” is a steady descent into chaos, illusion, and animalistic behavior, which calls for a “revaluation of all values,” but is just another warrior rebellion against the sacerdotal caste, which has everywhere been one of the chief causes for the fall of traditional civilizations. As the spark for such a revolt, Nietzsche fabricated an excuse by characterizing not only morality as counterfeit, untrue, but also in declaring that there is no truth; therefore everything is permitted dependent upon a will to power. If Nietzsche limited his criticism to the tedious excesses in the Sacred Law he would be somewhat justified, but by calling it the “holy lie” he opens the door to a vast array of attacks against even the most sacred of principles. Nietzsche accuses the sacerdotal caste of inventing laws so that they may use them as tools of oppression against lower castes. Except for certain overextensions, sacred laws are based on metaphysics—universal principles—for the primary purpose of attaining spiritual liberation. Nietzsche denies that there are certain intrinsic virtues which are as so many aids or supports for knowledge and detachment, and unbeknownst to him, it is only through this that one may rise above good and evil, not by drowning oneself ceaselessly in the passions or desires of a lower will.

    “What is the counterfeiting aspect of morality?” asks Nietzsche. “It pretends to know something, namely what ‘good and evil’ is. That means wanting to know why mankind is here, its goal, its destiny. That means wanting to know that mankind has a goal, a destiny.” Here Nietzsche does not distinguish between essential and nonessential virtues, yet erroneously arrives at the conclusion that the sages wanted something, but want implies action with desire of reward, which is a slavish action. He knew nothing of pure knowledge, of restraining the senses, including mental thought. He knew not of a Universal Ruler, or of virtues as relative to caste, race, gender, and world age.

    To Nietzsche, there is no spirit or pure intellect, only mental thought; indeed he confuses the two as one and the same. He therefore makes of the Absolute something it is not from which point it becomes possible to oppose it, however wrongly these assertions are laid out. According to Nietzsche, “There exists neither ‘spirit,’ nor reason, nor thinking, nor consciousness, nor soul, nor will, nor truth: all are fictions that are of no use. There is no question of ‘subject and object,’ but of a particular species of animal that can prosper only through a certain relative rightness; above all, regularity of its perceptions (so that it can accumulate experience).”

    He further reduces knowledge to “a tool of power,” adding absurdly that “it is plain that it increases with every increase of power.” Knowledge is equated with the will, and power with what is moral “in a strict and narrow anthropocentric and biological sense”; he then equates morality with the feeling of beauty, and therefore desire. In his revaluation, everything is the same: a fraud. Everything is action, the greatness of which is measured by the degree of force. We then arrive at what Evola calls a pseudo-solution. Since action cannot liberate itself from action, Nietzsche’s philosophy results in the abandoning of any real transcendence for individualism and naturalism, for the superstition of life. The rejection of morality is an excuse for the embrace of vice, which leads to chaos and brutality.

    How then does Nietzsche propose to go beyond good and evil? Not by raising oneself above it, for such a supra-human state does not exist in his philosophy, but by negating it and replacing it with an atheistic and immoral morality in which the collective must serve as subjects to the will of a pseudo-warrior ruling caste; and this order will last only until a stronger, more brutal force comes along to replace it. From this we have a total inversion which is open to constant revolution from below: first, by the eradication of the priestly caste, who represent the incarnation of the sacred law, and then the usurpation of the aristocracy by the slaves and outcastes. “We [immoralists] have raised ourselves to the level of honorable thoughts; even more, we determine honor on earth… We immoralists are today the strongest power: the other great powers need us—we construe the world in our image.” Indeed, corruption and immorality permeates everywhere today in the last phase of the Dark Age, but who is so depraved to celebrate this catastrophe, save those decadent fools who profit from it? In stark contrast, the Koran warns: “If the Truth had been in accord with their desires, truly the heavens and the earth and all beings therein would have been in confusion and corruption! Nay, We have sent them their admonition, but they turn away from their admonition.”

    Where everything is reduced to will and force, Nietzsche defies nature in order to make warriors out of everyone, who shall now fight in perpetual wars, because happiness and laughter are signs of weakness. There is no purpose to life; there is a means but to no end. One wonders if Nietzsche really took himself seriously or if it was just a case of narcissistic madness. The event of being destroyed by one’s own rules is just the thing that an orthodox morality is designed to prevent. In the Christian tradition, will is the cause of man’s fall from pure knowledge, because it is a willful refusal to acknowledge the Principle and to turn away from the intellect for the passions which bars man from the spirit. Nietzsche’s will to power is as if immersing oneself further in quicksand by the same forceful methods that got one into it. This is what the Gospel calls “the blind leading the blind.” The Maitri Upanishad shows us the proper way back: “When the mind has been immolated in its own source for love of truth, then the false controls of actions done when it was deluded by sensibilia likewise pass away.” Similarly, in John, “Ye shall know the Truth and the Truth shall set you free.”

    Nietzsche’s philosophy is an inversion of the truth: “The moral man is a lower species than the immoral, a weaker species; indeed—he is a type in regard to morality, but not a type in himself; a copy, a good copy at best—the measure of his value lies outside him. I assess a man by the quantum of power and abundance of his will: not by its enfeeblement and extinction; I regard a philosophy which teaches denial of the will as a teaching of defamation and slander. I assess the power of a will by how much resistance, pain, torture it endures and knows how to turn to its advantage; I do not account the evil and painful character of existence a reproach to it, but hope rather that it will one day be more evil and painful than hitherto.” This immoralist, who Nietzsche praises as the ideal man, is ultimately a deceiver who through evil best learns how to inflict pain and cast deception in order to manipulate the people. Life, which Nietzsche claims to hold in such high regard, is really to him just a war, with its occupiers, propagandists, and psychological operations, its enforcers, torturers, shock troops, and death squads—this is tyranny taken to its extreme conclusion. What more must be said about this philosophical rebellion?

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    Senior Member Ragnar Lodbrok's Avatar
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    "Where everything is reduced to will and force, Nietzsche defies nature in order to make warriors out of everyone, who shall now fight in perpetual wars, because happiness and laughter are signs of weakness. There is no purpose to life; there is a means but to no end. One wonders if Nietzsche really took himself seriously or if it was just a case of narcissistic madness. The event of being destroyed by one’s own rules is just the thing that an orthodox morality is designed to prevent."

    What a godless and illogical way to live one's life or give meaning to civilization. Some of this Nihilistic and Atheistic way of looking at things looks like it caters to the Solipsist types.

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    My only recommendation would be to read Nietzsche in more detail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrimWheat View Post
    My only recommendation would be to read Nietzsche in more detail.
    I presented Nietzsche in his own words; besides one doesn't need to think too long about the natural consequences of a will to power, where there is no truth, no transcendence, where power is the goal, and will, degree of force, and mental perception are the means. Nihilism is a destructive force that seduces people nonetheless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by exit View Post
    I presented Nietzsche in his own words; besides one doesn't need to think too long about the natural consequences of a will to power, where there is no truth, no transcendence, where power is the goal, and will, degree of force, and mental perception are the means. Nihilism is a destructive force that seduces people nonetheless.
    Nietzsche approached ideas from multiple angles. With one or two carefully selected quotes, one could portray him as anything.

    What's important to remember is that Nietzsche didn't welcome the advent of a nihilistic age, or even necessarily the death of God. He was concerned for humanity and the fulfillment of life; but his prescriptions for self-overcoming, both individual and specific, ran counter to the morality of then and now.

    Absence of absolute truth, absolute values etc. were not things he lauded, but rather things he understood to be inescapable realities. His philosophy, among other things, was to create a solution to that reality, a reality he worried would purge the creative forces from mankind by draining the species of purpose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrimWheat View Post
    Nietzsche approached ideas from multiple angles. With one or two carefully selected quotes, one could portray him as anything.
    Nietzsche was a confused individual who became the victim of his own philosophy. I have examined the main principles of his philosophy and showed them to be false and destructive. When the center is rotten it does not matter how healthy some of the branches are.

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    Some of the people around Jesus wanted to take up arms against Rome, but Jesus warned them that "Those who take up the sword shall perish by it." All of the violent revolutions of the past have only paved the way for worse forms of government because they were driven by false principles. When there is no truth and therefore no orthodox tradition then it falls to rule by the lowest common denominator, the tyranny of the majority. When observing something wrong with civilization one must not conclude that the solution is to do the wrong better; two wrongs don't make a right.

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    Senior Member Ashera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by exit View Post
    Some of the people around Jesus wanted to take up arms against Rome, but Jesus warned them that "Those who take up the sword shall perish by it."
    And what was the effect in the end? That the Romans tacked him down the cross...

    All of the violent revolutions of the past have only paved the way for worse forms of government because they were driven by false principles.
    Yes, the revolutions of the past. But today there are no Romans anymore - we have to fight them in our "minds", this is: their ideas that work there like viruses or bad "memes" resp. "mythems", again and again revitalizing fascism and "state slavery".
    What did Baudrillard say? "Metallurgy has changed into semiurgy". It is a war of signs...
    Perhaps we should fight the last battle in cyberspace - seen as a "mass psychoanalysis" and a "mass karthasis" as phylotherapy....

    When there is no truth and therefore no orthodox tradition then it falls to rule by the lowest common denominator, the tyranny of the majority. When observing something wrong with civilization one must not conclude that the solution is to do the wrong better; two wrongs don't make a right.
    We need more culture and less civilization. Civilization is just the problem, and concepts like "socioculture" amplify it...

    Ashera

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    Jesus...
    "The ones who nailed him to the cross, now rule in his name."

    -Skyclad, Burnt Offering to the Bone Idol

    Because happiness and laughter are signs of weakness.
    On the contrary, you forget Nietzsche's concept of the laughing lion, where laughter is a tool of power, an aspect of the Master morality. Central to Nietzsche's philosophy is the affirmation of life, which extols passion, play, and laughter; standing opposed to asceticism and the denial of life (i.e. Buddhism and Christianity). I have always been a stark opponent of asceticism, there is no virtue in starvation... I rather ascribe to the Sikh notion that one can be spiritual while affirming life and following the path of the householder (Grihastha).

    Below is one of the best treatments of the error of asceticism:


    Jainism was completely rejected by the Gurus. It preaches a life of the ascetic combined with extreme Ahinsa (non injury to any living being) as well as a very unhygienic lifestyle:
    "They have their heads plucked, drink dirty water and repeatedly beg and eat other's leavings. They spread out ordure, with their mouths, suck its ordure and dread to look at water. With hands smeared with ashes, they have their heads plucked like sheep. The daily routine of their mothers and fathers they give up, and their kith and kin bewail loudly. For them none gives barley rolls and food on leaves, nor performs last rites, nor lights earthen lamp. After death where shall they be cast? The sixty-eight places of pilgrimage grant them no refuge, and Pandits eat not their food. They ever remain filthy day and night, and bear not sacrificial marks on their brow. They ever sit in groups, as if mourning and go not into the True Court. With begging bowls slung round their loins and a clew in their hands, they walk in single file. They are neither disciples of Gorakh nor adorers of Shiva, nor Muslim Qazis and Mullah's." (Guru Nanak, Slok, pg. 149)

    http://www.sikhs.org/relig_j.htm

    Sikhism encourages one to live like a Lion, as a matter of fact, the surname Singh, which male Sikhs take, means "Lion" in Panjabi. The women take the last name Kaur, which means "Princess", they are to carry themselves like royalty, not to mention their long-standing martial tradition, which has preserved them against centuries of Muslim oppression (i.e. Sikhs being decapitated and burned alive.) You will be hard pressed to ever find a Sikh beggar. Their Dharma is one of nobility and dignity.
    SVMDEVSSVMCAESARSVMCAELVMETINFERNVM

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